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first_imgHours before Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump clashed over taxes, trade, and the economy in the first presidential debate Tuesday, a different kind of discussion took place at Boston’s historic Faneuil Hall.Dubbed the debate before the debate, the Faneuil Forum drew hundreds of people who packed the hall, sometimes called the Cradle of Liberty for the role it played during the American Revolution, to take part in a lively civic dialogue led by prominent Harvard Professor Michael Sandel on the future of democracy.After being introduced by NPR host Robin Young as “the most relevant living professor and philosopher in the world” and a “rock star moralist,” Sandel, who teaches “Justice,” one of the most popular courses at the College, started the discussion by asking the audience to ponder the purpose of democracy.https://www.facebook.com/HUBWeekBoston/videos/1625357927761588/“We’re not going to debate about tax policy, Syria, emails, or the wall,” said Sandel, the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Government in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. “Instead, I’d like to propose that we have a discussion about what democracy is for, with the hope that this discussion can help us begin to figure out how to repair the tattered state of democracy in our country.”Sandel’s lecture is a signature event of HUBweek, Boston’s civic festival of ideas and innovation that runs until Oct. 1 and is now in its second year. Founded by Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, The Boston Globe, and Massachusetts General Hospital, the festival showcases scholars and their cutting-edge research during public forums, discussions, hands-on demonstrations, and lectures, all of which celebrate the intersection of science, technology, arts, and ethics.With thought-provoking questions, Sandel enthralled his listeners, who voiced their opinions in front of a microphone or evinced their agreement or disagreement by raising green or red signs.Some of the questions he raised explored ethical dilemmas, from vote swapping to “space savers” to buying and selling citizenship, all of which he said illuminate “the big question of what is democracy about, and why does it seem to be ailing these days?”Michael Sandel talks with Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh during the Faneuil Forum HUBweek event inside Faneuil Hall Square in Boston. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer“Should people be free to buy and sell votes? Should vote swapping be permitted? Should there be a free market for votes?” Sandel asked the audience. And although the audience showed its disapproval of vote swapping, some members favored a free market for votes because it might lead to more voter participation. Others called that a “slippery slope.”One of the strongest opponents to buying and selling votes was Boston Mayor Marty Walsh, who was in the audience. Asked by Sandel to join him on the stage, Walsh called the proposal “a big mistake.”“People died for our right to vote,” he said. “It’s our obligation to go out and vote. If we have to incentivize people to vote by paying them, I’m not sure their vote is actually worth it in the first place.”When asked about the “moral dilemma” posed by “space savers,” used by Boston residents in the winter to lay claim to a parking spot they’ve shoveled out after a storm, Walsh said it’s the biggest decision he has to make every winter. Boston’s current policy allows people to use space savers for 48 hours after a major snowfall.“If we can get everyone to work together to shovel out the space and be courteous to each other, we’d have a better society,” he said. “If we can get to a point in which people can respect each other and help each other by shoveling the snow, that’s the way to go and the place we need to get to. I don’t know if Boston is ready for that now.”Sandel also delved into immigration, a controversial issue in the presidential race, and probed the morality of selling the right to immigrate and putting a price on citizenship. Most listeners favored the idea of selling the right to immigrate, though some worried that could lead to a less egalitarian system.Participants overwhelmingly vote in favor of a hypothetical motion during the Faneuil Forum. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer“It’s quite tricky,” said a woman in the audience. “If you have the money, you can come. If you don’t, you exclude a huge number of people who could contribute.”At the end of the debate, Sandel told the audience to be mindful of embracing a market-driven vision of democracy, in which votes and citizenship can be had for a price, because that cheapens democracy and civic life.“We only just scratched the surface of the question with which we began,” he said. “What really is democracy for, and what is civic life about? And is it tainted, or corrupted, or diminished, or degraded if it merges with the market? Do we need to separate the markets on the one hand from the activity of buying and selling on the other for democracy to flourish?”Sandel said he was concerned about the state of democracy and civic life in the United States, where a “certain impoverished understanding of what democracy is for” has taken hold, including the ideas that “democracy is just a way of registering our own economic self-interests every four years” and citizenship “just a matter of being a shareholder in a prosperous society.”“We’ve come to think that democracy is economics by other means, and we’ve come to treat citizenship as a kind of extension of market relations,” Sandel said. “In ancient Athens, Aristotle said the point of political community is not just residence in a common site, it’s not just for the sake of easing exchange in economic relations. The point of democracy, he thought, was to create a setting in which citizens will deliberate with one another as equals, and, in deliberating, they would learn something and will become better citizens and better human beings than they would otherwise be.”Reluctance to adopt a thoroughgoing consumerist conception of citizenship and democracy can only help democracy, said Sandel.“As we hesitate to embrace a market-driven vision of democracy, we still affirm with part of ourselves, at least, that ancient democratic idea, the idea that the point of democracy is to deliberate together, in common, in gathering places like this, about justice, about the common good, and about what it means to be a citizen.”SaveSaveSaveSavelast_img read more

