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first_imgView comments For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Read Next Ex-UFC champ Ronda Rousey poised to join the WWE at ‘Wrestlemania 34’ —report The victory allowed the Fighting Maroons to leapfrog over National University to get to the fourth spot, tying the Tamaraws with a 5-6 record.UP head coach Bo Perasol is just on his second year with the Fighting Maroons but he is aware of his team’s 12-game losing streak against FEU.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“First off, Paolo Romero really asked us to win this game because in his seven years in UP he hasn’t won a game against FEU, so we did it for Pao,” said Perasol in Filipino.“Paul also made sure that he’ll get back on [Ron] Dennison on the defensive end limiting him to just nine points.” CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES FEU held a 49-39 lead midway through the fourth quarter after outscoring UP 22-5 in the third period, but the Fighting Maroons came roaring back with Jun Manzo capping a 17-4 run to give UP a 56-53 lead with 38 seconds left in the game.Jasper Parker momentarily silenced the UP crowd with a triple that tied the game, 56-56, with 32.9 seconds remaining.Desiderio finished with a game-high 15 points, on a disastrous 6-of-23 shooting clip, while Ibrahim Outtara held UP’s interior with 10 points, 15 rebounds, and two blocks.Parker filled the stat sheets for FEU with 13 points, eight rebounds, and five assists.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games PLAY LIST 00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netThe Final Four picture got a little tighter as University of the Philippines forced a tie at the fourth spot after surviving Far Eastern University, 59-56, in the UAAP Season 80 men’s basketball tournament Saturday at Mall of Asia Arena.Paul Desiderio emerged as the hero again for the Fighting Maroons, knocking down the game-clinching step-back triple over Ron Dennison with a little over a second left on the clock.ADVERTISEMENT Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMClast_img read more

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first_img AFC U-19 Championship QualifiersfootballIndiaindian football First Published: November 9, 2019, 3:07 PM IST Al Khobar (Saudi Arabia): India bowed out of the race for the 2020 AFC U-19 Championships qualification after a 0-4 defeat to Saudi Arabia here.The home side opened the scoring in the second minute as forward Mohammad Khalil Marran latched on to a loose ball and put it past Indian custodian Prabhsukhan Singh Gill. Saudi Arabia made it 2-0 in the 10th minute as midfielder Ahmad Albassas got on the end of a cross from the left flank by Hazzaa Alghamdi.As India head coach Floyd Pinto’s side pushed forward to reduce the deficit, Albassas scored his second of the game in the 18th minute at the Prince Saud bin Jalawi Stadium on Friday.He completed his hat-trick in the 28th minute, once again converting a low cross from the left flank as Saudi Arabia broke forward in numbers on the break.Ninthoinganba Meetei posed problems for the hosts throughout the first half down the wing with his pace and guile, earning multiple free-kicks from attacking positions. He came closest to scoring two minutes before the half-time break but his powerful shot went just wide of the post.India made a personnel change at the break with Manvir Singh coming on for Ricky Shabong. Manvir almost made an instant impact as he raced towards the by-line down the right and put in a cross that just evaded Vikram Partap on the far post in the 47th minute.In their final group stage match, which has been rendered inconsequential, India will face Afghanistan at the same venue on Sunday. Get the best of News18 delivered to your inbox – subscribe to News18 Daybreak. Follow News18.com on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Telegram, TikTok and on YouTube, and stay in the know with what’s happening in the world around you – in real time.last_img read more

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first_imgzoom The smooth running of the well-established global regime for compensation from oil pollution from ships may be under serious threat, due to a decision by governments to wind up the 1971 International Oil Pollution Compensation Fund (IOPCF), says the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS), the global trade association for shipowners.At next week’s IOPCF meeting in London, ICS (in conjunction with BIMCO and Intertanko) will argue that it is premature to wind up the 1971 Fund when there are still outstanding claims not covered by the current 1992 Fund.Some of these claims are subject to litigation, with money potentially still owed to the shipowners’ insurers, the Protection & Indemity (P&I) Clubs. ICS is therefore supporting the position of the International Group of P&I Clubs on this issue and advocating a rethink of the decision, confirmed by an IOPCF meeting in April this year.The shipping industry believes that the decision to wind up the 1971 Fund before resolving outstanding claims is in breach of the 1971 International Convention on the Establishment of an International Fund for Compensation for Oil Pollution, and will also result in a serious threat to the operation of the 1992 Fund, to the detriment of future pollution victims’ interests.The issue is complicated but, because of the failure to address outstanding claims, the P&I Clubs may no longer be willing to continue their current practice of making advance interim payments, following pollution incidents, in excess of the shipowners’ limitation amounts (under the IMO Civil Liability Convention) if it is thought that these excess payments may not be compensated by the 1992 Fund in the future. This could cause delay in providing compensation, potentially resulting in significant hardship for claimants when they could already be in difficult circumstances, says the ICS.ICS believes that those governments that have supported the decision to wind up the 1971 Fund may not have not given full regard to these long term dangers.“It is important to understand that these unintended consquences are real” said ICS Secretary General, Peter Hinchliffe. “The P&I Clubs, which are owned by shipowners, have made it very clear that this decision is likely to have very serious implications. We are therefore pleased that the United Kingdom has recognised our concerns, suggesting that the decision to wind up the 1971 Fund should be deferred at next week’s critical meeting of the IOPCF. We hope very much that other IMO Member States will support the UK’s submission.”For four decades the regime established by the IMO Civil Liability (CLC) and Fund Conventions, with costs divided between shipowners and cargo interests, has provided a quick and efficient means of compensating pollution victims. The shipowners’ contribution is paid regardless of fault, with claimants having recourse to the IOPCF (which is funded by contributions from the oil industry) if the shipowner’s liability under the CLC Convention is exceeded.“We wish to avoid jeopardising the future operation of the IMO regime” said Peter Hinchliffe. “The decision to wind up the 1971 Fund before claims have been settled also appears to contravene the IMO Fund Convention. We therefore hope that governments will do the right thing and reverse this unfortunate decision.” Press Release; October 14, 2014; Image: NOAAlast_img read more

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first_imgzoom Oslo-based owner and operator of chemical tankers Eitzen Chemical ASA said it has secured support from all of its lenders anf bondholders for its restructuring plan.Completion of the restructuring as set out in the Plan Support Agreement (PSA) is expected to take place by the end of January, and in any event no later than 28 February 2015, the company said.Under the USD 850 million plan, which purports granting of loans and sale-and-leasebacks, the company’s bondholders are to take over  98% of the company’s debt.The company has entered into a term sheet regarding a new revolving credit and term loan facility worth USD 100 million, with an option to increase the aggregate principal amount to USD 150 million by inviting additional lenders to participate in the financing.Eitzen also reduced the company’s  share capital by reducing the nominal value of the shares and by liquidation of shares owned by the company.The company intends to change its name to Team Tankers International and is also looking to re-incorporate in Bermuda as part of the restructuring process.last_img read more

