Month: December 2019

first_img1 If you left Leeds for Norwich, you’re not coming in! – Hometown’s Cian Morrin takes our Starting XI Q&A Each week, a leading band or artist takes our special Starting XI Q&A. Up this week, Cian Morrin from Hometown…Who would be the most rock ‘n’ roll signing your club could make?Rock ‘n’ roll for Leeds? Realistically? Bring back Jermaine Beckford I say.If your club was a song or a lyric, what would it be?Falling Slowly.Which football stadium would you most like to play a gig at (that’s not your club’s home ground)?Craven Cottage, I like the look of the stadium. Which footballer has the most potential to be a rock star?Potential? Let’s go for Raheem Sterling.Brit award or Premier League trophy?Brit award.When you were a kid, which football and music posters did you have on your wall?Alan Smith, and Green Day.Elvis was the king of rock ‘n’ roll, Michael Jackson the king of pop… Who’s the king of football?Diego Maradona is the king.If you were in charge of your club’s dressing room stereo, what tunes would you put on before a big game and why?Fall Out Boy – Suger We’re Down; 30 Seconds to Mars – Kings and Queen.Which signing got you most excited and which player’s departure broke your heart?Most excited, probably El Hadji Diouf! Haha! Rio Ferdinand leaving was a bit of heartbreak. Which footballer would you refuse complimentary tickets to one of your gigs?Any player that left Leeds for Norwich. I’ll need plenty of security.What’s the best football song ever recorded?Marching on TogetherCheck out Hometown’s debut single ‘Where I Belong’ on YouTube right herelast_img read more

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first_img1 Arsenal star Theo Walcott celebrates Arsenal are the big winners so far this international break as three of their stars continued their good form.While Manchester City and Chelsea have lost players to injuries, Alexis Sanchez scored to help Chile defeat Brazil, Santi Cazorla hit a brace as Spain defeated Luxembourg and Theo Walcott got the opener as England beat Estonia 2-0.And the latter of the Gunners stars has really been putting on a show in recent weeks, with the strike at Wembley his seventh in nine games.But what do Arsenal fans, who were clamouring for a goalscorer at the end of the transfer window, think about his red-hot form?Check out what fans were saying on Twitter below…last_img

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first_img Chelsea manager Jose Mourinho shares a tender moment with Manchester United boss Louis van Gaal 1 Who’d be a manager?Two-time Champions League winning boss Jose Mourinho is reportedly on the cusp of a Chelsea exit after the Blues’ dreadful start to the season, while Manchester United fans are yet to be fully convinced that Louis van Gaal is the man to take the club forward.But who is the better coach?Cast your votes below…last_img

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first_imgtalkSPORT’s transfer guru, Warren Haughton, joins Hawksbee and Jacobs to round up all the very latest rumours and gossip from the January window.On the agenda today is Andros Townsend’s £12m move to Newcastle from Tottenham after Daniel Levy agreed to drop his asking price from £14m.Staying in the north-east, Sunderland are thought to be interested in bringing Swansea forward Andre Ayew to the Stadium of Light with a potential swap deal involving Fabio Borini.Warren also discusses Kasper Schmeichel’s future and whether there is any truth in the rumours that he is set to replace David De Gea at Manchester United.There is also the latest on Emmanuel Adebayor to Crystal Palace, Mario Suarez to Watford and Seydou Doumbia to Leicester City.Here are the latest transfer stories from talkSPORT.com:Transfer news: Newcastle agree £12m deal with Tottenham for winger Andros Townsend Burak Yilmaz hands in transfer request at Galatasaray amid interest from West Ham Watford transfer report: Hornets step up Suarez pursuit Exclusive – Kasper Schmeichel to Liverpool? ‘Impossible’, says Leicester team-mate Mark Schwarzer Leicester transfer latest: Inter Milan to battle Foxes for signing of £10m-rated striker Eder Crystal Palace transfer news: Hull midfielder Mo Diame on Alan Pardew’s radar Transfer report: Napoli set to land Real Madrid defender Nacho after Arsenal decide against movelast_img read more

