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first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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first_imgThe coronavirus has begun to take a toll not only on Indonesia’s tourist industry but also on exports, which could further cast a shadow on the country’s economic outlook.Indonesian Employers Association (Apindo) chairman Hariyadi Sukamdani said in Jakarta on Monday that Indonesia’s palm oil was among the commodities that had been affected as the virus outbreak had caused a delay in the commodity’s shipment to China, one of major buyers of Indonesia’s palm oil.With the decline of trade with China, one of Indonesia’s main trade partners, it would be difficult for the government to reach its economic growth target of 5.3 percent this year. “We expect economic growth will reach only 5 percent if the situation continues,” Hariyadi told reporters, adding that the country had lost about 1.7 million foreign tourists from China, whil… Google Log in with your social account Forgot Password ? Indonesia coronavirus impact exports imports APINDO Trade-Minister-Agus-Suparmanto live-animal Facebook Linkedin LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Topics :last_img read more

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first_imgForgot Password ? Facebook coronavirus Wuhan-coronavirus-in-Indonesia Wuhan-coronavirus Wuhan-coronavirus-stigma Chinese-Indonesians Log in with your social account Indonesian students returning from China and Chinese Indonesians have had to suffer the effects of misinformation about the novel coronavirus outbreak, which has caused a public stigma against the two groups.Adam Amrismafasyah, a 19-year-old student at Jiangsu Normal University thought he would be able to rest easy once he arrived in his hometown in Muaraenim regency, South Sumatra, on Saturday. However, he was met with with suspicion and outright paranoia from locals who were not convinced that he was free of the deadly virus.“Some of my neighbors have steered clear of me. Others have asked me upfront whether I had been thoroughly examined and whether I was completely free of the coronavirus,” Adam told The Jakarta Post in a phone interview on Tuesday.He said the situation grew even more uncomfortable after health officials visited his home. The officials were fu… LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Google Topics : Linkedinlast_img read more

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first_imgTopics : game traditional Tangerang slingshot festival Competition tournament sport Log in with your social account LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Forgot Password ? Facebook Google Sofyan, a 46-year-old resident of Kebayoran Lama, South Jakarta, felt nervous as he walked into a vacant lot in Paninggilan subdistrict in Tangerang, Banten, to participate in a slepetan (traditional slingshot) competition on Sunday.His hands were shaky and sweat dripped from his face as he prepared to face off against two other competitors.He needed to knock down 10 cans in front of him consecutively by slinging amo (iron pellets used as projectiles). However, his nerves got the better of him and he was only able to hit five targets.“Well, I have competed at several small-scale slepetan competitions before. I have practiced a lot at home, but for some reason the practice didn’t help, as I felt the pressure of being watched by so many people here [at the competition],” Sofyan told The Jakarta Post after his turn.Sofyan was one of 93 competitors… Linkedinlast_img read more

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first_imgVolunteers selected by the government through the State-Owned Enterprises (SOE) Ministry will begin working to help mitigate the impact of COVID-19 on March 23. Registration will close at midnight on Friday.  “The selected volunteers will receive guidance and training on Sunday and start work on Monday,” he said in a written statement on Friday.Healthy people in Greater Jakarta who are under 40 years old and single will be prioritized.In addition to accepting volunteers, the government is also accepting donations of rapid test equipment.As of Thursday, Indonesia has recorded 309 COVID-19 cases with 25 deaths, the highest death toll in Southeast Asia. Nearly 70 percent of COVID-19 deaths in the country have been recorded in Jakarta, according to the Jakarta administration.   President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo has also urged hospitals to prepare contingency plans in case they were overwhelmed by patients. Hospitals have been advised to use the athletes apartment complex in Kemayoran, Central Jakarta, which can accommodate 15,000 people, and state-owned hotels as emergency wards.Topics : The volunteers will be assigned to handle logistical and operational affairs in preparing alternative facilities for COVID-19 patients in case the current referral hospitals are no longer able to accommodate patients.They will be trained by the Indonesia Healthcare Corporation before carrying out their duties. In addition to that, they will also be equipped with protective gear and given health insurance while volunteering.SOE Minister Erick Thohir said the government would announce the selection results on Saturday.Read also: Indonesian SOE Ministry searches for volunteers to assist with coronavirus handlinglast_img read more

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first_img“We have also installed land-retaining walls [to prevent landslides] as well as other facilities and utilities in the housing complex,” said Lilik Lastantyo Adiarso, the head of the ministry’s specific non-vertical housing task force in Aceh, on Thursday.Read also: Indonesian fishermen grapple with climate changeThe ministry allocated Rp 6.4 billion (US$3,9 million) to build the 50 houses in Simeulue, as well as an additional Rp 713 million to build supporting facilities, such as a public road and clean water network.Lilik went on to say that the housing program was initiated to combat poverty.“We hope the local administration and fisherfolk living in these houses will find these facilities useful and also maintain them so the buildings won’t get abandoned” he said.Simeulue Regent Erli Hasim said the local administration had vowed to maintain the housing provided by the ministry. He went on to say that his office would work to relocate local fisherfolk to the housing complex immediately.The ministry announced in February that it had also provided 25 houses for fisherfolk in North Kayong regency, West Kalimantan. (trn)Topics : The Public Works and Housing Ministry handed over 50 homes measuring 28 square meters to fisherfolk living in Linggi village, East Simeulue district, Simeulue regency, Aceh, on Thursday.Such assistance was expected to help improve the welfare of fisherfolk in the village, as they now had a proper place to live.Each house comprises two bedrooms, a bathroom and living room, and is built from brick and concrete.last_img read more