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first_imgzoom Florida International Terminal (FIT), operated by provider of port, towage and logistics services SAAM, has commenced a modernization project in an effort to improve its services.The project entails building a modern terminal with new facilities such as a gatehouse with eight lines, doubling its capacity to receive and ship containers, as well as an office building, a new connection bank for refrigerated cargo and agricultural inspection platforms for the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).“These investments are part of our long-term development plan to continue positioning FIT as one of South Florida’s main cargo terminals, with the best customer service in the region,” Klaus Stadthagen, FIT’s CEO, said.All of these infrastructure investments are accompanied by a plan to increase security for associates and cargo and other continual improvements in terminal operations.Cargo movements through Florida International Terminal, which services shipping lines including Hamburg Süd, Hapag Lloyd, Sealand, Yang Ming, NYK, ZIM, CMA-CGM/APL, reached over 202,000 TEUs in 2016.last_img read more

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first_imgThe province has introduced the Police and Peace Officers Memorial Day Act. This act designates the third Sunday of each October as a special day for Nova Scotians to commemorate peace officers who have lost their lives in the line of duty. “Those who have given their lives protecting others have made the ultimate sacrifice and we are all grateful for their selfless actions,” said Murray Scott, Minister of Justice. “While they deserve our recognition every day, an annual designated day will ensure we take the time to properly acknowledge their service and commitment to their fellow Nova Scotians.” Peace officers in Nova Scotia include municipal police, RCMP, sheriffs, and correctional officers. There have been 15 deaths in the line of duty in Nova Scotia. The Nova Scotia Chiefs of Police Association recently passed a motion supporting the designation of an annual day to mark fallen peace officers. “As a former police officer I know the dangers faced every day by law enforcement in our province,” said Mr. Scott. “This memorial day will serve as an on-going reminder of the officers we have lost and those who are currently hard at work protecting our communities.”last_img read more

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first_imgCara McKenna APTN National NewsThe leadership of two northern B.C. First Nations are enacting their own laws to protect their territories in a move that could have a far-reaching impacts on Indigenous rights and resource development across Canada. Chiefs and councillors from the Nadleh Whut’en and Stellat’en First Nations proclaimed the province’s first Aboriginal water management regime in Vancouver last week. They are believed to be the first communities in B.C. to ever put their time-old tribal laws to paper.Nadleh Whut’en elected Chief Martin Louie, speaking on behalf of hereditary leaders, said the decision was triggered by the nations’ fight with Enbridge to protect its land from the company’s proposed Northern Gateway pipeline.But the legislation applies to numerous other projects including mining and the massive Site C hydroelectric dam.“If anyone wants to do business in the Nadleh Whu’ten land and territory, you’ll abide by our laws,” he said.“For the last thousand years, we haven’t changed in any way, the only change that you see today is that our laws are on paper.”The written legislation outlines the consultation, assessment and management that the leaders believe will be necessary to protect the water in salmon in their territories’ numerous freshwater lakes, rivers and streams.Both communities are already feeling the impacts left behind by big industry and their leaders say that now any future projects must follow their rules.Stellat’en Coun. Tannis Reynolds (Dzih Bhen) said her community is trying to find energy alternatives because there is already so much damage in their territory from the Endako Mine and Rio Tinto Alcan’s Kenney hydroelectric dam.“Even our tap water isn’t good, it’s contaminated with arsenic, people have skin deficiencies, they’re losing their hair,” she said.“We need clean water in our communities. It’s so important on so many levels, and we’re all hoping and praying that this will make a difference.”Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs Grand Chief Stewart Phillip said the policy is a reflection of a multitude of Supreme Court decisions for Indigenous rights that culminated with the landmark Tsilhqot’in Nation land claim victory in 2014.The high court decision to give Tsilhqot’in rights to more than 1,700 square km of land was hailed as a game-changer for bands across Canada, and the residual impacts of the case are now beginning to be seen.“The Tsilhqot’in decision was half of the story,” he said.“This is the other half of the story, where the principles of the Tsilhqot’in decision are incorporated into tribal indigenous nations standing up their own traditional laws. “The one word to describe this document is consent, and it’s going to have an enormous impact on major resource development.”last_img read more

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5 March 2007The top United Nations humanitarian official, whose tenure began on 1 March, said today that he is eager to see first-hand the dire humanitarian situation in western Sudan, as well as visit Chad and the Central African Republic (CAR), which are both hosting refugees who have fled the war-torn Darfur region. “I want to get onto the ground soon to see for myself what is happening in some of the critical areas,” John Holmes, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, told reporters in his first press briefing since taking office.In the region, the problems regarding the safety of the displaced as well as of humanitarian workers “are increasing and unacceptable and the problems of access, if anything, are worsening,” he added.To this end, Mr. Holmes, who now heads the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), is currently in discussions with the authorities of the three countries regarding a trip scheduled for 20-31 March, during which he hopes to meet with Government officials, humanitarian workers and those living in camps.In his new position, Mr. Holmes will wear “three separate hats,” each with “various goals.” In his capacity as the Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs, he said that he believes he will play a significant advocacy role to emphasize such issues as the significance of access in humanitarian relief, highlighting neglected crises and the sexual violence in conflict.As the Emergency Relief Coordinator, he hopes to build upon reforms and innovations initiated in recent years, such as the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF), which helps countries cope with underfunded emergencies.Finally, of the International Strategy for Disaster Risk Reduction which he will lead, Mr. Holmes noted that he wants to increase the public’s awareness that “money spent on prevention is a better investment than money spent on response after [a disaster].”The new Under-Secretary-General, who replaces Norway’s Jan Egeland, also described what he believes will be his dual approach to his position. “What I will try to do is combine a certain amount of quiet diplomacy if necessary… but also I will have absolutely no hesitation of speaking up in a striking and passionate way.”Aside from Sudan, Chad and the CAR, other countries high on his agency’s agenda are Somalia, where OCHA hopes to increase its activities in the south and centre of the country, Uganda, where the government is currently in talks with the rebel group, the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), and Mozambique, which has been ravaged by both floods and a tropical cyclone.Mr. Holmes also mentioned Iraq as a country whose humanitarian situation OCHA is closely monitoring. Approximately 1.8 million Iraqis have been internally displaced, while the same number of Iraqi refugees now reside outside the country’s borders. OCHA is opening an office in Amman, Jordan, to help coordinate humanitarian efforts to assist the refugees.Mr. Holmes, a veteran diplomat from the United Kingdom, most recently served as his country’s ambassador to France prior to assuming his current position at the UN. In his career with the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office, he has covered and been posted in many regions, including the Middle East, Africa, Asia and Latin America. In 1999, he was awarded a knighthood, largely for the role he played in the Northern Ireland peace process and the 1998 Good Friday Agreement. read more

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The Commander has also instructed to convene a Court of Inquiry (CoI) to inquire into the incident at the earliest and advised the Sri Lanka Corps of Military Police and the Director Legal in the Army to extend their maximum cooperation to the ongoing police investigations. The Commander of the Army Lieutenant General Crishanthe De Silva has suspended the service of Lieutenant Colonel Pradeep Kumar with immediate effect, due to his alleged involvement in a shooting incident at Malabe.Lieutenant Colonel Pradeep Kumar is accused of being involved in the incident where his wife was shot and injured by a gang. Accordingly, Army personnel, arrested in connection with any such serious crimes would face strict disciplinary actions once they were found guilty, subsequent to internal investigations, the army media unit said. (Colombo Gazette) read more