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first_imgHarry Redknapp believes Chelsea will be losing an invaluable player in the dressing room at the end of the season when John Terry leaves the club.The player, 35, has decided to exit Stamford Bridge once the current campaign finishes and his contract runs out.But Redknapp reckons the centre-back still has value as an experienced leader and should have been kept on by the Blues for another year, even if he wasn’t playing week in, week out.He told Drivetime: “John Terry is the finest captain, along with Tony Adams, since Bobby Moore, in the English game.“He’ll be a massive loss when he leaves Chelsea. Eventually it’s got to come to an end. He can’t play forever but I think he’s such a leader and such a winner [he could play on].“The lad Kurt Zouma has come into the team and been playing alongside him, learning the game and learning off of John. It’s invaluable even if he doesn’t play every week next year.“At least the young players in the team [can learn from him]. He’s a talker, he’s an organiser, he could teach the young lads so much about the game.”And, in the future, Redknapp believes Terry could eventually take charge of Chelsea.“I don’t see why John couldn’t [be a manager],” he added.“Given the opportunity and with the right people around him, someone like Ray Wilkins to work alongside him and help him through his first managerial job.“I don’t see why he couldn’t manage Chelsea, personally.”last_img read more

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first_img Stuart O’Keefe scored the second for Cardiff 1 A goal in each half from Lex Immers and Stuart O’Keefe gave Cardiff the Severnside bragging rights with a 2-0 Sky Bet Championship win at Bristol City.A sell-out crowd of 15,758 for the noon kick-off saw Cardiff take a 21st minute lead when Joe Ralls was allowed space to deliver a low cross from the left of the box and Immers swept home a low drive from 12 yards at the far post.Any doubt about the result was removed seven minutes from time when O’Keefe headed home from close range after a Tom Lawrence shot had been tipped onto the bar by Richard O’Donnell.With Bruno Ecuele Manga outstanding at the back, Cardiff repelled Bristol’s attacks and emerged worthy winners.The visitors posed the first threat when Immers volleyed wide at the near post on five minutes and were the quicker to settle.Nathan Baker headed over from a Lee Tomlin corner on 16 minutes as Bristol began to get into their stride.Then came Immers’ goal, which was not the first time the hosts had looked vulnerable at the back, and Cardiff defended their lead well until the break.The biggest moment of anxiety for David Marshall came from a 28th minute volley from Jonathan Kodjia, but the angle was narrow and the Bluebirds goalkeeper beat the effort away.Anthony Pilkington, operating as a lone striker for Cardiff, beat the offside trap on 38 minutes and advanced menacingly, only to see his low shot from 25 yards palmed wide by the diving O’Donnell.Bristol were finding it hard to get behind a well-organised Cardiff defence and Kodjia, like Pilkington in a lone role up front, was unable to hold the ball up effectively.The home side’s frustration was demonstrated when Tomlin collected a booking for dissent as the players left the field at the break.Cardiff were forced into a change at the start of the second half, with Sean Morrison replacing right-back Lee Peltier. Morrison slotted into central defence with Matt Connolly moving across to the right.Bristol made a tactical switch pushing Tomlin up alongside Kodjia, who frustrated home fans by delaying his cross when behind the defence on 50 minutes.Tomlin was the biggest threat for Bristol City and his deflected 55th minute shot brought a smart save from Marshall.The Cardiff keeper was in action again on 70 minutes, diving to his right to palm away Tomlin’s free kick from 30 yards.Bristol were on top for the first time and Scott Golbourne’s shot from distance flashed just wide.But O’Keefe’s goal eased any late pressure on Cardiff, who continued their impressive move towards the play-off places as a late header from substitute Aaron Wilbraham passed harmlessly over Marshall’s crossbar.last_img read more

