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first_imgDutch asset manager and pensions provider Blue Sky Group (BSG) is to decrease the number of investment funds it offers and the number of external managers it uses, in order to reduce complexity and costs.In its annual report for 2018, the provider also said that it would focus on growing its client base for pensions administration, to improve its service provision.In February, the provider announced that it had taken on pensions administration for Loodsen, the €959m occupational pension fund for marine pilots.BSG, which is the provider for Dutch airline KLM’s three pension schemes, said it wanted to merge together funds in which several of its pension clients participated. Blue Sky Group runs assets for KLM’s pension funds for pilots, cabin crew and ground staffIt predicted that new individual products would lead to merging and standardising of administration and asset management. “As a result, providers can only distinguish themselves through personal advice, communication and costs,” the company said.BSG recorded a pre-tax profit of €1.6m for 2018, a significant increase relative to the €400,000 profit for the previous year, which it attributed to a new method of charging costs to its KLM fund clients.The company’s turnover rose from €33.7m to €37.4m, with the results from asset management rising by more than €5m.BSG’s assets under management dropped from €22bn to €21.5bn. The company said it expected collective pensions management to remain the core activity of its pension provision operations for many years to come, but added that the emphasis in a new pensions system would likely be on individual pension arrangements.last_img read more

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first_imgTonight is the annual Homecoming of Batesville High School.  I would imagine that most girls have at one time or another fantasized about being Homecoming Queen.  One young lady will get that opportunity tonight.At Batesville Homecoming has become a bigger tradition with the addition of the football alumni recognition.  This was started by Jerry Walsh and is now continued by Terry Giesting.  The usual classes honored are those from 10-year intervals back from the current year.  All alumni are invited but just these classes will be featured.I hope to see a lot of you at the game tonight against Lawrenceburg.  Not only is it Homecoming, but the winner will probably be the 3A champion of the EIAC this year.  See you tonight at the game!last_img

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first_imgNEW DELHI: India cricketer Ravindra Jadeja on Friday said that there’s still a long way to go in fight against the ongoing coronavirus pandemic and that’s why the citizens should all do their part by staying at home. “I am staying home to fight against COVID-19, are you?” Jadeja said in the video posted on his Instagram account in which he can be seen wearing the blue Indian jersey and doing his famous sword celebrations with his bat. “There is still a long way to go in this battle against COVID-19. We all got to do our part by staying home to help save lives,” he captioned the video.India has been in a nationwide lockdown since March 24 which has been extended twice due to the surge in COVID-19 cases. It is currently slated to end on May 17. IANSAlso Read: Lionel Messi on LaLiga restart ‘Looking forward to the competitions again’last_img read more

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first_imgMay 10, 1991, they came dressed for a funeral. On this day the official colors of the University of Wisconsin baseball team where not cardinal and white, but black.It was the final day of competition for the team not just for the season, but forever. So, for the team’s doubleheader versus Purdue every player wore black caps, black stirrups, black cleats and black undershirts to mourn the death of the baseball program.It isn’t everyday you say a 117-year-old died too soon, but that is definitely the case here.”It’s a sad day, not only for the Big Ten but for college baseball,” Iowa Coach Duane Banks said after UW baseball team lost its final appeal. “It’s an absolute sin that something like this has to happen.”At the very least the program went under with dignity, splitting its doubleheader with the Boilermakers, though symbolically, in its final game, the baseball team simply couldn’t muster enough offense to fight back, losing 1-0, much in the same way it couldn’t fight against being a cost casualty anymore.Head coach Steve Land and the Wisconsin Dugout Club fought gallantly against the move to cut baseball, but in the end the Athletic Department chairs won — and lost.With Wisconsin’s history in its final hours the ball was handed to freshman pitcher Jason Schlutt to make the final start of his UW career, and the final start