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OTTAWA – Even the most hardened politicians succumbed to the pain of global tragedy this week.Hit first by the shooting in Orlando on Sunday, then by the beheading of another Canadian hostage in the Philippines on Monday, and by the slaying of a British MP on Thursday, Parliament Hill reeled with shock and outrage.The business of Parliament kept a frantic pace, however, driven by the government’s wish to pass the assisted dying bill as soon as possible. The bill spent the week caught between the will of the House and the new-found determination of the Senate.Less noticeable were several moves to rejig policy in a way that could affect everyday lives in Canada.Here are three ways politics mattered this week:PENSION PROBLEMS: Federal and provincial finance officials have been burning the candle at both ends this week in the hopes of finding a compromise that would see the federal Liberals keep an election promise to expand the Canada Pension Plan.The federal goal, as vaguely outlined in speeches and documents, is to substantially increase the retirement payout to the next generation of middle-class retirees. Fewer people will be covered by private plans, and those who are covered will often have less generous benefits than today’s retirees.But there’s an open question about whether governments need to step into the breach. The price of an expanded CPP is higher premiums for employers and employees today. Some provinces have yet to be convinced that the higher price is worth paying right now, especially since there will be a political backlash from small business as well as conservatives who would rather see individuals take control of their own personal finances.Maybe after the federal and provincial finance ministers hash it out Monday in Vancouver, the public will see some hard numbers and be better able to engage in an informed debate about whether our retirement savings our adequate — and if not, whether an expanded CPP is the best solution.GIRL POWER: MPs of all stripes voted 225-74 to slightly change the words to the national anthem this week so that it would be gender neutral. But that wasn’t the biggest move MPs made to reflect the role of women in public life.The Status of Women committee had all-party support for its recommendation to subject every single government initiative to a gender-based analysis before it gets the green light. The committee wants legislation that would make the analysis mandatory. Minister Patty Hajdu seems open to the idea.The implications for regular people could be big or small, depending on how seriously the government takes the idea.With the government’s plan to spend $60-billion on infrastructure, for example, how would a gender analysis affect a program that would normally create jobs that overwhelmingly go to men? Committee member and Liberal MP Sean Fraser says a gender analysis would encourage the government to improve training for women in the skilled trades.But what would happen if instead of shaping women to fit the program, the government shaped the program to fit women?CANADIANS ON THE TELLY: The government, via the CRTC, has put in place its first policy building block to rescue local news.The broadcast regulator will require private English-language TV stations to air at least seven hours of local news every week — double that for big-city stations in Toronto and Vancouver. French-language stations will need to carry five hours of local news.Where will the money come from? Mainly from shuffling around parts of existing pots of money already put into community programming by the networks. Big companies such as Bell, Rogers and Quebecor can take some of the $156 million currently spent on community programming for local news production instead — on condition they keep all their stations open. Independent stations will see what is new money to them, but comes from the existing community fund.The CRTC order is only the first piece of the puzzle the government is working on. It sees a crisis in local news, not just in television but in print and digital media as well, and is actively looking for solutions on all fronts. by Heather Scoffield, Ottawa Bureau Chief, The Canadian Press Posted Jun 17, 2016 3:00 pm MDT Last Updated Jun 18, 2016 at 6:00 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Pensions, girl power, TV: three ways federal politics touched us this week read more