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first_imgBut then a strange thing happened: We met. And we talked. And we shared the epic tales of our pasts – of our victories and losses; of our nervous habits and favorite movies; of Guangzhou (pronounced “gwong-joe”) and Torrance. And how strange, how unexpected – we found that we truly liked each other! Needless to say, I feel completely ignoble now over my earlier mistaken assumptions. Because maybe she isn’t a religious follower of Vogue. And maybe she wasn’t the captain of a cheer team. But how many people can say their roommate is fluent in four languages? Or that their roommate comes from halfway around the world? Or that they shared in their roommate’s first experiences with assorted new American customs? One of my favorite “firsts” we experienced together was our trip to an amusement park. She had never been on a roller coaster and, at first, she refused to change that fact. But, with a little persuasion and reassurance, I finally coaxed her into “taking the plunge.” So to speak. After an hour of nearly unbearable, nerve- and anxiety-ridden waiting, we reached the boarding point. Once strapped in, I grabbed her hand and squeezed it in a gesture of support; she refused to let go. Heart palpitating and fist clutched firmly to the bar, stomach knotting more with each clink, clink, clink of the cart, I could sense the precipice was soon to be reached. I turned my head to the right – I could see the denim-hued dusk sky, vast trees and rolling hills, and my roommate’s eyes, firmly shut in a refusal to witness the insanity of what was about to happen. We reached the apex. The gut-wrenching, logic-defying drop was inevitable. In the moments following – the moments we were suspended in midair, hands clasped tightly together – I was overcome with a feeling of joy that my roommate was who she was, and not any fashion guru from Manhattan or the Champs Elysees. Sure, we are from completely different worlds. But it has been because of our differences that our relationship has become such an eye-opening adventure. Patti Sponaugle is a Torrance High School graduate writing about her freshman year at Kenyon College. She can be reached at sponauglep@kenyon.edu. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREChargers go winless in AFC West with season-ending loss in Kansas City“You mean call China? Yeah. Right. What would we even talk about?” The day I found out my roommate was from China, I was pretty surprised. Of course, I have friends from every ethnic background imaginable, so it wasn’t like I was opposed to sharing my living space with an international student. It’s just that for the longest time, I had a fixed idea of what college should be, and having a roommate from the Asian mainland was definitely not part of those plans. For me, college meant daily intellectual conversations over Kafka and Socrates, followed by parties with live bands and free-flowing drinks. Most importantly, it meant having a roommate from somewhere fashionable, like New York or even Paris, to show me the ropes so I could become the charming and popular sophisticate that every college girl naturally should be. Or so I thought. It seemed to me, at the time, that having a roommate from China was the same as being sentenced to the opposite of all of my previous aspirations. I eagerly ripped open the envelope and withdrew the contents. Papers were thrown asunder; I vigorously paced the room – searching, searching. Then there was a pause. “Gwang-joo? Gong-joe? How do you even pronounce that? Gwain-choo?” I asked with breathless incredulity. “Well, why don’t you call her and ask?” my mom offered. last_img read more

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first_imgHOLLYWOOD – Reruns appeared likely today to begin running much sooner than expected as an outcome of the writers’ strike, which is now in its fourth day. The networks had estimated that a backlog of finished scripts and completed episodes would keep most series on the air until early 2008. But with numerous show runners refusing to supervise nonwriting services on their programs — duties that include overseeing casting, editing and directing — production has stopped on several leading series, and the supply of new episodes of a number of shows will dry up around Thanksgiving. Show runners, as they are called in the industry, have the dual roles of determining a show’s creative direction and answering to the studios. The premiere is being postponed so the series can air uninterrupted in its entirety, a network executive said. In place of “24”, Fox will air “Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles,” a new series based on the “Terminator” movie franchise, Monday nights at 9 p.m., beginning Jan. 14. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREStriving toward a more perfect me: Doug McIntyre Without the cooperation of the show runners, networks were forced to shut down or sharply curtail production of series they had hoped to keep going for weeks or even months. “When we’re off the job, pretty much everything stops,” Marc Cherry, creator and executive producer of “Desperate Housewives,” said while on the picket lines yesterday. In staging a very public rally in front of Walt Disney Studios in Burbank yesterday, the 100 or so writer-producers of some of TV’s highest-rated programs ratcheted up the pressure on the studios and producers who only a day before had threatened to withdraw scores of lucrative contracts with writers. By coming out in support of the Writers Guild of America, TV’s top writer-producers may have hastened the disappearance of some of the nation’s most popular prime-time shows, including “Desperate Housewives,” “Lost” and “The Office.” Additionally, the scheduled Jan. 13 season premiere of “24” has been postponed because of the writers’ strike, Fox Broadcasting announced today. last_img read more

