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first_imgDear Editor,It is with great sadness that I learnt of the passing of Basil Butcher. Butcher was one of the world’s best batsman in his day.Cricket lovers who had the good fortune of seeing him bat would never forget his beautiful on-drive. When he played it, not a fielder moved as the ball, more often than not, raced to the boundary.Basil B, as he was fondly known, came to prominence with Rohan Kanhai and Joe Solomon, all from Port Mourant, all world-class batsmen.I fondly recall his 209 not out at Trent Bridge in England in which he not just saved the West Indies, but snatched, for his team, victory from the jaws of defeat!I still recall the screaming headlines in our newspaper the next day ‘Butchery at Trent Bridge’ a most apt headline.Later in his career, he also became a deadly spin bowler.Maybe his biggest misfortune was that he, a giant, came to prominence at a time when two other giants were dominating West Indies batting, Rohan Kanhai and Garfield Sobers. At his best, he was their equal.I extend the deepest sympathy to his family and will forever be thankful for the joy he brought to our lives.Sincerely,Donald RamotarFormer Presidentlast_img read more

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first_imgSince Madam Ellen Johnson Sirleaf became President of Liberia, this gone 167th Independence Day celebration has been considered as the poorest in terms of involvement of ordinary citizens in the celebration in Nimba County.There was no county-level activity held across Nimba County in commemoration of the occasion by the local government in Nimba.The day began in Ganta with a parade by a group of Christians who later surrounded the main square of Ganta with a powerful prayer against the deadly Ebola virus.Groups of children turned out at every corner of Ganta for the celebration, but their numbers were not as high as compared to last year’s celebration.Patronage at night clubs and other entertainment centers, especially during the night hours, was also poor, something many blamed on economic hardship and the fear of Ebola.Fatu Kehzey, proprietress of F2 Business Center in Ganta, said, ”People are not buying this season as compared to last year. Everybody complaining about hardship in line with the coming opening of school. People are not coming to the club to buy”.The streets of Ganta are usually jammed packed during such  occasions as July 26, Christmas and New Year Day, and police officers have to be deployed everywhere to maintain law and order. This year, no police presence was observed.“I think, the poor observance this day is due to the news of Ebola virus,” said Emmanuel Freeman, a radio announcer.Victoria Var: “Since I started selling this morning I have not received any good customer yet. People are not buying.”“We give thanks be to God that we have lived to see this day, but things are not easy as compared to years back, because people are not buying.  The street is poor and we don’t really know the actual know the problem, whether money or the Ebola,” said Lovett, a raosted fish seller.At an Old Timers game between Nimba and Gbarpolu, organized by Senator Armah Jallah, Nimba was defeated 1-0.Senator Jallah told reporters that the game was an acquaintance game to bring the citizens of Nimba and Gbarpolu together, because Gbarpulu has huge numbers of Nimbaians.  But critics says Senator Jallah is eyeing the presidency come the  2017 general election.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_imgWhen President Sirleaf took office in January 2016, we were promised electricity within 6 months. I don’t know who’s bright idea that was but at the time I thought the promise a little over ambitious. But it’s been 9 years now, and we still have not reached Nirvana.Electricity is the mother’s milk of development. Without it, the economy cannot grow at the pace it should. And with the slow down brought about by the Ebola epidemic, the need for solving the electricity problem has become even more urgent. If we can bring plenty of cheap, reliable, stable electricity into Liberia, we stand a fighting chance of pulling in investment, and investment means jobs and a reduction in the high levels of unemployment that has taken hold of this country. It’s that simple.So, why, then, has it proven so difficulty to slay the electricity dragon? I suggest the principal obstacle has been our mindset. When the transitional government came to town in October 2003, I was member of a small delegation that visited US ambassador John Blaney, whom I considered to be a true friend of Liberia. We requested, amongst other things, for US assistance to bring electricity into Monrovia. His response took us completely by surprise. He said that the US government would not spend one cent of its taxpayers’ money on electricity in Liberia. They would spend money on education, healthcare, security, DDRR, agriculture and other social services but they would not spend one brass cent on electricity. I went into shock.”Why?” we asked. “Because we believe that there are