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Tom Scholes-Fogg was just 10 years old when his grandfather, a police sergeant, showed him the oak sapling planted in memory of one of his officers. Alison Armitage, a police constable with Greater Manchester Police, had been killed in the line of duty only months before. She was just 29.Sergeant John Scholes beckoned his wide-eyed grandchild to examine the tree, planted besides Oldham police station. “We paused and reflected on the terrible circumstances which led to Alison’s passing,” recalled Mr Scholes-Fogg.His grandfather then turned to him and told him: “We don’t look after the emergency services in this country the way we should.”Eighteen years on, Mr Scholes-Fogg vividly recalls the event. “Those words have stayed with me. I have always thought about it,” he said. “Alison Armitage was only 29, a year older than me. The officers at the station had paid for the tree in her honour. It was a tiny sapling when my grandfather took me to see it. It’s grown a lot since then.”On March 5, 2001, PC Armitage  was on plain clothes duty on an operation with a colleague to keep watch on a parked, stolen car. When a youth – who would later be identified as 19-year-old Thomas Whaley – climbed into the car and started the engine, PC Armitage and her colleague ran to the vehicle. PC Armitage approached from the rear while the other officer went to the driver’s door to try and make the arrest and prevent Whaley speeding off. Instead Whaley put the Vauxhall Vectra into reverse and ‘violently’ ran over PC Armitage at speed. Whaley then drove forward running over the stricken officer a second time, dragging her under the vehicle and causing fatal multiple injuries.  Only last month, he was injured on duty, his police car rammed by a sports car, driven by drug dealers in east London. “There are risks associated with all the services,” said Mr Scholes-Fogg. “Police officers are assaulted on duty. I have been kicked, punched and spat at. The same is true of the other emergency services.“I envisage this statue has to be a national symbol of gratitude and recognition of the sacrifice made by the emergency services. This should have been done a long, long time ago.”In two years, the National Emergency services memorial has secured support from six prime ministers, including the incumbent Boris Johnson, and then this week backing from the Duke of Cambridge.The statue has a long way to go to raise £3 million needed to get it constructed. But a simple conversation between a grandfather and a grandson almost two decades ago has made it – at least – a possibility. Now it needs the public’s support to make it happen. Sculptor Philip Jackson with a maquette of a planned memorial for all emergency services workers Whaley was sentenced to eight years for manslaughter but walked free on licence in 2006, “shouting foul-mouthed abuse at staff” as he left prison, according to reports. At a memorial service in 2001, Alison’s mother Lillian said: “Alison’s death has brought home to me how vulnerable police officers are and I would ask that the public support the police in doing their job wherever they can.”Locals in Oldham began a fund that raised £8,000 for memorials at the scene of her death and at two police stations. Tony Blair, at her memorial service, said: “I wish I had known her, but it is important that we all know what she did. In her short life she achieved so much.” Tom Scholes-Fogg and sculptor Philip JacksonCredit:Geoff Pugh/The Telegraph Sculptor Philip Jackson with a maquette of a planned memorial for all emergency services workersCredit:Geoff Pugh/The Telegraph PC Armitage died after being run over by a teen driving a stolen car Tom Scholes-Fogg and sculptor Philip Jackson Finally the clay models will be cast in bronze and – if timings and fundraising goes to plan – unveiled to the public by the summer of 2021, just two years away.Mr Jackson said it was time and fitting for the emergency services to have their own memorial. “We all hope we will never have to call 999 but we sleep more soundly in our beds at night knowing all it takes is a phone call to get a highly professional group of people to sort out whatever the particular crisis might be,” said Mr Jackson.Has a member of the emergency services changed your life? Send your experiences of getting help after calling 999 to yourstory@telegraph.co.uk  to be featured.  PC Armitage died after being run over by a teen driving a stolen car Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. In August 2016, Mr Scholes-Fogg, who had been working in his paid day job for his local authority in London, had a brainwave. What was needed was an Emergency Services Day – a 999 Day – to promote the work of the emergency services. He set aside 9th September and secured the backing of the then prime minister Theresa May who declared: “As a nation, we are indebted to them for their courage and their sacrifice and it is absolutely right that we should honour their incredible service in this very special way.”The inaugural 999 Day launched last year. Today, a second memorial service – a 999 Festival of Thanksgiving – was held in St Giles’ Cathedral in Edinburgh, attended by ministers from both the UK and Scottish governments.But now the hard work begins for a monument. “The Australian statue inspired me to do something for the 7,000 personnel who have been killed on duty, like Alison Armitage,” said Mr Scholes-Fogg, “I wanted to do something for all of them and also for the two million people working in emergency services in the NHS, the police, and the other services.”The monument will not just be a place to pay respects for the dead, but to show respect for the job done day to day. Mr Scholes-Fogg is not alone wondering whether paramedics, police officers and the like always get the acclaim they deserve. Nor are they always treated well on the job. That, said Mr Scholes-Fogg, needs to change and he hopes the statue will help with that. In 2016, it dawned on Tom Scholes-Fogg, who had been working as volunteer police sergeant, that there was no single monument for emergency service workers anywhere in the country. Unlike the cenotaph which provides a national focal point for the Armed Forces, emergency services personnel had nothing. There was nowhere for the public to go to pay respects and show their appreciation for staff across the ambulance, fire, police, coastguard and lowland and mountain rescue.Australia, he quickly discovered, had such a memorial in the capital Canberra that was opened in 2004. Britain, he decided, needed something similar. Mr Jackson was eager to create an emergency services monument. “Tom was very articulate about what it was all about and I immediately understood what it was trying to achieve.”Mr Jackson first created a small model, a five-sided statue with each figure eight-feet high representing five emergency services – fire, police, ambulance, lifeboat and coastguard, and lowland and mountain rescue. The Telegraph was given exclusive access to it along with a 14 inch high maquette created over the summer. It depicts a firefighter in full modern uniform with equipment. All five statues will show the emergency service workers in their most modern kit. Branches of the emergency services have sent the sculptor their most up-to-date uniforms and a model will pose with them. Attention to detail is key for Mr Jackson. When all five maquettes are completed  he will begin sculpting the figures in clay at full size. The paramedic will be depicted by a woman; the rest of the figures will be male. There will also be a dog to accompany the lowland rescue team although the sculptor is still researching what breed of dog that should be. For the moment, his first model depicts one of his own two cocker spaniels. Tom Scholes-Fogg wrote to Mr Jackson last year asking him to get on board. He had seen his Bomber Command memorial and other statues created by the sculptor. No sculptor – alive or dead – has more statues in London than Mr Jackson. His other works include The Queen’s Golden Jubilee Equestrian Sculpture in Windsor Great Park; The Korean War Monument outside the Ministry of Defence; a statue of Bobby Moore at Wembley Stadium; Mahatma Gandhi in parliament Square; and the National memorial Sculpture to Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother in The Mall. Sculptor says monument will have immediate impactPhilip Jackson, possibly Britain’s most acclaimed living sculptor, has agreed to design and create the planned National Emergency Services Monument. Mr Jackson created the Bomber Command Memorial in Green Park in central London that was unveiled officially by the Queen in 2012 after a huge fundraising drive that included more than £1million from readers of the daily Telegraph. Mr Jackson believes his planned ‘999 statue’ will immediately – like the Bomber Command monument – change attitudes to the emergency services.“It seems to me that up until now, the emergency services have been tacked on to the end of the Armed Services. I think it is now right they should have a memorial of their own,” said Mr Jackson. “I think monuments can change the way people think about these things. “Prior to the creation of the Bomber Command memorial people associated it only with Dresden and there was a very, very negative response that you got. We thought it would take  a long time after the memorial was unveiled before people would change their opinions. But it happened overnight.” read more

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Police in Linden, Region 10 (Upper Demerara-Berbice) are on the hunt for a male suspect in relation to the alleged rape of a 12-year-old girl, which took place on the evening of Saturday, August 12.Reports are that the 12 year-old, who reportedly attended an event with three of her friends, caught a taxi referred to as a ‘$100 dollar car’ or ‘short drop car’ at Co-op Crescent, Mackenzie, around 22:00hrs in an effort to get to her home at Amelia’s Ward, Linden.However, upon reaching the area, the taxi driver reportedly passed the stops where the child and her friends were expected to get out. The three friends who were seated in the back seat reportedly forced their way out of the car, leaving the victim who was seated in the front seat and who was wearing her seat belt at the time, inside.The victim was reportedly taken to a ‘back road’ area at Lower Kara Kara by the taxi driver where she was forced out of the vehicle and sexually assaulted. The suspect reportedly then dropped the victim off at the Kara Kara Bridge where she was left to walk home.Family members of the victim, who were said to be looking for her after her friends alerted them as to what transpired, then took her to the Police station, thence to the Linden Hospital for medical examination. The results of the medical examination proved that the victim was sexually assaulted. Police reportedly took statements in relation to the matter.However, the suspect has been eluding the lawmen. Officers are said to have visited the home of the suspect and an area where he frequents but he remains in hiding. (Utamu Belle) Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedSuspect in rape of 12-year-old turns self inAugust 25, 2017In “Crime”Linden taxi driver remanded to prison for alleged rape of girl, 12September 5, 2017In “Court”Taxi driver accused of raping teen granted bailSeptember 14, 2018In “Court” read more

