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first_imgNews Follow the news on Rwanda Covid-19 in Africa: RSF joins a coalition of civil society organizations to demand the release of imprisoned journalists on the continent April 6, 2020 Find out more RSF_en Receive email alerts Reports RwandaAfrica Reporters Without Borders today condemned the Rwandan supreme court’s sentencing of prominent exiled independent journalist Jean Bosco Gasasira to two and a half years in prison for allegedly calling for civil disobedience and insulting President Paul Kagame in the online version of his newspaper Umuvugizi. Gasasira told Reporters Without Borders that the week-long postponement of the hearing until today was probably to give the court time to find more convincing evidence against him. He has no right of appeal against the sentence. A charge of deliberately breaking the press law was dropped. He said he would not be intimidated by court’s ruling. “The government wants to mess up my life and stop me working, but the ruling is a desperate move by longtime predators of the media.” He would risk arrest if he returned to Rwanda.Gasasira has been threatened many times, beaten up in 2007, censored and hunted inside the country. He said his paper’s website has been hacked into in recent days and a bogus version, probably put together by government supporters, has appeared (http://umuvugizi.wordpress.com/). Gasasira says this would allow the government to see who reads the paper online and to post false news. Media freedom is Rwanda is extremely fragile and the government is trying to snuff out free and independent media outlets. President Kagame is on the annual Reporters Without Borders worldwide list of predators of press freedom.—————–29.04.2011Prosecutors request 10-year jail sentence for exiled newspaper editorReporters Without Borders is appalled by the Rwandan government’s determination to keep hounding one of its media bugbears, Jean Bosco Gasasira, editor of the bimonthly newspaper Umuvugizi and one of the country’s most outspoken journalists. Prosecutors yesterday asked Rwanda’s supreme court to sentence him to ten years in prison on charges on which the Kigali high court acquitted him last September. The request was made at a hearing at which he was not represented by a lawyer. Gasasira himself fled the country months ago.Gasasira is charged with spreading rumours that incited civil disobedience, insulting the president and deliberately violating Rwanda’s media law. The supreme court, whose decisions cannot be appealed, is due to announce its verdict on 27 May.Acting on orders from the most senior government officials, Rwanda’s prosecutors are clearly bent on convicting Gasasira at all costs. The aim for President Paul Kagamé’s government is to smear his reputation and make it impossible for him to return. Reporters Without Borders urges the supreme court to follow the high court’s example and dismiss the charges.Gasasira has been in the government’s sights for years and has often been harassed and prosecuted. Umuvugizi was suspended for six months on 13 April 2010 . As tension mounted in the run-up to the August 2010 presidential election, Gasasira went into exile in order to continue working, and launched an online version of the newspaper.He continued to upset the government with the articles he posted online and, on 3 June 2010, the Media High Council set a disturbing precedent for the flow of online information in Rwanda by giving orders to block Umuvugizi’s website . Two women journalists are currently detained in Rwanda . They are Agnès Uwimana Nkusi, the editor of the privately-owned bimonthly Umurabyo, who was sentenced on 4 February to 17 years in prison, and Saidath Mukakibibi, one of her reporters, who was sentenced to seven years in prison in the same case. Reporters Without Borders calls for their immediate and unconditional release. The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa Newscenter_img RwandaAfrica June 3, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Hunted journalist gets 30-month prison sentence to go further Help by sharing this information November 27, 2020 Find out more News Organisation February 13, 2020 Find out more BBC Africa’s “disproportionate and dangerous” dismissal of a journalist last_img read more

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first_img Top of the News 17 recommendedShareShareTweetSharePin it Subscribe Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Community News More Cool Stuff Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  The good times will roll as The Red Black and Green Honors Masquerade Gala will feature the flavors of New Orleans at 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Thursday, Jan 30 at the Rose, 245 E. Green St. Pasadena.The Mardi Gras in the City of Roses, put on by the Black History Parade and Festival will be held The Rose in Pasadena. It honors the youth and the people who make a difference in the community. The annual event is also a celebratory kickoff of Black History Month.“This is the 38th annual event and we are approaching our 40th,” said event coordinator Kenny James with the City of Pasadena. “What makes this event so special is the longevity and history of the group. We provide activities and education in addition to the festival for the community to come celebrate.”The gala honors two outstanding youth grand marshals, a celebrity grand marshal and a community grand marshal.“The mission is to educate on the history and to display excellence of Blacks within the community of Pasadena,” James said.There are several people whose work on the committee was noted by James, including Del Yarbrough and Rodney Wallace.But in addition to putting together the gala, it’s the Black History Parade that will take center stage in February.The Parade takes place from 10 a.m. to noon on Feb 15. The Parade begins at Fair Oaks and Figueroa in Altadena and heads south to Fair Oaks and Mountain Street.James said tremendous efforts contribute to the success of the annual Red Black and Green Gala. Wilson Middle School will perform in this year’s parade.