private companies that can get the job done. Governments don’t do electricity these days. Even in the United States, electricity is provided by private companies. In fact, not only are we not going to spend any of our taxpayers’ money on electricity, we don’t think you should spend any of your taxpayers’ money on electricity either. For starters, you don’t have enough money to get the job done”. He was right about that. At the time, the entire Liberian government budget was only US$80 million. Well, he got me thinking. Up to that point, I had equated electricity with LEC. I assumed, like most Liberians, that solving the electricity problem required government pumping oodles and oodles of money into LEC. But John Blaney gave me cause to re-examine my assumptions. So, when Chairman Bryant appointed a small group of us to a committee headed by Professor Willie Belleh to deal with the telephone problem (conflicting signals, many companies and individuals claiming to have telecom licenses, lack of competition, etc.), we decided to go the private sector route.We asked the World Bank for assistance but issued two warnings: we did not want to borrow any money and we did not want to revive LTC, the public corporation known colloquially as “Telecom” that had a monopoly on telecom services in the country. Telecom was flat on its back. As a result of the war, its infrastructure had been virtually destroyed. It had no equipment, no money and a limited pool of skilled manpower. Instead, we asked for help to bring competition to the telecommunications market. The Bank obliged. They sent a young Ghanaian electronic engineer who advised us on how to issue GSM licenses (it was his opinion that our market could only sustain 3 companies but that we should license the 4 that had invested in facilities and leave it to the market to determine who would survive and who would die. Judging by what happened to Libercell, he was right on the money).Today, 10 years later, we see the results of that fateful decision we made a decade ago. At its height, LTC had only 5,000 telephone lines in the whole country. Now, we have close to 2 million GSM subscribers. Every man and his dog has a cell phone. And the cost of telephony keeps decreasing as the GSM companies throw kpeetee on the airwaves. Sim cards used to cost $65; international calls, $1.00/minute. The network that carries all this traffic has cost hundreds of millions of dollars. And how much has the Government of Liberia invested? Zip, nada, zilch. But more than that, the GSM companies are amongst the biggest taxpayers to GOL today. Sounds like a great susu club to me. You invest nothing and reap millions and millions of dollars from the club every year.Next week I will explore how our telecom model might be applied to electricity.The writer is a businessman. He can be reached at .Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_imgThe Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation has revealed that the vacancy for the position of a senior department head was advertised prior to his demotion some time ago.Guyana Times reported on Sunday that the former Director of Medical and Professional Services, Dr Sheik Amir was demoted from his substantive post. A source at the hospital informed this publication that there seemed to be an ongoing purging of senior management.Attention was pointed to the recent demotion of Dr Amir, who was the Director of Medical and Professional Services. Dr Amir, who has served the Corporation for over 19 years, is a decorated surgeon. The reasons behind his demotion are unclear. Dr Amir’s post was given to an orthopaedic surgeon, who spends approximately one-third of the year on missions in Belize.In an attempt to refute Guyana Times’ article, the GPHC admitted that Dr Amir’s job was advertised while he held the position and that he was eligible to apply.“Dr Sheik Amir served his entire tenure as DMPS and that it was at the conclusion of his contract, in accordance with best practice, the vacancy was advertised in all the daily newspapers…inviting qualified medical professionals, including Dr Amir to apply,” the institution stated.While Amir, who served in the position, did apply along with three others, he was interviewed, but the position was nonetheless given to someone else.“Four individuals, (names deliberately withheld) including Dr Amir applied and were all interviewed by an independent panel which consisted of personnel from the Board of Directors, the Ministry of Public Health, the University of Guyana School of Medicine and the GPHC administration. At the completion of this process the best candidate was selected,” the hospital said in a press release on Monday.Dr Amir’s demotion comes weeks after former Director of Facilities, Andy Mahadeo resigned. A source close to Mahadeo confirmed that the director was pressured into resigning. He served the Corporation for nearly five years in managerial posts and has both a Bachelor’s Degree in Engineering and a Master’s Degree.last_img read more