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first_imgTERRY O’SULLIVAN HAS one word for the political stasis in the United States right now: “Bullshit”.It’s no surprise that O’Sullivan, as the general president of the Labourers’ International Union of North America (LIUNA), takes a dim view of the right’s and particularly the Tea Party’s influence on US politics.But you might be surprised to find that he believes the Tea Party is actually helping his and the left’s cause while damaging their own.“I think they’re doing more harm to the Republican Party and bettering the chances of [Democratic House Leader] Nancy Pelosi being Speaker of the House once again, which from our perspective is a great thing, not a good thing,” he said.Together with five other US trade unions leaders, including Dan Kane from the Teamsters and Ed Smith from Ullico, O’Sullivan was in Dublin this week to meet with similar-minded folk in Irish unions and a Sinn Féin-organised rally in the Mansion House.In an interview with TheJournal.ie, O’Sullivan, Kane and Smith had a familiar message to anyone who leans to the left on the political spectrum: Austerity isn’t working.‘More than dollars and cents’“There’s places you have to look to cut, but it seems to us it isn’t done at the expense of banks,” O’Sullivan (above) said. “We’ve seen that in Ireland and the US, it’s at the expense of retirees, the people who were outside today.” (Referring to Tuesday’s protests outside the Dáil)“It’s done at the expense of working men and women, of young people with aspirations and hopes who are jumping on airplanes to fulfil those aspirations somewhere else.”The problem is that it could be reasonably argued that austerity has and is working in Ireland with the economy growing (slightly), the Live Register falling and the bailout exit in sight.But O’Sullivan does not agree: “We understand balancing budgets but there’s a right way to do it and a wrong way to do it. We believe  that far too many times countries have chosen the wrong path [where] it has comes off the back of working men and women.”“This is more than dollars and cents,” he adds, referring to the human impact of austerity.An estimated 13 million people in the US are trade union members including around 11 million in the largest federation, the AFL-CIO. In a country of 315 million people that’s not a lot and all three men argue it’s  the private sector’s fault.They say trade union membership is 12 per cent of the workforce in the public sector, but just 7 per cent in the private sector. Smith argues that the private sector has been “under attack” for many years in the United States.“It’s got the private sector at about 7 per cent of the workforce… so they’ve done a real job… anti-union, pro-right wing anti-union forces,” he said.Pensions Smith (above) believes these problems can be traced back to the state of Wisconsin two years ago, where the legislature attempted to pass laws restricting collective bargaining and other union rights.This was widely seen as the first battle between the Tea Party and organised labour.These laws were passed in attempt to plug huge budget deficits. The arguments put forward are simple: that public sector pensions were and are unaffordable in many US states. There are gaping holes in states’ pension plans between what they spend and what they take in.But that’s not the public sector employees’ fault, say the labour leaders.“No, no, that’s the bullshit that they pedal,” O’Sullivan said, identifying the problem as being states not paying into pension funds when they should have been.Ed Smith explained: “My home state is Illinois. Of the 50 states it is 50th out of 50 in underfunding, the worst of the worst.“The workers’ money came out of their pay cheque to go in the pension and the state was to match this. But in the US each state must have a balanced budget every year, so to balance the budget the state would make no pension payments.“This was even though the workers’ share went in every two weeks. The state didn’t [pay its share], so now they have this huge underfunding because of the economic crisis in ’08. So they said that the workers are the problem.”Political deadlockAdvancing these arguments are restricted, the trio argue, by the barriers placed by employers and government on employees joining unions in the US. Kane (above) argues that laws that are – “oppressive and regressive”.He said: “Even though the polls out there show that over 50 per cent of workers, given an opportunity, would join a union. Nobody argues that that’s the sentiment. But it’s a different situation with organising.”The three men and indeed the labour movement on whole in the US is not averse to working with Republicans – “the old Republican Party we dealt with”  – but their view is that the Tea Party has to be taken out of the equation.Smith said: “No congress will pass any funding to rebuild… the key to America has been our infrastructure, from our railraods to our highways, and that’s deteriorating.“That’s because of the impasse in our congress and the Tea Party… You got to go back to before the American Civil War to see where we’ve had this kind of loggerheads.”Pics: YouTube, Wikimedia Commons, UllicoDamien Kiberd: Austerity economics have us locked in PermaslumpRead: Families have seen monthly disposable income drop by €300 since 2008Ex-IMF mission chief: ‘Ireland needs a new jolt of growth’last_img read more

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first_img https://jrnl.ie/4506642 By Cónal Thomas Friday 22 Feb 2019, 6:10 AM Feb 21st 2019, 7:24 PM 23,186 Views Metrolink: How did we get here and what’s next? The NTA is due to publish a preferred route in March. 21.02.19 Closure of Luas Green Line to facilitate Metrolink ‘off the agenda’, Ross says “These proposals emerged following last year’s extensive public consultations, to specifically cater for the concerns of Ranelagh residents,” the spokesperson added. “Regrettably, this section of the development was heavily politicised by local representatives.”‘Ill-considered plan’In the latest controversy, local representatives have taken the opportunity to hammer home local concerns. Fianna Fáil TD Jim O’Callaghan welcomed the proposed scrapping of the southside route, describing it as “a matter that has deeply frustrated those living in the areas most impacted”. “The fact that this ill-considered plan could be taken off the table means that there may be a welcome opportunity to draw up a better, more environmentally friendly MetroLink plan for South Dublin and this time, in proper consultation with the public”.Meanwhile, Noel Rock TD has called for the route to proceed in two parts and to not allow Northsiders be “shafted” by a “southside squabble”.Green Party leader Eamon Ryan TD called on Ross not to abandon the southside section of the Metrolink but to “look at alternatives”. From Charlemont station, Ryan has said that the Metro should either continue South West to Terenure, Rathfarnham and Tallaght or South East to UCD and Sandyford.“Come what may there should be no delay in the northside section of the line,” Ryan has said. “While that is advanced through the planning process we can work out the optimal southside route.”For now, the NTA is not being drawn on recent reports, though it’s not denying them either. A revised route for the Metrolink is due to be published in the coming weeks, an NTA spokesperson confirmed. “Those amended plans will be subject to a further round of public consultation.” Share26 Tweet Email3 38 Comments Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Short URL Source: Metrolink.ieWITH THE SOUTHSIDE section of the Dublin Metrolink project set to abandoned by the National Transport Authority (NTA), plans for the city’s underground rail have been thrown open. The mostly underground route, which is due to connect Dublin Airport to the city centre by rail and beyond to Sandyford for the first time, will still run from Swords to the city centre but it’s now likely to stop north of Ranelagh at CharlemontThat’s because the NTA’s preferred route involved disrupting the Luas Green Line for up to four years, it was reported yesterday. The line was due to open in 2027 and was originally expected to run from Swords on Dublin’s northside to Sandyford on the southside with the construction of a new underground track from Swords to Charlemont while an upgraded section of the Luas Green Line would remain overground. The latest change – abandoning the southside section – is set to be announced next month by the NTA when a new route option will be published. Speaking in the Dáil yesterday evening, Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport, Shane Ross, refused to confirm whether the southside part of the project will be abandoned but said that he “wouldn’t tolerate” continued disruption to the Luas Green Line.  Following the latest development, politicians have called for alternatives to the much-vaunted project to be examined. So, here’s a recap of how we got here and what’s likely to happen next. ‘Berlin Wall’Plans for a Metro in Dublin have been floating around for some time; plans were halted in 2011 due to the economic downturn. In March last year, a new plan was published for the MetroLink, which would see a route run between Swords and Sandyford.That plan, however, received a significant amount of criticism, primarily from a group of southside residents in Ranelagh in Dublin 6.Last July, Peter Nash, a member of the Rethink MetroLink Dublin South City group, told an Oireachtas committee that the proposed MetroLink was akin to the opening of a “Checkpoint Charlie” on the Berlin Wall. The argument centred around the closure of a through-road from Dunville Avenue to Beechwood Road.Outlining the group’s concerns to the transport committee, Nash said transformation of the current Luas line to a segregated high-speed over-ground Metrolink southwards from Charlemont has “significant adverse social, environmental and commercial consequences for the adjacent neighbourhoods”. Nash said a segregated high-speed over-ground rail, in effect, creates a clear physical partition within communities. Cowper Luas Station on Dublin’s southside Source: GoogleMapsThere were also concerns on Dublin’s northside following the project’s relaunch. The current plans also saw proposals to establish a tunnel boring machine launch site  which will share its perimeter with Scoil Mobhí in Glasnevin. The school shares its site with Na Fianna GLG, Scoil Chaitríona, and playschool Tír na nOg.Representatives of the schools and clubs appeared before an Oireachtas committee last April to raise concerns about the planned site. However, speaking at an Oireachtas committee last June, the NTA’s deputy CEO Hugh Creegan said that an alternative design was being considered.Over the subsequent months, the NTA came under pressure from local politicians, including Minister for Housing Eoghan Murphy whose constituency is Ranelagh-Rathmines, to change the route. One solution to the Dunville Avenue/Beechwood Road issue involved either constructing a rail bridge over the road or a ‘cut and cover’ plan which would see the Metro travel underground which would add €25 to €35 million to the project’s €3 billion budget. It’s understood that plans to extend this option were drawn up, after proposals were rejected locally, which would cost an additional €100 million.  Source: RollingNews.ieHowever, that plan would cause the Luas Green Line to be disconnected and be disrupted for two to four years, it has been reported. A spokesperson for Minister for Transport Shane Ross TD has confirmed that Ross met with the NTA and Transport Infrastructure Ireland for “crisis talks” this week and warned that bringing the Luas Green Line to a standstill for a significant period would be “unacceptable”.  Related Readlast_img read more