in the career of UW.Schlutt, a young talent from Baroda, Mich., with a 2-5 record and 4.46 ERA, was young enough not to feel the pressure, admitting that it wasn’t until after the game that he fully realized the ramifications.”During the game it was all about winning,” Schlutt said.It was just like any other game that season for Schlutt and the Badgers, who had spent the duration of the year knowing that the program was going under.”That was a weird feeling, going from place-to-place for the last time,” said Brett Wyngarden, who was the designated hitter during the last game. “It was like some sad farewell tour.”Schlutt on the other hand, viewed every game as an opportunity, not only to pick up a win, but to pick up a new home. Most players on the team had a year’s advance notice to transfer, so games were dress rehearsals for prospective transfers.”Personally, being a freshman, you started to notice that every series was sort of like a tryout, for the team we were playing against,” related Schlutt “We were really just struggling to get some wins at that time in the Big Ten, so the whole gravity of the thing hadn’t hit yet. Plus, there was still hope at that point.”Schlutt got off to a strong start, striking out two batters in the first inning. However the Badger hitters were following suit, unable to touch Purdue’s pitching — starter Jason Smith. Ironically, the move to cut baseball was recommended by then brand-new athletic director Pat Richter, who was himself a baseball player and all-conference selection in 1963. According to Richter, the decision to dump baseball was based on the state’s poor spring weather, inadequate facilities and Title IX considerations that require equitable spending for men’s and women’s sports.However, the biggest reason was surely the $1.95 million deficit in the athletic department budget, during the dark days of UW athletics, before the rebirth of the football program.”It’s a situation where you put on blinders and say, ‘Look, you have to cut back,'” said Richter, who years later, after his tenure as A.D. was over, would look back and call cutting baseball the hardest decision he ever made at Wisconsin.With five innings in the books, Schlutt was still smoking, tearing through the Purdue lineup, having faced only two batters over the minimum. It was still a stalemate, a classic pitcher’s duel, as Smith matched Schlutt pitch for pitch. The UW team captain Tom O’Neill had gotten on base twice, and twice stolen second, but was left stranded both times, as Tom Vilet, hitting behind O’Neill struck out twice. Opportunities missed …Cutting baseball did make sense, especially in 1991, when the entire the athletic department was sinking in debt.For one, the weather truly was god-awful early in the year, especially since the team rarely traveled to out-of-state tournaments, like the softball team currently does, when the weather is still prone to being so inclement, through March and into April.”From a revenue base and from an environment point, I totally understand why baseball was cut,” Schlutt said. “Some of the spring days when it is caught between rain and snow, with the wind blowing off the lake you would look at each other and say ‘what are we doing out here?'”The facilities and their placement were also very much undesirable at the time, as Guy Lowman Field hadn’t even had a press box until just a couple years before the program was killed. It was positioned where Goodman Diamond now sits, across the way from UW Hospital, behind the Neilson Tennis Stadium.”Where Guy Lowman was, any time the wind blew, it was cold and the field didn’t drain very well,” said former Badger pitcher Lance Painter, who later went on to a prosperous 11-year career in the major leagues. “Then one day later I was watching ESPN2 and I saw Guy Lowman Field and it was a softball field now, so I guess if they would’ve put some money into it then, it could’ve been a pretty neat place.”Joe Girardi, a Northwestern grad and currently managing the Florida Marlins once described playing a double-header against UW in an 8-degree wind chill, saying he was just thankful he was catching and able to move around.Another factor was fan support. While it was fantastic for the season and historical finale, was also typically poor.”If you think about Wisconsin, it was a football and hockey town,” Painter said. “I know when I was there, very few people actually knew there was baseball team on campus.””Some games there were no fans at all, just some of the players’ girlfriends that were brave enough to sit out there,” said Schlutt.In the sixth inning disaster struck. Schlutt gave up a single to Purdue’s Phil Hollis, driving in right fielder Craig Robertson and giving the Boilermakers the narrowest of leads. However, on this day, that margin was looking more and more insurmountable as Smith continued to keep