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first_imgTen faculty members have been awarded 2017 Walter Channing Cabot Fellowships for their outstanding publications:Stephen Burt, Professor of English, The Poem Is You (Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 2016).Timothy Colton, Morris and Anna Feldberg Professor of Government,Russian Studies, Faculty Associate at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Russia: What Everyone Needs to Know (Oxford, England: Oxford UP, 2016).Carter Eckert, Yoon Se Young Professor of Korean History, Park Chung Hee and Modern Korea: The Roots of Militarism 1866-1945 (Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 2016).Peter E. Gordon, Amabel B. James Professor of History, Affiliate of the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures and the Department of Philosophy, Adorno and Existence (Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 2016).Helen Hardacre, Reischauer Institute Professor of Japanese Religions and Society, Shinto: A History (Oxford, England: Oxford UP, 2016).Jane Kamensky, Professor of History and Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Foundation Director of the Schlesinger Library, A Revolution in Color: The World of John Singleton Copley (New York, NY: W.W. Norton, 2016).Joseph Koerner, Victor S. Thomas Professor of History of Art and Architecture, Affiliate of the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, Senior Fellow of the Society of Fellows, Bosch and Bruegel: From Enemy Painting to Everyday Life (Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP, 2016).Lisa McGirr, Professor of History, The War on Alcohol: Prohibition and the Rise of the American State (New York, NY: W.W. Norton, 2016).Tommie Shelby, Caldwell Titcomb Professor of African and African American Studies and Philosophy, Dark Ghettos (Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 2016).Daniel Smail, Frank B. Baird, Jr. Professor of History and Chair of the Department of History, Legal Plunder: Households and Debt Collection in Late Medieval Europe (Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 2016).last_img read more

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first_imgOf course it does – just not for everything. A growing number of enterprises, particularly in the financial services sector, are realising that applying 99.99999% SLAs to all workloads isn’t necessarily the most cost-effective way to run IT infrastructure. As developers become more agile, businesses should consider how they can manage SLAs in a way that’s as flexible as their cloud infrastructure: not just seeking to lower costs, but to be able to “scale” availability up and down as their needs shift and evolve.Let’s say you’re running a low-level workload to test a new service – part of your new DevOps strategy, perhaps. The service doesn’t need extremely high levels of uptime because you’re still in the testing and iteration phase: in fact, your developers want to see when the service fails to identify potential areas for improvement. But let’s say the service experiences far larger demand than expected during public beta, so much so that it starts to hit performance issues or outages. Your uptime requirements have just changed and you need a way to quickly “scale” your SLAs to keep up.At the same time, there will always be mission-critical services which require the highest uptime possible. You recognise these need best-of-breed infrastructure, without compromise: a VCE Vblock, for example, rather than an off-the-shelf DIY configuration. Yet these systems need to integrate seamlessly with your lower-availability workloads – ideally running on the same platform. How do you cover both ends of the spectrum without breaking IT operations into siloes?The solution lies in a managed-service approach to converged infrastructure. Our customers increasingly tell us they want full control over how they consume IT resources, particularly when it comes to costs and responsibility for day-to-day operations. At VCE, we both provide best-of-breed hardware (like Vblocks and VxRacks) and look after it as a fully managed offering, giving our customers the security of SLAs while allowing them to vary the levels of these agreements in an agile way.This is very different to your traditional model of IT outsourcing, where any change to your SLAs or other aspects of your configuration typically incurs an (let’s face it) unreasonably high cost. Those outsourcing models are in real danger of going extinct as more and more businesses adopt “utility” models for IT infrastructure. Although they may (but not always) cost more, the flexibility and control of spend compared to CapEx investments is increasingly worth it.Is your business taking a multi-level approach to SLAs and uptime?last_img read more