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first_imgCyberattaque : la BBC accuserait l’Iran de perturbations La chaîne brittanique BBC aurait été victime d’une attaque informatique. Son service en persan (farsi), plus exactement.Selon l’AFP, Mark Thompson, directeur général de la BBC, accuse l’Iran de provoquer des perturbations du service persan de la BBC Persian, qui compte pas loin de 7,2 millions de spectateurs malgré la censure du régime en place. L’Iran aurait tenté de brouiller des diffusions satellitaires à destination du pays et des lignes téléphoniques du réseau londonien il y a déjà quelques temps. De plus, une cyberattaque aurait été également et récemment engagé. Difficile de prouver l’origine de l’attaque mais la coïncidence est trop suspecte pour la BBC et son responsable.Il faudra donc attendre pour savoir ce que compte faire la chaîne britannique et surtout si elle confirme la provenance des attaques.Le 15 mars 2012 à 15:00 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

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first_imgBerkowitz stands before a portion of his transition team while announcing his plan during a press conference. Hillman/KSKAAnchorage Mayor-Elect Ethan Berkowitz is developing a plan to transition into his new role. He says it will be created by a group of community leaders in his transition team and use input from public discussions and town hall-style meetings.Download Audio:“I’ve helped assemble this tremendous group of Anchorage residents with the idea that if we put together the right ideas at the right time we can have a profound impact on what happens with our city moving ahead,” he told a group of reporters during a press conference.“And I want to make sure the ideas we have are inclusive, I want them to be innovative, and I want them to be good investments for our city.”Berkowitz says the plan will include a timeline with short- and long-term goals. Within his transition team are five subgroups that focus on the economy and jobs, homelessness, public safety, administration, and Live. Work. Play. Berkowitz chose three leaders for his transition team: former Republican state legislator Andrew Halcro, Joelle Hall with Alaska AFL-CIO and CIRI vice president of land and energy development Ethan Schutt. They will host four different town hall-style meetings in different areas of Anchorage over the next six weeks.“Being mayor can be a solitary job, but this is a community. And in order for us to move the community forward the mayor’s goals need to represent and reflect the community’s goals and the community’s values,” Berkowitz said.“It’s going to be critically important for the city of Anchorage to have a transition document that reflects the goals of the city at large.”Governor Bill Walker went through a similar process, but Berkowitz’s spokesperson said the mayor-elect did not model his transition after the governor’s.The transition team will monitor the progress of Berkowitz’s administration after he take office to ensure that they are meeting the plan’s goals, he said. He did not announce any members of his administration. He takes office July 1.last_img read more

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first_imgMany European scientists cheered back in January when it seemed the court of the European Union would ease its restrictions on gene-editing technology in food. In a 15,000-word opinion, an advisor to the European Court of Justice suggested that gene-edited crops should not face the same stiff regulations as genetically modified organisms—as long as they don’t contain foreign DNA. The opinion was thought to be a step forward for European academic scientists who are trying to improve plant growth, resistance, and nutrition in everything from corn to grapes. But today, the full court put that opinion aside to rule that Crispr gene editing should face the same tough rules as GMOs.Experts say the court’s ruling will chill research on gene-edited crops both in Europe, as well as in developing nations in Africa. “This proves how stupid the European system is for regulating GMOs,” says Stefan Jansson, professor of plant physiology at Sweden’s Ümea University. “Many of us have tried to change things in last 10 years with meager success. When it comes to things like this, people listen to organizations like Greenpeace more than they listen to scientists.”The Luxembourg-based court ruled that crops created using Crispr and other gene-editing techniques are subject to a 2001 rule that imposes big hurdles for GM foods. The law exempts mutagenesis techniques such as irradiation, which changes an organism’s DNA but doesn’t add anything new. But it will apply to Crispr and other gene-editing techniques that use a form of molecular scissors to cut out bits of genetic material from the genome.Despite studies by European, British, and UN health agencies about the safety of genetically modified foods, European consumers have long opposed them, arguing that they benefit multinational corporations and harm the environment. US regulators say gene-edited crops don’t pose a problem because they are identical to ones developed through traditional cross-breeding techniques. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration and the Department of Agriculture regulate biotech crops. Gene-edited soybeans, flax, wheat, and other crops are preparing to enter the US market in the next year or two. But today’s European ruling may have bigger consequences in Africa, which is just beginning to see Crispr deployed to speed up plant breeding improvements. Nigel Taylor, an investigator at the Danforth Center for Plant Science in St. Louis, runs cassava breeding projects in Kenya and Uganda. He’s using Crispr to eliminate genes that cause the cassava brown streak disease, which can wipe out entire fields of the staple plant. He had just stepped off a plane from Kenya when he saw the news about the ruling.“It’s incredibly disappointing and very frustrating,” Taylor said from the St. Louis airport. “There’s a need in Africa for smaller farmers to secure their food supply and that means creating better crops. With climate change and urbanization, it’s important that agriculture can adapt. Gene editing was going to be a powerful tool to achieve that and it’s faced a setback.” The EU is Africa’s largest single trading partner, receiving nearly $16 billion in agriculture and food imports in 2017 from Africa, according to the European Commission. That means African farmers hoping to sell to European markets might not be able to take advantage of gene-editing improvements.Bode Okoloku grew up in Nigeria and is now an assistant professor of plant science at the University of Tennessee. He is researching the genetics of African sweet potato and corn varieties and works with breeders throughout the continent. “I think it might be the fear of the unknown that is driving the recent law,” he says.Crispr gene editing techniques are easier, faster and don’t require as much lab equipment as traditional GMOs, according to Okoloku. That’s why he and other scientists believe Crispr could be used by African plant scientists to create new plant strains needed in each country. “Using Crispr is more promising than developing traditional GMOs,” he says.Okoloku said that African scientists haven’t done a good job influencing policymakers in their countries about the risks and benefits of gene-editing as compared to GMOs. Danforth’s Taylor says the new ruling could stall his cassava gene-editing research projects in Uganda and Kenya. “The funding bodies that support the work will be asking questions, they want to see delivery to the farmer,” says Taylor. “There are hundreds of millions of small farmers who could have gained from that technology and that is now less likely.” More Great WIRED StoriesHow Google’s Safe Browsing led to a more secure webPHOTO ESSAY: The most exquisite pigeons you’ll ever seeScientists found 12 new moons around Jupiter. Here’s howHow Americans wound up on Twitter’s list of Russian botsBeyond Elon’s drama, Tesla’s cars are thrilling driversGet even more of our inside scoops with our weekly Backchannel newsletterlast_img read more