the Badger bats silent.Wisconsin’s baseball history had its moments. The school won or tied for five Big Ten Championships, though none of them after 1950. There had been many players to move on to successful pro careers, like Harvey Kuenn, Red Wilson, Lance Painter and Rick Reichardt.In truth, the Badgers were, at best, mediocre and at worst, perennial Big Ten doormats.The final Wisconsin totals included 1,445 victories and 1,278 losses — above .500, at least.Could the Badger program have been successful? Was there even the remote chance of being consistently competitive in the Big Ten?”It goes in cycles. Obviously the Minnesotas, the Michigans, the Illinois, they were the better programs, but there was always room after those top three,” Painter said. “I believe that the program was heading in the right direction.””We had players who could play the game,” Wyngarden said. “But there was plenty to build on.”Land points to Notre Dame, whose program was very similar to UW’s in the early 90s, before the Fighting Irish received a wealth of new funding. Today, the Fighting Irish are among the best of the Midwest.It was the bottom of the seventh. Schlutt had done his part, doing a superb job at damage control and leaving Wisconsin down one. But it was not to be as Wyngarden made the final out of the game.”I didn’t realize until that last out was made against Purdue that ‘Hey, I’m not going to play for Wisconsin anymore’,” Schlutt said.”It’s been a trying situation for everyone involved,” a tearful Land said after the final game. “I can’t say enough about this group. The way they’ve responded to everything has been incredible.”The overwhelming feeling was one of disbelief that it was all truly over.”I knew something was going on, but what I thought was that they might cut into the budget. I didn’t believe that they could actually cut the program,” Painter said.”I think we all kind of thought that someone was going to come in and save the day and that the sport was not going to be cut. I mean it’s the University of Wisconsin and baseball is a major sport.”To this day Schlutt holds the game ball from the final out. He one day hopes to be able to throw it on opening day of UW’s new program. But will that program ever come?”I would like nothing more than to see that program come back. I would support it fully, not only emotionally but financially too,” Schlutt said. “In fact I’d love to come back and coach. For something to be around that long and then just disappear the year you show up, it’s just mind-boggling.”There have been no signs of Wisconsin officials showing any interest in a new program. So for now, the last image of the University of Wisconsin baseball team will be one of mourning — one dressed in black.last_img read more

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first_imgThe USC Interfaith Council held its fifth Annual Student Multifaith Leadership Conference on Saturday at the University Religious Center. The student-led conference started at USC five years ago and has been hosted at other universities in Southern California, making its way back to USC this year.At the day-long conference, students attended professional and student-led workshops, participated in a “speedfaithing” activity and listened to Antonia Blumberg, a USC alumna and Huffington Post writer, give a speech on her spiritual awakening.The first set of workshops explored faith’s potential to promote unity between people of different races, religions and cultural backgrounds.Cynthia Davis, a member of the Bahá’í community in Mountain View, California, spoke on the need for a new narrative regarding interfaith — a need to build a community where people from diverse heritages feel safe discussing their beliefs.“When we talk about race and interfaith relations, there is a lot of injustice that has happened and stories that need to be heard,” Davis said.Despite conflicts that have arisen between faiths, Davis believes religion is central to society.“Religion has always been like glue in our communities and people have always been willing to sacrifice short term and selfish goals for the sake of their faith,” Davis said. “Our spiritual nature is where our generosity lives, our friendliness, our kindness, our forgiveness, and that’s something all major religions have taught.”After the first set of workshops ended, students partook in a “speedfaithing” activity in which they were introduced to various religions, including Agnosticism, Bahaism, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Mormonism.Students then had the opportunity to attend either a workshop on meditation or on praying the rosary as practiced in the Roman Catholic tradition.Elaine Krebs, an Interfaith Council Representative from the Caruso Catholic Center, discussed the importance of faith in an increasingly secular world.