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first_imgHe said his family normally counted on using the assistance they received during Ramadan to help them throughout the rest of the year.”This is the hardest Ramadan we have faced. We don’t know how we will cope,” he added.So far, there have been 17 officially declared cases of coronavirus in the Gaza Strip, an enclave of roughly two million people.That’s partly due to rapid measures taken by the local government, run by Islamist group Hamas, which has announced all mosques will remain closed throughout the holy month.  The Muslim holy month of Ramadan is a time for giving, with mosques and charities feeding thousands, but coronavirus has left many in the Gaza Strip wondering how they will manage this year.”The markets and mosques are closed. The good people who give us money or aid each Ramadan are facing a tough situation,” said 47-year-old Palestinian Salah Jibril, who is unemployed.He and his wife live with their six children in a cramped two-bedroom flat on the outskirts of Gaza City. Large public prayer gatherings will be banned, with people told to stay at home.Gaza’s population is almost exclusively Muslim.During Ramadan, the faithful refrain from consuming food and even water during the day, breaking their fast at sunset with family and in large groups.Mosques and other charitable organizations feed thousands of poor people during the month, while individuals often give large sums of money to help the impoverished — a donation known as zakat.But this year in the strip, large public meals are banned and no concrete announcements have been made about alternate arrangements. Donations are expected to be down due to the global economic crisis brought on by the coronavirus pandemic.Hamas announced this week it was giving $100 to 5,000 poor families in the strip ahead of Ramadan.Jibril’s was not among them. He receives around 1,800 shekels ($500) every four months from the local ministry of social affairs.”It isn’t enough to pay the electricity, water and gas bills, a well as the food and drinks, and medicine for when the kids are sick,” he said.The family has no detergents or sterilizers. A small bar of soap on a broken sink is all they have to keep their home clean.Umm Mohammed, Jibril’s wife, said she couldn’t remember when they last had enough money to buy meat.”Corona[virus] is worse than a war,” she said.Around 80 percent of the strip’s residents rely on aid, according to the United Nations.Fifty-year-old father of seven Abdullah al-Omreen used to earn a meager living selling fruit and vegetables in central Gaza, but is now unemployed.During Ramadan, “we receive alms from the rich and they also provide us meals daily. But this year the whole situation is different,” he said.”It will be difficult for everyone. I am afraid no one will give us anything.”The coronavirus crisis has increased calls for Israel to lift its crippling, almost 13-year-long blockade of the enclave that it insists is necessary to isolate Hamas.The Islamist group has fought three wars with Israel since 2008.The mood might be dampened, but many Gazans are still getting into the Ramadan spirit, putting up decorations on the front of their homes.”Despite the difficult economic situation due to the coronavirus, we decorate our homes with Ramadan lanterns,” said Moeen Abbas, owner of an ice cream shop.”We want our children to feel the atmosphere of the holy month.”center_img Topics :last_img read more

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first_imgTopics : Google Indonesia-waste-crisis indonesia-waste-management incinerator waste-to-energy Linkedin Log in with your social account LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Facebook Fifteen years have passed since an avalanche of waste at Leuwigajah landfill in Cimahi, West Java, killed at least 147 people—a tragedy that was not unheard of in Indonesia, a country that produces 64 million tons of waste annually.The waste crisis has yet to see the light at the end of the tunnel. Garbage continues to pile up in landfills across the country, many of which will soon run out of capacity.The Bantar Gebang dumpsite in Bekasi, West Java, which accommodates some 7,500 tons of waste per day from capital Jakarta, is not an exception. It is predicted to reach its maximum capacity of 49 million tons by 2021.Rather than pushing people to reduce consumption and sort their own waste at home, the government is pinning its hopes on incinerators, also known as waste-to-energy power plants (PLTSa), to solve the problem.Sluggish progress … Forgot Password ?last_img read more

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first_imgSaudi public sector employees will start returning to work gradually as of Sunday May 31, after more than two months of suspension amid strict measures to help curb the novel coronavirus outbreak.Public sector workers will eventually resume work as normal as of June 14, Minister of Human Resources Ahmed al-Rajhi said in a televised speech on Tuesday.On March 16, Saudi Arabia suspended work in all government sectors except health and security as part of the efforts to contain the pandemic. The government said on Monday it will begin easing restrictions on movement and travel this week.Restrictions will be lifted in three phases, culminating in the curfew completely ending from June 21, with the exception of the holy city of Mecca, the state news agency reported. Topics :last_img

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