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first_imgThe state governor says the fire is expected to be completely extinguished in a few days. “We estimate a little more than 60 percent is already controlled. We hope that between today and tomorrow it can be fully controlled and that weather conditions allow us to do that,” he added. Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window) Luis Pérez, Civil Protection Coordinator of Carrillo Puerto, says that the Mexican Air Force helicopter has been of enormous help with water discharges in the fire zone where the entry for combatants is very dangerous. Román Uriel Castillo of the National Forestry Commission in Quintana Roo explained that the affected area is mostly grasslands. He says weather conditions and the presence of strong winds created flames up to three meters in height and columns of black smoke “that makes it look drastic.” Costa Maya, Q.R. — A forest fire that has been burning for several days near Muyil in the Sian Ka’an reserve has been reported as 60 percent contained. The governor of the state Carlos Joaquín González says that approximately 60 percent of the 2,500 hectare fire is finally under control. He said they expect the burned area to recover in a couple of months, adding that 126 people are working to control and extinguish the fire who are paying particular attention to preventing the fire from consuming nearby forest. last_img read more

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first_img___Then, this past Monday, Jess, who had flown in with Ellyson and her mother to Guatemala City, sat inside the Hookers’ room at the Radisson staring at the latest document. She couldn’t believe it.Her computer chimed, and with tears in her eyes, she made her way over to it. Someone back in Tennessee was calling her on Skype.When she saw that it was her brother, she turned on the camera.Before Jose could say hello or see her wet cheekbones, she hovered over the camera and covered it with a thin sheet.The paper read: “Daniel Ryan Hooker born in Quiche, Guatemala on December 2006 son of Jessica Russell Hooker and Ryan Hooker.Jose began to cry.Jess’ brother, Jose, had been adopted 22 years earlier, when he was almost 6 years old, from the same orphanage. That adoption took her parents three years to complete. He, too, had been born in Quiche.At one point, when things were really grim and there was no end in sight, Jose had said that he would go to Guatemala and adopt Daniel himself, since he was Guatemalan.And now, here they were. All they needed was Daniel’s Guatemalan passport, and his adoption visa.This time, Jess was sure, everything would work out. It said so right there on the paper. Sponsored Stories It wasn’t until that night, when they were in bed, that he told his wife.“I think I met our son,” Bubba said.At 28, Jess was five years older than her husband and the more practical partner. She listened quietly as he told her about his day with the boy, who wasn’t just cute, he said, but his name was Daniel, just like Bubba’s uncle who had just died. She was skeptical.“Uh oh,” she thought, “what has Bubba gotten us into?” But the next day, when she pulled the child into her arms, it felt like he was hers.The couple had always wanted to adopt; Daniel just sped up their plans. They immediately told the orphanage director and started the paperwork.Two months later, Guatemala’s thriving adoption industry fell apart.The country’s quick-stop adoptions had made the nation of 14 million people the world’s second-largest source of babies to the U.S. after China. But the vibrant business came to a halt after an August 2007 raid on what was considered the country’s most reputable adoption agency, used by many Americans.An investigation exposed a system of fake birth certificates and DNA samples, of mothers coerced into giving up children. Some claimed their children were kidnapped for sale. Adoptive parents paid up to $30,000 for a child in a country where the average person earns $5,000 a year. New Year’s resolution: don’t spend another year in a kitchen you don’t like Mary Coyle ice cream to reopen in central Phoenix Guatemalan birth parents poured into government- run centers looking for their missing children and ran ads in local papers.Guatemalan doctors, lawyers, mothers and civil registrars were arrested and prosecuted, with some convictions for human trafficking and adoption fraud. The Solicitor General’s office was put under investigation by a U.N.-backed commission against impunity.The Guatemalan government was forced to overhaul its adoption laws. The U.S. suspended all new adoptions from Guatemala.By the beginning of 2008, a new council had to be established to clean up proceedings, including verifying the identity of birth mothers and their willingness to give up their children.The old system, a mostly unsupervised network of private attorneys and notaries, was abolished.Daniel was among 3,032 children caught in limbo.___In October 2008, Jess traveled to Guatemala with her mother over her school’s fall break. It was her fourth visit.She expected to see Daniel running around, arms flailing with hints of baby talk.Instead, there was silence.Something was wrong, but she was not Daniel’s legal guardian. Jess couldn’t take him to see a pediatrician. Maybe it was normal considering that he was such a small kid, but she was worried. She was a special needs teacher. Five months later, Daniel still wasn’t talking.At the Radisson Hotel, where the Hookers started the first of many family visits, he would race to the window inside their room to watch the airplanes. He was obsessed with them. But when Bubba gave him headphones, Daniel always tore off the one in his right ear.He needed to see a specialist. The adoption could not come soon enough. They’d hoped their connections to the orphanage, their family’s story, would make things easier since some adoptions pending when the ban was imposed were being allowed to go through. Jess’s parents were missionaries who founded the charity Samaritan Hands, which ran the orphanage. Bubba sat on the charity’s board.Plus, his grandmother had been an orphan herself. And so was Jess’s younger brother, Jose.But though they had filed reams of paperwork, nothing seemed to be happening, and no one could tell them why. Finally, in May 2009, they got a call confirming a meeting with the adoption council’s head, Jaime Tecu. The Hookers were ecstatic.After hours in the waiting room with Daniel and Jess’ mom, Judy, who would translate, they were ushered into an office overlooking the south of the capital. The U.S. had forbidden new adoptions from Guatemala, but the pending cases were something else.She assembled a team of staff and immigration services experts to help Guatemalans sift through the files and find out which ones had the proper records, making five trips to the country herself.Of the original 3,032 cases interrupted at the end of 2007, officials found 180 cases of children still waiting to be adopted.The first of these cases was Daniel’s.Landrieu’s team worked with the U.S. Embassy and Guatemalan officials to broker an agreement that would allow certain cases to go forward if they met the criteria of both Guatemalan officials and the U.S. State Department.She contacted many American families to see if they were still interested, discovering that many couples had spent tens of thousands of dollars, traveling up to 20 times to keep contact with the children.Last December, the Hookers got a call saying they were one of 44 families whose cases were ready to move forward.It would still be another eight months before they embarked on Aug. 21, hoping to become the first of those families eligible to collect their child under the new agreement.Things were looking up. Clean energy: Why it matters for Arizona She was Daniel’s mother.___Early Saturday morning, they checked out of the Radisson for the last time. An airport shuttle arrived at Guatemala’s La Aurora Airport. Out came Jess and her mom, Bubba, baby Ellyson and Daniel. Everyone sported matching red-and-white Maryville High T-shirts. There was even a small one with a big embroidered M at the center for Daniel.At a distance Daniel could see his beloved planes as Jess carried him toward check-in.“I’ve been waiting so long to carry you like this,” Jess told Daniel.“Avion,” he replied, the Spanish word for plane, a huge smile on his face. He gave his momma a wet kiss and motioned to be put on the floor. He went over to Ellyson and started to open his arms wide and spun like a plane. She giggled and mimicked him.Meanwhile, Bubba was grabbing their boarding passes.After all his family visits, he’d accrued 700,000 frequent flier miles he had been saving for the day he would take his son home. Soon, they would be sitting in first class. The plane was set to take off just before 1 p.m.Jess prepped his bag full of knickknacks. Back in Maryville, friends and colleagues at school had thrown her a surprise baby shower. When asked how she thought Daniel would adapt to the room and house back in Maryville, she laughed.“I think he’s going to be a bit disappointed when we get home and he realizes there is no pool on our roof, no elevator, and he can’t watch planes from the window.”___As the family walked through the doors of the Louisville airport late Saturday night, friends cheered, then joined them in prayer.“WE’RE HOME!!!!!! We did it! We made it! And we can’t believe it!” the family said in an emailed message to friends on Sunday.“I wish you all could have seen Daniel’s face as he ran around our house exploring his new domain. He couldn’t believe he had his own room. He gawked at the size of our bathtub … It was AWESOME!”___Associated Press writer Romina Ruiz-Goiriena reported this story in Guatemala and Travis Loller reported in Tennessee.___Romina Ruiz-Goiriena on Twitter: http://twitter.com/romireportsAP Bottoms up! Enjoy a cold one for International Beer Daycenter_img Comments   Share   (Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) Construction begins on Chandler hospital expansion project Associated PressGUATEMALA CITY (AP) – It should have been good news.The U.S. Embassy called to say the Guatemalan government would begin to authorize adoptions five years after a scandal froze the system that sent as many as 4,000 Guatemalan children a year to the United States.Ryan “Bubba” Hooker and his wife, Jess, might finally be able to collect the little boy they wanted to adopt and bring him home. Top Stories It was not an easy way to live.They turned down a job offer overseas that they feared would have further complicated the adoption process.When Daniel was already 4 and there was still no end in sight, Jess gave birth to a daughter, Ellyson.On their visits at the Radisson when Jess was pregnant, Daniel would touch her belly and say, “Sister.”They hung photos of Daniel and Ellyson all over the walls of the two-story brick house on their Maryville cul-de-sac. They put a play structure in the yard and fenced it in for Daniel. In his bedroom, a large red airplane sat atop the armoire. His beloved plane.Jess felt like she was missing Daniel’s entire childhood _ his first steps, his first words.And then came some luck.In early 2011, the Guatemalan adoption fiasco came to the attention of U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu, who served on the Senate appropriations subcommittee on the State Department’s foreign operations and related programs, which dealt with foreign adoptions. She also presided over the Senate appropriations subcommittee on homeland security, which funds U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.She was also the mother of two adopted children.Landrieu discovered there was no list of people whose cases had been dropped due to Guatemala’s adoption ban. But Hooker wasn’t sure. This would be his 36th trip to Guatemala City. The 18-month-old toddler they had met in an orphanage was now a 6-year-old kindergartener. The couple had moved homes, passed up a job, spent untold amounts of money trying to adopt Daniel.If all went well, they were told, they would be the first U.S. family to adopt under the Central American nation’s new adoption laws.At least, that’s what they told him over the phone.On Aug. 21, an anxious Bubba boarded the plane for Guatemala City. All he had to do was get an adoption certificate, a birth certificate and a passport, meet with the people at the U.S. Embassy yet again, get an adoption visa, and then he and Jess could bring Daniel home.Maybe this time it would work.___Jess and Bubba had been married less than a year when they decided to go to Guatemala on a mission trip in June 2007.The day he met Daniel, Bubba had been working on the plumbing in the orphanage when he decided to take a break. He took a wander through the rooms and found the boy.The child was just 18 months old but looked younger, sitting stranded in a walker. He was the youngest kid in the orphanage, the frailest, too, with his pigeon chest and little legs that turned out. Bubba knelt beside the little boy and they began to play. Before long Bubba was holding him, then he fed him. He forgot about the plumbing. Check your body, save your life Daniel sat upright in a chair close to the director’s desk and fiddled with a toy car.And then the bombshell.“I’m sorry,” Tecu said, “your case is not registered with the Solicitor General’s office. It is not official.”Judy began to sob. Bubba was furious.Jess was crushed.Everything had to be investigated anew. Daniel’s birth mom needed to be found, tested for a DNA match and give consent for the adoption. The case also had to be transferred to a court in the district where Daniel was born.The Hookers filled out and submitted the same forms numerous times. They had a second home study _ translated into Spanish. But nothing changed.In May 2010, a weeklong trip turned into a three-week stay when the Pacaya volcano, about 25 miles (40 kilometers) south of Guatemala City, began spewing lava and rocks, blanketing the capital with ash and closing the international airport.The Hookers used the extra time with Daniel to take him to an audiologist.When the doctor walked in to give the results, they already knew _ Daniel was almost completely deaf.___The Hookers created a routine between regular trips to the Radisson in Guatemala and life back home in Maryville, Tennessee. Jess took advantage of holidays at the high school where she worked, while Bubba, a real estate developer, set his own schedule so he could visit Daniel every two or three months. Former Arizona Rep. Don Shooter shows health improvementlast_img read more