“There are about 35 community members involved in the process,” James said. “And they each deserve recognition.”This year Wendi Racquel Robinson and Margaret Avery will serve as grand marshals is Margaret Avery, who played Shug Avery in “The Color Purple.” The 1985 role earned Avery a nomination for Best Actress in a Supporting Role. She has also appeared in “Blueberry Hill,” “White Man’s Burden” and “Proud Mary” among other films.Robinson rose to fame on the “Steve Harvey Show” and “The Game.” She has been nominated for 11 NAACP Image Awards, and won in 2014 for outstanding actress in a comedy series for her work in The Game.In 1996, Robinson co-founded the Amazing Grace Conservatory, a school that predominately serves children from 8 to 18 years old from disadvantaged socioeconomic backgrounds in the fields of the arts and media production. Robinson has served as the school’s Executive Director since its inception.This year’s community grand marshal, Edna Bluain, has played a vital role to Pasadena in her own quiet way.“Ms. Bluain has been very important to the community based on her volunteerism,” James said. “She works well with the seniors and the youth and does sponsorships for youth. She helps with resources for youth to stay in school.”The youth grand marshals are Alaysia Barker-Vaughn, who attends Loyola Marymount University. She is active in The Black Student Union, Sisters in Solidarity Club, Campus Life Ministry Community Program and Disability Service Program. In addition, she started a nonprofit that focuses on providing scholarships to students she mentors.Elijah Gates, a graduate of John Muir High School, attends UCLA on an athletic scholarship and his major is African-American studies. He is a mentor to Pasadena youth, he works with the Ronald McDonald House, STARS foster youth program, Union Rescue Mission and Boys and Girls Club events.Black History Month is something the entire community can celebrate, James said.“It’s important to celebrate Black History Month so people understand the value, the work ethic and determination,” he said. “It’s to make sure people are participating and giving back and making the community a safe place for people of all diverse backgrounds.”James said the most important function is to make sure the young people are aware of the importance of Black History Month.“This is about young people and to make sure they continue the legacy and pass the torch,” James said.Date: Jan. 30, 2020Time: 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 pmLocation: The Canyon at the ROSE 245 E. Green St. Pasadena, Ca. 91101Theme: Masquerade Gala.Cost: $65Tickets: www.BIT.LY/RBGGALAActivities: Food, Awards, Entertainment & DancingContact Kenny James [email protected](626) 744-7509 Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDScenter_img faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Make a comment Business News First Heatwave Expected Next Week Herbeauty6 Lies You Should Stop Telling Yourself Right NowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyLove Astrology: 12 Types Of Boyfriends Based On Zodiac SignsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Things A Man Will Do Only If He Really Loves YouHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Questions To Start Conversation Way Better Than ‘How U Doing?’HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Yoga Poses To Overcome Stress And AnxietyHerbeautyHerbeauty Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Community News Pasadena Black History Parade and Festival’s Red Black and Green Gala Lets the Good Times Roll By DONNA BALANCIA Published on Wednesday, January 29, 2020 | 5:37 am Community News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday last_img read more

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first_img Pinterest Local NewsBusiness Henderson Named Partner at Atlanta Firm Watson Spence Facebook Pinterest Twitter WhatsApp By Digital AIM Web Support – February 23, 2021 center_img TAGS  Previous articleU.S. FDA Accepts for Priority Review Pfizer’s Application for TicoVac™ (Tick-borne Encephalitis Vaccine)Next articleOklahoma vaccinations getting back on track after storm Digital AIM Web Support Facebook WhatsApp Twitter Watson Spence Attorney, Philip Hendersonlast_img read more

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first_img Pinterest Fake letter purporting to be from SDLP leader doing rounds WhatsApp Twitter The SDLP leader is warning his constituents of a fake letter being handed out purporting to be from him.The letters which he alleges have been delivered to houses in Derry ask people to financially support his election campaign.He says he is disgusted by the move and asks if Sinn Féin will condemn it.In a social media post Colum Eastwood said the issue has since been reported to the PSNI:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/eastwood5pm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Google+ Previous articleCalls for drug sniffer dog in Donegal backed by former Garda sergeantNext articleSSE Airtricity presents over €105,000 to 11 groups in Donegal News Highland Harps come back to win in Waterford Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty DL Debate – 24/05/21 Twitter Google+center_img Pinterest FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR By News Highland – December 10, 2019 AudioHomepage BannerNews Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction WhatsApp Facebook News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24thlast_img read more

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first_imgOne year on from GDPR – managing the data ‘snowstorm’ within occupational healthOn 3 May 2019 in General Data Protection Regulation, OH service delivery, Occupational Health, Data protection, Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. No comments yet. Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply.Comment Name (required) Email (will not be published) (required) Website This month (May) is the first anniversary of the arrival of GDPR, the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation. Dr Lucy Wright looks at how her occupational health firm, Optima Health, coped with the challenges brought about by this significant overhaul of how we need to keep, store, manage and protect data.We’re now one year on from the introduction of the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). This article is going to look at what the last year has felt like for us at Optima Health, as an outsourced occupational health provider, in the snowstorm that hit us with GDPR coming into force. There is no doubt that the idea behind the GDPR is one that we wouldn’t want to argue with – who doesn’t want data about us to be managed correctly?As you will no doubt recall, GDPR came in on 25 May last year, without a lot of guidance it has to be said. The guidance that there was predominantly