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first_imgIn January, the median price of a single-family home in the valley went down to $587,900, compared to $620,000 a year ago, a 5.2 percent decrease, according to the association. The median price of a condominium was $360,000 in January, the association stated. In January 2006 it was 9.3 percent higher, at $397,000. There were 73 condominium sales last month, compared with 82 in January 2006, a difference of 11 percent. Unlike in recent months, sellers are less likely to dip their toes in the market and pick up the for-sale sign if they cannot get their asking price, said Pam Ingram, with Remax of Santa Clarita. “I think the market has definitely picked back up,” Ingram said. “I don’t see that prices are going up a lot, but they’re also not going down. I’ve seen prices level off, but the buyers are back out buying. It looks like it’s going to be a good year.” SANTA CLARITA – The home sales market is returning to normal, not generating spectacular profits but staying solid, real estate experts said. Sales of single-family homes in the Santa Clarita Valley were up 11.7 percent in January compared with a year ago. The month saw escrows close on 172 houses, compared with 154 in January 2006. The market is expected to be steady in the year ahead. “It’s not going to be like it was the last two or three years, where we were seeing huge numbers of sales and huge price increases,” said Larry Gasinski, president of the Santa Clarita Valley division of the Southland Regional Association of Realtors Inc. There is more than a seven-month inventory of homes on the market, while about a six-month inventory is considered a balanced market. alex.dobuzinskis@dailynews.com (661) 257-5253160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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first_imgNash’s agent, David Canter, told the AP that Nash had four physicals since 2004 and was in good health. He said the Broncos planned their own investigation. Ilgauskas backCleveland center Zydrunas Ilgauskas returned to the Cavaliers’ starting lineup in Miami on Sunday for the first time since his wife went into early labor and lost twin babies. Ilgauskas missed four games. His wife, Jennifer, began having problems after Cleveland played the Lakers on Feb. 11. She was about five months’ pregnant at the time, and delivered a stillborn boy and girl on Feb. 14, Ilgauskas said. He said losing the babies was the toughest thing he’s ever experienced. “It puts life in perspective,” he said. Wade updateHeat guard Dwyane Wade will seek a second opinion early this week before deciding whether to rehabilitate his dislocated left shoulder or have season-ending surgery to repair the joint. If Wade chooses the rehab option, he could return to Miami’s lineup in about six weeks, or with around 10 regular-season games remaining. Sacramento forward Ron Artest missed the Kings’ game Sunday night against the Indiana Pacers, his former team. Artest was not with the team for personal reasons, a team spokesman said without elaborating. Artest was not listed on the injury report. Knicks leading rebounder David Lee sat out New York’s game Sunday night against the New Jersey Nets with a sprained right ankle and muscle strain. Venus motivatedVenus Williams has a message for anyone who thought she might use her latest injury as an excuse to finally leave tennis. She’s back, and she plans on working her way back up to an elite level. “I love a challenge,” Williams said. She hadn’t played competitive tennis since last October because of an injured left wrist and had pulled out of four events, including the Australian Open won last month by her sister, Serena. She returned to action at the Cellular South Cup in Memphis, a Tier III event, hoping to work herself back into shape. The 26-year-old Williams did more than that, playing well enough to win the event Saturday night, improving her footwork and cutting down on her own mistakes with each match. “I really have nothing to prove,” Williams said. “I feel like I understand what I have to do, myself, as far as my talent. I understand how hard I’ve worked. “And I think, time and again, Serena and I have, when we’ve come back from injury, we’ve come back just as good – if not better.” In Saturday night’s final, she dismissed 17th-ranked Shahar Peer of Israel, 6-1, 6-1 in 68 minutes with a display of the power she so loves in winning her 34th career title and first since Wimbledon in 2005. Former U.S. Open semifinalist Joachim Johansson, one of the fastest servers in tennis, had shoulder surgery and is expected to be out at least three months. BrieflyQuarterback A.J. Feeley and the Philadelphia Eagles agreed on a three-year contract extension. Chelsea won the League Cup soccer final with a 2-1 victory over Arsenal, getting two goals from Didier Drogba in Cardiff, Wales. Barcelona moved two points ahead of Sevilla in the Spanish soccer league after stopping Athletic Bilbao 3-0 in Madrid. Soccer fans and riot police fought after a game between Belgrade rivals in Serbia, leaving at least 13 people injured and 27 arrested. Red Star fans were angered by their team’s 4-2 loss to Partizan on Saturday. They built barricades with garbage bins downtown as police on horseback charged them, witnesses said. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Damien Nash had just come home from a charity basketball game he’d organized in his brother’s honor when he collapsed in front of his wife and 7-month-old girl. The Denver Broncos’ running back died Saturday and the cause remained unclear Sunday, but his grieving mother knows what she must do. Damien Nash collapsed in his suburban St. Louis home after returning by limousine with his wife, Judy Nash, and their daughter from a game at his high school to benefit The Darris Nash Find a Heart Foundation. The organization raises money for heart transplant research. The 24-year-old player was taken by ambulance to Christian Hospital Northeast, where he was pronounced dead. The St. Louis County medical examiner’s office said results of Sunday’s autopsy may not be known for days, even weeks. Dr. Gregory Ewald, a cardiologist, treated 25-year-old Darris Nash and said he had a weakened heart muscle condition known as dilated cardiomyopathy. The ailment can be caused by a viral infection, inflammation or other causes. Darris Nash became so ill he needed a mechanical device to support his circulation until he could get a transplant. Ewald said some cardiomyopathy conditions run in families. He said he never met Damien Nash, but “the fact that Damien was doing high-level athletics may indicate that was not the problem.” center_img After one son’s death and a heart ailment that caused another son to require a transplant last year, Kim Nash is taking her daughter to a cardiologist next week. “My son,” she told The Associated Press amid sobs, “is giving me the strength right now to talk.” last_img read more

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first_imgPhotos LBSU vs UC Irvine ANAHEIM – What had all the appearance of a basketball game that was going to be an affair of the nip ‘n tuck variety needed just 4 minutes to change complexion Friday night in the Anaheim Convention Center. That’s how long it took the Long Beach State 49ers to seize a 13-point advantage early in the second half against UC Irvine Anteaters and then push themselves into tonight’s Big West Conference title game with a 77-63 victory. The 49ers, with their first trip to the NCAA Tournament since 1995 on the line, will take on Cal Poly or Cal State Fullerton in the 8 p.m. final. Coach Larry Reynolds’ team improved to 23-7 while getting double-figure scoring from four players, led by forward Sterling Byrd, who had game highs with 20 points and 11 rebounds while blocking a couple of Nic Campbell jump shots for good measure. The 49ers, who lost to Pacific on the same floor a year ago, will be playing in a second consecutive conference championship for the first time since 1978. They beat San Jose State in the ’77 title game and lost to Fullerton the following March. Big West Player of the Year Aaron Nixon of Long Beach was limited to 27 minutes because of foul problems (he scored 16 points and had four assists before fouling out with 2:39 to go) and first-team all-conference selection Kejuan Johnson scored a career low four points in 33 minutes. But the 49ers’ got more than enough offensive production elsewhere, as Kevin Houston and Dominique Ricks, with 11 points apiece, joined Nixon and Byrd in double figures. Mark Dawson and Louis Darby scored six points apiece off the bench, while sophomore Artis Gant, who had hit just two of 20 shots behind the arc on the season, banked in 3-pointer three seconds before the halftime buzzer to give the 49ers a 38-35 lead at intermission. center_img “When teams try to take Aaron and Kejuan away from us, we have other guys who can step up and hit shots,” Byrd said. A Nixon 3-pointer with 15:32 to go capped a 12-2 run to start the second half and Long Beach never led by fewer than 10 points the rest of the way. “It was good to get out and get playing,” Reynolds said, referring to his team drawing a bye into the semifinals after Irvine had played the previous two evenings to advance that far. “Obviously we had a little rust in the first half and didn’t shoot well. But I thought our guys did a good job of taking the ball to the basket to create free-throw opportunities (they were 22 of 29 from the free-throw line for the night). And we came out with some pizzazz and fight in us in the second half.” Irvine (15-18) had shot more than 50 percent from the field in both games while handing the 49ers their last conference loss (88-84 on Jan. 25) and losing an 85-80 decision in the Walter Pyramid on March 1. But Reynolds’ team played some of its best half-court defense of the season while holding the Anteaters to .426, in large part because they missed 16 of 23 shots after intermission. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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first_imgDIPLOMACY: Mahmoud Ahmadinejad strikes a defiant pose at the U.N. regarding his nation’s nuclear program. By Edith M. Lederer THE ASSOCIATED PRESS UNITED NATIONS – Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad declared Tuesday that Iran’s disputed nuclear program is closed as a political issue and said Tehran will ignore a U.N. Security Council demand imposed by “arrogant powers” that it halt uranium enrichment. He told world leaders at the U.N. General Assembly that Iran has decided to pursue the monitoring of its nuclear program “through its appropriate legal path,” the International Atomic Energy Agency, which is the U.N. nuclear watchdog agency. When Ahmadinejad was ushered to the podium of the General Assembly to speak, the U.S. delegation walked out, leaving only a low-ranking note-taker to listen to his speech, which indirectly accused the United States and Israel of major human rights violations. The Iranian president spoke hours after French President Nicolas Sarkozy warned the assembly that allowing Iran to arm itself with nuclear weapons would be an “unacceptable risk to stability in the region and in the world.” Earlier, German Chancellor Angela Merkel threatened tougher sanctions against Iran if the country remained intractable on the dispute over its nuclear program. Iran insists the program is purely peaceful, aimed solely at using nuclear reactors to generate electricity. But the United States and key European nations believe the program is a cover for an Iranian attempt to produce nuclear weapons. Ahmadinejad has defied two Security Council resolutions demanding Iran suspend enrichment and imposing escalating sanctions on key figures and organizations involved in the nuclear program. He made clear in his speech that Iran did not intend to comply with them now. “In the last two years, abusing the Security Council, the arrogant powers have repeatedly accused Iran and even made military threats and imposed illegal sanctions against it,” he said. “Fortunately, the IAEA has recently tried to regain its legal role as support of the rights of its members while supervising nuclear activities,” he added. “We see this as a correct approach adopted by the agency.” As a result, Ahmadinejad said, “I officially announce that in our opinion the nuclear issue of Iran is now closed and has turned into an ordinary agency matter.” Earlier this month, IAEA chief Mohamed El-Baradei said Iran’s cooperation with the agency represented an important step, but he urged Tehran to answer all questions – including reported experiments that link enrichment and missile technology – before the end of the year. This week, IAEA technical officials returned to Tehran to deal with the nuclear questions. But while Iran is allowing the IAEA to inspect its known nuclear facilities, it no longer allows inspectors freedom to look elsewhere for suspicious activities on short notice as it once did. El-Baradei recently proposed a compromise under which Iran would agree to answer questions on past nuclear activities, some of them with possible weapons applications, that it had refused to answer in the past. Tehran pledged to respond by the end of the year. The U.S. initially opposed the plan, fearing it could draw attention away from Iran’s defiance of the Security Council demand for a halt to Iranian uranium enrichment. It later endorsed the plan. Speaking to reporters after his speech, Ahmadinejad sought to clarify Tehran’s stance on the nuclear standoff, which he blamed on “certain big powers” that have sought “to turn a simple legal issue into a very loud, controversial political issue.” He said Tehran’s stance is that the matter involves only legal issues for the IAEA to handle, alluding to the Iranian regime’s insistence that it is following its commitments under the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty to use nuclear power only for peaceful purposes. In his speech to the assembly, Sarkozy called for the international community to be firm in pressuring Iran. “There will not be peace in the world if the international community falters in the face of the proliferation of nuclear arms,” Sarkozy said. The Iranian crisis “will only be resolved if firmness and dialogue go hand-in-hand.” Sarkozy’s comments came after Germany’s leader threatened tougher sanctions against Iran if the country remains intractable. Merkel said an Iranian nuclear bomb would have devastating consequences not only for Israel and the whole of the Middle East, but for Europe and the rest of the world. “For this reason, the international community must not let itself become splintered” in dealing with Iran, Merkel told reporters in New York. “The world should not have to prove to Iran that it is building a bomb, but Iran must convince the world that it doesn’t want to build a nuclear bomb.” Iran was not without allies. Nicaragua’s leftist President Daniel Ortega angrily chastised the U.S. for seeking to stop other countries from enriching uranium, which is allowed under the Nonproliferation Treaty. Ortega said the United States, as “the only country in the world to have dropped nuclear bombs on innocent people,” had no right to question the right of Iran and North Korea