“Faith is still important because it takes you out of your [physical] self and connects you to a higher power [that] has more direction,” Krebs said. “Also, different faiths and different religions form community, and community is central.”After a lunch provided by the Interfaith Council, students attended a final set of workshops on promoting interfaith dialogue on their college campuses, finding meaning in life without religious traditions and reconciling differences in scientific and religious beliefs.To conclude the conference, Blumberg spoke to students, faculty members and Interfaith Council coordinators about her spiritual journey.At 20, Blumberg took her junior year off to travel to New Zealand as a member of the World Wide Opportunities on organic farms. In exchange for accommodation and food, Blumberg worked on the farms, selling fruit and experiencing the beauty of the New Zealand landscape.After buying a bus ticket and traveling throughout the country, Blumberg developed a greater sense of self and began following an earth-based, pagan faith.Coming back to USC to finish her bachelor’s degree in anthropology, Blumberg said she felt more self-assured and in touch with her spirituality.“The relationship that you develop with yourself is the most raw and longest standing relationship you will ever have in life,” Blumberg said. “Interfaith is a way of life. It’s an attitude of questioning our own assumptions and habits, noticing the beauty in others and the beauty in ourselves. It’s a way of showing up to life with grace and humility and knowing that the journey begins within, but we can’t walk the path alone.”last_img read more

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first_imgA member of that dominating first line, senior Brooke Ammerman (10) has had plenty of reasons to share hugs this season, scoring 13 goals and dishing out nine more assists.[/media-credit]To be the best you have to beat the best, and that’s exactly what UW women’s hockey has done this season.Recently completing one of their toughest stretches of schedule this season, the Badgers (22-2-2) drudged through some serious competition, facing No. 2 Minnesota, No. 6 North Dakota and No. 8 Minnesota-Duluth all in consecutive series. While the Badgers played both Minnesota and North Dakota away from the friendly confines of the Kohl Center, the team amassed an impressive 3-1-2 record over its last three opponents, helping the team hold on tight to its No.1 ranking.But the motor behind Wisconsin’s solid drive through its recent WCHA series was the play and leadership of its forwards. Wisconsin’s first line, including forwards Brianna Decker, Brooke Ammerman, and Carolyne Prevost enjoyed plenty of early season success, but ran into adversity Nov. 25 when Prevost went down with a knee injury against St. Cloud State.Ammerman and Decker have been dynamic throughout the season, as the duo helped shoulder the load during Prevost’s absence. Both have been the models of consistency and durability, playing in all 26 games this season and combining for 49 goals. The duo also leads Wisconsin with over 50 points each, including a team best 32 assists apiece.“The line’s been good all year, so when we were missing Carolyne obviously goal production and power plays were a little different when she wasn’t on the ice,” head coach Mark Johnson said.Back at full strength upon Prevost’s return from injury on Jan. 6 , the Badgers’ first line picked up where it left off, combining for an impressive 16 goals and 21 assists in UW’s past three series. On an individual level, Prevost has recorded five goals and eight assists, indicating the cohesiveness that exists between the three forwards.“I think we’ve done well,” Prevost said. “Three tough series so far since we’ve been back from break. It’s been a grind. It’s been kind of like October at the start of the year. We seem to always get everyone’s best game, ever since I’ve been a freshman. So I think it helps you prepare for each team.”As a senior, Ammerman knows the importance of remaining focused throughout the entire season, especially when facing obstacles like the injury to Prevost. The senior forward emphasized retaining that mental toughness for the duration of the season.“I think our toughest challenge will be mentally focusing in,” Ammerman said. “I think we have all the tools to win those games, but mentally we’re going to have to get that edge.”Johnson also stressed the importance of being mentally focused but emphasized the importance of staying healthy for the rest of the season. The Badgers hope to avoid any injuries in the coming weeks, as a late-season injury to any player would be devastating with the post-season looming on the horizon.“This time in the season you want to stay healthy, shorten up practice a little bit and try to keep kids energetic as far as coming to the rink,” Johnson said. “They need to keep doing the little things that have made them successful up to this point and not lose track or focus.”Prevost got lucky with the timing of her injury, as the forward benefited from the extra time off over winter break to rehab and get back into shape. While the senior missed some time on the ice, it seems as if Prevost never left, as the Badgers’ first line continues to look as dominant as ever.“[Our line’s] just been clicking,” Prevost said. “It’s like I never left. We seem to find each other on the ice to make our line successful.”last_img read more