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first_img UNDERDOGS (By Gross) 5. Chicago ($413,434) 4. Pippin ($397,603) 3. Rock of Ages ($323,042) 2. This Is Our Youth ($322,033) 1. The Country House ($187,209) Here’s a look at who was on top—and who was not—for the week ending November 16: Source: The Broadway League Shows come and go on the Great White Way, but sometimes, the hottest tickets can stay hot for years. The Book of Mormon took the number one spot as Broadway’s top grossing show this past week, surpassing box office faves The Lion King, It’s Only a Play, Wicked and Aladdin. The Tony-winning tuner also reclaimed the top spot by capacity, beating out the Hugh Jackman-led The River and The Elephant Man starring Bradley Cooper (both of which still played Standing Room Only). The Elephant Man broke the box office record at the Booth Theatre for its first full week of performances, grossing $966,896. The record was previously held by the Bette Midler star vehicle I’ll Eat You Last, which grossed $890,276 for the week ending June 23, 2013. FRONTRUNNERS (By Capacity) 1. The Book of Mormon (102.61%) 2. The River (102.28%)** 3. The Elephant Man (101.39%)* 4. Beautiful: The Carole King Musical (100.17%) 5. A Delicate Balance (100.00%)* UNDERDOGS (By Capacity) 5. Les Miserables (64.90%) 4. Chicago (62.18%) 3. The Last Ship (61.60%) 2. Cinderella (60.81%) 1. This Is Our Youth (56.22%) FRONTRUNNERS (By Gross) 1. The Book of Mormon ($1,594,690) 2. The Lion King ($1,527,989) 3. It’s Only a Play ($1,370,168) 4. Wicked ($1,361,772) 5. Aladdin ($1,328,493) *Number based on eight preview performances **Number based on seven preview performances and one regular performance View Commentslast_img read more

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first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享GeekWire:Starbucks has struck a first-of-its-kind clean energy deal that will generate enough power to run 3,000 of its stores by 2021. To pull it off, the coffee giant worked with green energy marketplace LevelTen Energy to purchase stakes in two solar and one wind project across North Carolina, Oklahoma and Texas.Starbucks has invested in renewable resources since 2005 and reached its goal of using 100 percent renewable electricity to power its stores in 2015. Two years ago, the company took its first step into directly investing in renewables with a 260-acre solar plant in North Carolina that creates enough electricity to power 600 stores.The LevelTen deal represents a new approach to clean energy investments. Rather than signing up as the sole purchaser of electricity, as it did in the North Carolina deal, Starbucks owns a fraction of several projects that together create a portfolio. The new model “opens the door for many new buyers to cost-effectively source smaller amounts of renewable energy,” Patrick Leonard, an energy manager for Starbucks, said in a statement.LevelTen’s platform aims to make it easier for corporate buyers to shop around for clean energy projects. For Starbucks, spreading cash across several projects reduces the overall risk by diversifying a portfolio, much like any other investment. The added peace of mind could attract more companies to directly purchase renewable energy.Earlier this week, LevelTen raised $20.5 million to fuel the growth of its platform and expand its presence in North America and Europe.More: Starbucks taps Seattle startup LevelTen in first-of-its-kind clean energy deal New Starbucks contract should expand smaller companies’ access to green energylast_img read more