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first_img December 7, 2017 566 Views HOUSING mortgage OCC wildfires 2017-12-07 Nicole Casperson OCC Allows Banks and Associations Affected by Wildfires to Close Sharecenter_img On Thursday, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) issued a proclamation allowing national banks and federal savings associations affected by the California wildfires to close.Toney M. Bland, Senior Deputy Comptroller, Midsize and Community Bank Supervision issued the proclamation, which states:“Because of emergency conditions caused by wildfires in California, I find that emergency conditions exist pursuant to 12 USC §§ 95(b)(1), 1463(a)(1)(A), 3102(b), and 12 CFR §§ 7.3000(b) and 28.13(a)(1). Accordingly, the Comptroller of the Currency, or his or her designee, hereby authorizes national banking associations, federal savings associations, and federal branches and agencies of foreign banks at their discretion, to close offices in the areas affected by these emergency conditions for as long as deemed necessary for bank operation or public safety. In addition, bank management is encouraged to consult OCC Bulletin 2012-28, “Supervisory Guidance on Natural Disasters and Other Emergency Conditions” (September 21, 2012). This guidance lists some actions bankers could consider implementing when their bank operates or has customers in areas that are affected by a natural disaster or other emergency condition. Dated this 7th Day of December 2017.”In issuing the proclamation, the OCC expects that only those bank offices directly affected by the extreme emergency conditions to close. Those offices should make every effort to reopen as quickly as possible to address the banking needs of their customers.OCC Bulletin 2012-28 “Supervisory Guidance on Natural Disasters and Other Emergency Conditions” provides guidance on actions bankers could consider implementing when their bank or savings association operates or has customers in areas affected by a natural disaster or other emergencies. in Government, Headlines, Newslast_img read more

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