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first_imgAll the usual suspects showed up for Wisconsin on the offensive end of the floor Monday night against Michigan.Star guard Taylor Wurtz piled in 21 points while Jade Davis put in 13 to guide the Badgers through a pesky Wolverines squad. But one name in the box score had a surprisingly seismic contribution for the Badgers at the Kohl Center.In a game that saw the Badgers yield a 16-point lead to the Wolverines over seven minutes in the second half, one Wisconsin post player came through with a defining performance that made a difference. This time the player’s name wasn’t Anya Covington.Sophomore Cassie Rochel was scoreless through the first half for the Badgers, but the young center stepped up when it mattered most, scoring all nine of her points in the second half while adding five rebounds to a solid performance.For a player who admits to having a pass-first mentality, Rochel certainly grabbed the spotlight for herself in the Badgers third consecutive conference win.“My biggest thing this year was struggling with confidence,” Rochel said. “But I really have to give all the credit to my guards. They found me when I was open, and I just happened to finish my layups this game.”Rochel, who players and fans alike often refer to as a diamond in the rough, emerged during the most crucial stretch of the game. With little more than four minutes remaining in the game the score was deadlocked at 49-49, as the Wolverines used an 18-2 run to climb back from the abyss. But as quickly as the Wolverines had tied it the Badgers had an answer, as Rochel intelligently broke off-ball to the weak side of the basket where Badger guard Jade Davis quickly dumped it an easy Rochel layup. Rochel’s first points of the game were big ones, but she wasn’t done yet.With the Badgers only leading by four with two minutes remaining, Rochel grabbed an offensive rebound off of a Morgan Paige miss and followed it up with a put-back layup. On the next offensive series Rochel once again helped the Badgers with a solid scoring look.After Michigan’s Kate Thompson answered with a three on the ensuing possession, the Badger lead had dwindled to three with only one minute left. But once again, Rochel would not let the Badgers fall. Using a terrific post seal on the block against a smaller Michigan player, Rochel received a near-perfect entry pass from Paige. From there it was all Rochel, as she used a quick drop step on the baseline to draw a conventional 3-point play. All nine of Rochel’s points came in the final four minutes and 13 seconds of the game.Pressing issues at handIn the first half the Badgers commandeered a stranglehold on the game rarely seen this season.Up 26-16 heading into halftime, it looked like Wisconsin was in cruise control. The Badgers benefited from constant open looks throughout the floor while holding the Wolverines to a measly 23 percent from the floor.But Michigan head coach Kevin Borseth had a defensive trick up his sleeve that almost jettisoned the struggling Wolverines out of the Kohl Center with a win.After struggling to scrape up 16 points in the first half, Borseth turned a 2-1-2 half-court and sometimes full-court press on the Badgers. Borseth had displayed a glimpse of the press when the Wolverines were down 10-2 early in the game but unleashed it in full for almost the duration of the second half. As the Badgers turned the ball over three times against the Wolverines’ aggressive press, their lead began to dwindle. The Wolverines benefited immensely from the Badgers second half miscues against the press, scoring 12 second half points off of Wisconsin turnovers.“Part of it is not them necessarily [other teams] taking it out of our hands but the decision that’s made,” Wisconsin head coach Bobbie Kelsey said. “You can’t just throw it and try to throw it over people, you have to use a fake, you have to use a step-through, a bounce pass every now and again … you can’t just turn and throw it.”While the Wolverine press created turnovers it also created a mental challenge for the Badgers, as the team stopped looking inside and started settling for cross-court passes. During the Wolverines’ press and coinciding run the Badgers attempted five threes, all unsuccessful.“Whatever we were doing wasn’t working … so I was ready to try something,” Borseth said. “Grab in the bag of tricks and see what happens. During that period of time maybe it changed the rhythm of their shots and they didn’t make any, and we maybe stayed in it too long.”last_img read more