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first_imgThe girls then made dog beds by hand to be donated at the end of the project. Lillian Williams, Alanna Schiffer, Miranda Chiguma and Olivia Rouse all agreed it was a cause they wanted to help. The project began with the girls raising $500 dollars by selling Girl Scout cookies and magazines. BINGHAMTON (WBNG) – As a part of their Girl Scout silver project, Troop 30463 in Binghamton, raised money to help the Humane Society. It was an experience all four girls said they were happy to be a part of and all their hard work was worth completing their end goal and getting their award. “I enjoyed knowing it was going to help animals that needed the beds,” said Chiguma. The group used the remaining money to buy food, toys and other supplies the humane society was in need of. “We think that animals should be treated as well as humans do because if you’re a human wouldn’t you want to sleep on a bed,” said Rouse. last_img read more

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first_imgSANTA MARIA, Calif. (May 24) – A pair of $1,000 to win fea­tures for Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modified fea­tures are on programs for the May 28 and 29 Na­tionals at Santa Maria Raceway.Both Saturday and Sunday races are qualifying events for the Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational bal­lot. IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National, Larry Shaw Race Cars Western Region, Allstar Performance State and local track points will be awarded.Entry fee is $50. Pit passes are $40.Pit gates open at noon both days. The grandstand opens at 4 p.m. and racing starts at 6 p.m. Saturday, when grandstand admission is $20 for adults and $18 for students ages 13-17, seniors 55 and over and mili­tary personnel with ID.On Sunday, the grandstand opens at 3 p.m. and racing starts at 5 p.m. Spectator admission is $25 for adults and $23 for students, seniors and military.Kids ages 6-12 are $6 and five and under get in free both days. Pit passes are $40. Entry fee and tow money are $50.Camping, but no hookups, is available for $20 per night of $40 for Thursday through Monday. The number to call for tickets and camping reservations is 805 245-3585.More information is available at the www.santamariaraceway.com website.last_img read more

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first_imgPaul Lambert has tipped Jores Okore and Ciaran Clark to push for regular first-team football, even when Aston Villa solve their defensive injury crisis. Lambert hailed Okore for adapting quickly after his return from 14 months battling knee ligament trouble, admitting hopes the 22-year-old can continue to thrive alongside Clark. “Our defensive effort was terrific at Selhurst Park,” said Lambert. “Okore and Clark worked very well together, Alan Hutton was outstanding too, and with (Brad) Guzan and (Aly) Cissokho formed a strong unit there. “For Okore it’s his third game in quick succession, and he’s been out for more than a year. “And I think Ciaran Clark certainly: the two of them have certainly stepped up their game. “That’s the aim of football, to have selection conundrums, and those two are going to give me that when others return. “You’ve got to push a mate to get into a side, and at the minute these two lads are holding their own.” Holland defender and Villa captain Vlaar remains sidelined with calf trouble, while former Arsenal man Senderos is fighting a shin problem. Okore and Clark forged a resilient central defensive pairing in Villa’s 1-0 Premier League victory at Crystal Palace on Tuesday night. The makeshift duo battled manfully amid the continued absence of long-term injury trio Ron Vlaar, Philippe Senderos and Nathan Baker. Baker is out with a knee injury, and Villa boss Lambert is still awaiting return dates for all three. Former England midfielder Joe Cole joined Villa’s walking wounded on Tuesday, limping out after just 20 minutes with hamstring trouble. Lambert’s men host Leicester at Villa Park on Saturday, with the Scottish boss admitting Cole is a doubt. Former Borussia Dortmund and Scotland midfielder Lambert admitted he will continue to stave off the stress of top-flight management, aiming to hide his relief after Villa ended their nine-match winless streak. “It’s a blow (Cole’s injury) because I thought he was outstanding in our 1-1 draw at Burnley,” said Lambert. “I’ll handle this the same as I always do, I don’t change. “You try to keep your level, try not to have any stress, which is a hard thing to do. “So I’ll just keep focused and try to do my best for this football club, and that’s why I’m here. “I know you’ll say nine games without winning, but in the last four games we’ve not been beaten. “So it’s whatever way you want to perceive it, and I tend to look at the positive. “I’m delighted for the lads, because they’ve come through a period where people were giving them criticism, and as I’ve said before this is Aston Villa Football Club; it’s big news. “I’m delighted for them: they’ve earned their plaudits.” Press Associationlast_img read more