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first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! RALEIGH, N.C. – Six out of the seven college students killed last month in a beach house fire had alcohol in their systems, although a prosecutor said he doesn’t believe drinking played a role in the deaths. The blood-alcohol levels ranged from .16 percent to .29 percent, Dr. John Butts, the state’s chief medical examiner, said Friday. The legal limit for driving in North Carolina is .08 percent, and Butts said the alcohol levels may have affected the students’ coordination and “their ability to respond.” But Brunswick County District Attorney Rex Gore dismissed the suggestion that drinking contributed to the deaths. He noted there was no trace of alcohol in the seventh victim. Six other students staying at the house were able to escape the blaze, and at least two did so by jumping from a window. “It’s a tragedy when they have those levels of alcohol,” Gore said. “But I haven’t seen anything to indicate that was a major contributing factor to the fire or to the chances of survival.” AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREStriving toward a more perfect me: Doug McIntyre Investigators have said the cause of the fire is undetermined, but they were unable to rule out improperly discarded cigarettes.last_img read more

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first_imgA study last year out of Germany showed that babies as young as 18 months old overwhelmingly helped out when they could, such as by picking up toys that researchers dropped. David Lewkowicz, a psychology professor at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton who wasn’t part of the study, said the Yale research was intriguing. But he doesn’t buy into the natural ability part. He said the behavior was learned, and that the new research doesn’t prove otherwise. “Infants acquire a great deal of social experience between birth and 6 months of age and thus the assumption that this kind of capacity does not require experience is simply unwarranted,” Lewkowicz told The Associated Press in an e-mail. But the Yale team has other preliminary research that shows similar responses even in 3-month-olds, Hamlin said. Researchers also want to know if the behavior is limited to human infants. The Yale team is starting tests with monkeys, but has no results yet, Hamlin said.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! WASHINGTON – Even infants can tell the difference between naughty and nice playmates, and know which to choose, a new study finds. Babies as young as 6 to 10 months old showed crucial social judging skills before they could talk, according to a study by researchers at Yale University’s Infant Cognition Center published in today’s journal Nature. The infants watched a googly-eyed wooden toy trying to climb roller-coaster hills and then another googly-eyed toy come by and either help it over the mountain or push it backward. They then were presented with the toys to see which they would play with. Nearly every baby picked the helpful toy over the bad one. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREPettersson scores another winner, Canucks beat KingsThe babies also chose neutral toys – ones that didn’t help or hinder – over the naughty ones. And the babies chose the helping toys over the neutral ones. “It’s incredibly impressive that babies can do this,” said study lead author Kiley Hamlin, a Yale psychology researcher. “It shows that we have these essential social skills occurring without much explicit teaching.” There was no difference in reaction between the boys and girls, but when the researchers took away the large eyes that made the toys somewhat lifelike, the babies didn’t show the same social judging skills, Hamlin said. The choice of nice over naughty follows a school of thought that humans have some innate social abilities, not just those learned from their parents. “We know that they’re very, very social beings from very, very early on,” Hamlin said. last_img read more

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