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first_imgBASSETERRE, St. Kitts, CMC – The fourth annual Caribbean Investment Summit gets underway in St. Kitts on Wednesday with emphasis on improving the much controversial Citizenship by Investment Programme (CIP) that some regional countries use as a means of luring foreign investments to the Caribbean.The conference here coincides with the 35th anniversary of the CIP here, under whch investors receive citizenship of the twin island Federation in return for making a substantial investment in the socio-economic development of the country.The two-day conference is being held under the theme “The Caribbean Advantage” and the government said it is expected to be attended by more than 400 delegates including those from China, India, the Middle East, Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States.“Caribbean Investment Summit to be held this week in St. Kitts-Nevis will look back at the country’s innovative idea of economic citizenship 35 years ago and discuss the sustainable path forward,” a government statement said.It said that prime Minister and Minister of Finance, Dr. Timothy Harris will address the conference on the topic “A Focus on Regional Leadership and Vision: 35 Years of Caribbean CIP, looking back, the sustainable path forward”.Antigua and Barbuda hosted the first two summits in 2016 and 2017 and while the twin island Federation hosted the event last year “the regional participants in the CIP industry decided that the hosting of the annual event should be rotated in order to ensure equitable exposure and opportunities for all members”.last_img read more

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first_imgShare Related Articles Share As the country gears itself up for the implementation of new operating regulations, Spanish gaming trade association Consejo Empresarial del Juego (CEJUEGO) has been incorporated into the Confederación Española de Organizaciones Empresariales (CEOE).Spanish news sources have reported that the Socialist Workers’ Party’s (PSOE), which was successful in the most recent election, had agreed to Podemos party demands on restricting gambling services and betting advertising.The new incorporation was agreed back in March 2018, which will see CEJUEGO draw upon the influence of CEOE as more regulations are set to come into force. “This incorporation is very good for us because of the possibilities it offers us to give more visibility to our sector to the government, the media and society in general,” CEJUEGO chief executive Alejandro Landaluce said.The agenda on reforming Spain’s gambling laws is not limited to PSOE and Podemos. This April, El Pais and Xataka published in-depth reports outlining 15-years of Spain’s liberalised gambling/betting marketplace.Pointing to Treasury statistics, Xataka reports that since 2013 Spanish gamblers have doubled from 645,000 to 1.5 million in 2018, with Spanish consumers moving away from ‘soft games’ such as the ‘Quinelas’ betting pools and ‘Once’ lotteries to online casino and live betting.Despite not gaining the 176 seats needed for a majority government, the PSOE’s 2019 budget sets out plans to implement more stringent controls on the gambling sector. Submit Spanish government removes Espinosa from DGOJ leadership May 6, 2020 Spain orders ‘social shield’ to fast track gambling advertising window April 1, 2020 Cejuego seeks advertising parity for Spanish gambling February 10, 2020 StumbleUponlast_img read more

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first_imgDES MOINES — Today is the first day of open enrollment for the 39-thousand Iowans who buy health insurance through the Affordable Care Act. Plans are being offered through Medica and Wellmark.Iowa Insurance Commissioner Doug Ommen recommends those on ACA plans review their household income to make sure they still qualify for federal subsidies. Ommen says, “Because we have seen, under the Affordable Care Act, a real impact on those people that have earnings that based on household structure, put them outside of the subsidy range.”Ommen says those on A-C-A plans should review their coverage options during this limited enrollment period. “If they’re comfortable and familiar with ‘healthcare-dot-gov,’ they can do that or they can consider speaking to a licensed insurance agent about some other options that they might have,” he says.The open enrollment period ends December 15th for plans that are effective January 1st of next year.last_img read more

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