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first_imgDick Advocaat is refusing to contemplate an extended stay at Sunderland until he has completed his survival mission. The 67-year-old Dutchman was parachuted in with nine games of the season remaining as the Black Cats rolled up their sleeves for a second successive battle to stay in the top flight. Six games into his reign, head coach Advocaat has collected 10 of the 18 points on offer, but has still not managed to edge the club over the finishing line ahead of Saturday’s home clash with in-form Leicester. However, despite being installed as the bookmakers’ favourite – West Ham’s Sam Allardyce appears second in the list, although he is understood not to be a contender – to secure the job beyond the confines of his current contract, the former Holland boss will not even consider the matter until the battle is completed. He said: “I think it’s better to wait until after next weekend.” Gus Poyet’s replacement would receive popular support if he were to indicate his continuing availability after dragging the club back from the brink with successive victories over Southampton and Everton after a derby win against Newcastle and a point at Stoke. However, he modestly insists that even if the club does book a place in next season’s Premier League, his contribution will only have been part of the equation. He said: “If we stay up, then that’s the success of the club, for everybody who works for the club, and we are part of that. “I have to be very fair to the players, the way they train, the way they work during the games. We are very positive about that so in that way, I have no complaints at all about the players. “Enjoyment is helped by winning games. That means the work you are doing is more enjoyable than when you lose. “The last six games have been rather good, winning three games and one draw. We have only lost two. The performances and the results are okay, but we still have to do it, and that’s the reason we are here.” Press Association Sunderland will have to turn in another good performance if they are to get any change out of Leicester with the Foxes having won six of their last seven games in a remarkable fightback. Advocaat admits he did not know a great deal about the club or their manager Nigel Pearson before he arrived in England, but he knows a lot more about both now. He said with a smile: “To be honest, if somebody said anything about Leicester, I always thought about Gary Lineker – honestly. “But they have done really well, to be fair to the manager. Six out of seven, that’s very positive. It’s always a cooperation between players and management staff, and he’s always calm – most of the time, he is calm. “He looks very bright and he knows what he’s doing, and if you win six out of seven, then you are doing a great job. “But we will give them, tomorrow, a very difficult time.” Advocaat, however, will be without midfielder Jordi Gomez, whose two nerveless penalties secured a 2-1 victory over Southampton, after a niggling knee problem was diagnosed as a fractured patella which will sideline him for up to six weeks. In addition, central defender Wes Brown is unlikely to play again this season after suffering a reaction to his return from a long-standing knee problem last weekend, although John O’Shea’s availability following a rib injury softens that blow. Nigel Pearson insists Leicester will go for the kill at Sunderland with the Foxes on the brink of a stunning recovery. A win over the Black Cats, and Hull dropping points at Tottenham, would see Leicester become just the third side to survive in the Premier League after being bottom at Christmas. A draw on Saturday would be good enough if Hull lost at White Hart Lane and would cap a remarkable survival bid. Leicester – who are three points above the drop zone with two games left – have won six out of their last seven games and, with safety so close, manager Pearson will not change their plans. “We’re not all of a sudden going to be changing our preparation. You have to be flexible enough to change enough during games,” said Pearson, who was assistant manager at West Brom in 2005 when they survived after being bottom at Christmas. “I’d rather draw than lose but because of our circumstances over the last two months draws are not as beneficial, especially against sides around you. “Our preparation will be along the same lines it has been of late, which will be to produce the type of performance we have had in the last couple of months. “It’s not as simple as saying we want to go out there and play well, it does help when you have a fit squad and we’ve had that for vast majority of the season.” But Matty James has been ruled out for up to nine months with a crucial knee ligament injury while David Nugent misses the trip to the Stadium of Light with a calf problem, although Andy King (hamstring) is back. last_img read more

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