to pursue nuclear technology for “peaceful purposes.” “And even if they want nuclear power for purposes that are not peaceful, with what right does (the U.S.) question it?” he told the world leaders. Ortega has promised to maintain ties with Washington since taking office again in January but also has signed a series of accords with Iran. Earlier in the assembly’s opening session, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon pledged to push for lasting peace in the Middle East and an end to the conflict in Sudan’s Darfur region in the coming year, calling it one of the most challenging in the U.N.’s history. President Bush spoke next and announced new sanctions against Myanmar’s military dictatorship, accusing it of imposing “a 19-year reign of fear” that denies basic freedoms of speech, assembly and worship. But Bush barely mentioned Iran, a nation he also accuses of helping insurgents who are killing U.S. troops in Iraq. He also challenged the U.N. to continue to act as an arbiter in international affairs. “This great institution must work for great purposes to free people from tyranny and violence, hunger and disease, illiteracy and ignorance, and poverty and despair,” Bush said. “Every member of the United Nations must join in this mission of liberation.” Amadinejad, whose speech at Columbia University on Monday provoked protests, was in the General Assembly chamber for Bush’s speech. A U.N. diplomat in the chamber said the Iranian president listened to the secretary-general but pulled out his earpiece before Bush started to speak. Asked about the protests and tough questions he faced at Columbia, Ahmadinejad told a press conference late Tuesday that he didn’t find it to be difficult. “I speak of my opinions and say what I need to say, and others speak of theirs. “After all, we are patient enough to listen to what even groups that are hostile to us say.”160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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first_img1 If you left Leeds for Norwich, you’re not coming in! – Hometown’s Cian Morrin takes our Starting XI Q&A Each week, a leading band or artist takes our special Starting XI Q&A. Up this week, Cian Morrin from Hometown…Who would be the most rock ‘n’ roll signing your club could make?Rock ‘n’ roll for Leeds? Realistically? Bring back Jermaine Beckford I say.If your club was a song or a lyric, what would it be?Falling Slowly.Which football stadium would you most like to play a gig at (that’s not your club’s home ground)?Craven Cottage, I like the look of the stadium. Which footballer has the most potential to be a rock star?Potential? Let’s go for Raheem Sterling.Brit award or Premier League trophy?Brit award.When you were a kid, which football and music posters did you have on your wall?Alan Smith, and Green Day.Elvis was the king of rock ‘n’ roll, Michael Jackson the king of pop… Who’s the king of football?Diego Maradona is the king.If you were in charge of your club’s dressing room stereo, what tunes would you put on before a big game and why?Fall Out Boy – Suger We’re Down; 30 Seconds to Mars – Kings and Queen.Which signing got you most excited and which player’s departure broke your heart?Most excited, probably El Hadji Diouf! Haha! Rio Ferdinand leaving was a bit of heartbreak. Which footballer would you refuse complimentary tickets to one of your gigs?Any player that left Leeds for Norwich. I’ll need plenty of security.What’s the best football song ever recorded?Marching on TogetherCheck out Hometown’s debut single ‘Where I Belong’ on YouTube right herelast_img read more

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first_imgA major feature film has started filming across Donegal in a number of locations including Killea, Letterkenny and Moville.A scene from Bravado.Bravado is the new feature film from Derry born, writer and director David Harkin.The film is financed solely by the producers David Harkin, Eoin Daly & Golda Mansilla and has received no third party funding whatsoever. Bravado is a crime story that tells the story of Rebecca Kelly (Shauna Lawson) who is looking to get in touch with her estranged husband Martin Doherty (Sean Green).Martin has neglected his parental responsibilities and has vanished.Rebecca seeking answers; enlists the help of private investigator Christopher Swann (James McLaughlin). Swann uncovers a lot more about Martin than he ever intended and gets himself mixed up in the middle of a gang war with no easy way out.The cast also includes Hugh Barbour, Johnny French, Geoff Coke, Ciaran Keogh, Brendan Gallagher and Nina Vallee. David Harkin is best known for his short film Politics, which won the Greer Garson Film Award at the University of Ulster and for his zero-budget feature Murderous, which won Best Local Film at last year’s Yellow Fever Independent Film Festival in Belfast.  MAJOR FEATURE FILM STARTS SHOOTING IN DONEGAL was last modified: August 20th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:BravadoDavid Harkinfilmlast_img read more

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