related to financial services and marketing. There was very little even on general healthcare and nothing on occupational health, barring what Diana Kloss had done with the Faculty of Occupational Medicine. And the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has no specific guidance for our sector.About the authorDr Lucy Wright is chief medical officer at Optima HealthIn some ways, the run-up to GDPR felt like the run-up to the Y2K millennium bug, for those old enough to remember that, when we were all one minute past midnight on New Year’s Day not going to have any electricity, the hospitals were all going to stop and the planes were all going to fall out of the sky. It felt it was going to be like that. But of course the world did not end. Just like in 2000 we are all still here.I would, however, say the world has changed. So, what did we do in our organisation?Privacy and data management policiesFirst, we updated all our privacy policies – they’re the bit where it says “please read the terms and conditions” and we all just tick! But they are important.We updated all our data management policies and procedures – and that was fairly complicated without guidance – but we did our best, again using the FOM guidance. We did lots and lots of training for our staff. We trained them under the previous Data Protection Act anyway, because they are healthcare workers and they have ethical confidentiality duties. So we just kept on training.Subject access requestsSecond, we revised our subject access request (SAR) process, which is when people want to see their records. Even before last May we were down to the one month that it is now, rather than the 40 days that it was pre-GDPR. A very useful phrase that, “one month”. How long is a month? Do they mean a calendar month or even 28 days? We work to 28 days because it is safer because of February, so all the time we are slightly under-hitting.Breach reportingThird, we updated our breach reporting process. In all the years we have been working we have never needed to report a breach to the ICO, and suddenly the rules have changed. You had to “consider” before whether you reported – it was voluntary reporting – it is now compulsory reporting for certain types of breach. And you’ve got 72 hours to do it – if you are a controller, and I will come to that shortly.Contracts with suppliers and customersFourth, we updated our contracts with our customers and our suppliers, and that is no small job when you are a decent-sized organisation as we are – we employ about 750 staff. That was a lot of work.We received hundreds of questionnaires – actually it was probably more than that, it felt like a veritable snowstorm – from our customers, our suppliers; everyone it felt like. It got to the stage where we couldn’t reply individually to all of them; there were just too many.So we wrote a position document for all our suppliers and customers and said “here you go, take this”. At one time I had six people plus a lawyer trying to answer all these questionnaires before we drew a line under it.OH job opportunities on Personnel TodayBrowse more OH jobsKey issues and challengesWhat have been the key issues and challenges for us? There have been seven main ones.1) Controller versus processor. The big one that we’ve had has been are we the controller of our data for our customers? Or are they the controller and we’re the processor? Or are we joint controllers?Our in-house lawyer has one view – and it is shared by Diana Kloss – because he knows about occupational health. We have two external sets of lawyers who disagree. We have probably 90% of our customers who agree with us, and we have 10% who don’t, who agree with the other lawyers.Just for clarity, we believe we are the processor of the information. And that our customers are the controllers. However, that is not clear, and there is some very unhelpful guidance around healthcare, which lawyers who do not understand occupational health roll out to tell you that you are a controller.This is important because the person who reports the breach is the controller. The person who the SAR goes to is the controller. So, if I am a controller, I have 28 days to respond to an SAR. If I am the processor the controller has 28 days to respond. That means I have less time to give them the information that I am holding on their behalf to hand back to the person who asks.2) The fines. The question of the fines under GDPR is, naturally, an important one. We have had some corking contracts sent through to us by our customers.My organisation specialises in large companies. We are 750 staff strong – that’s biggish. But we’re not big compared to, say, an international very well-known manufacturer which sent us a contract that said we were responsible for all their fines.The maximum fine under GDPR for a breach is four percent of your global annual turnover. And quite frankly we laughed – we said “shall we just all go home now?”. We don’t make that in 40 years, let alone that we could pay that as a fine.So it is really important, if you are running your own occupational health service, that you check what the contracts are saying now about who pays the fines. Because your annual turnover is very different, probably, to your customers’ annual turnover.3) Role of consent. We got the issue of potential fines sorted, and that took a few months. We then moved on to “what do we mean by consent?”. There are various different criteria under GDPR about how you are allowed to process data.One of them is explicit consent. Thankfully, the guidance was very swift from Diana along the lines of “don’t be stupid”. Because that means at any point people can revoke consent and you’ve got to stop handling and storing their data. It has to go to the minute they say. But if that were the case occupational health wouldn’t be able to function.Then there is the basis of “by due contract”. So we have a contract with everybody that we provide the service to, and they have a contract with their staff. And occupational health falls under that and is also a basis for processing data so we don’t need to use explicit consent. We then had customers coming to us and saying, “when our staff refuse consent for a report to come out, because of GDPR don’t accept that and send the report any way”.This confusion is still leading to numerous conversations with data protection officers that the requirement under the GMC and the NMC and other professional organisations is that as healthcare workers we work with explicit consent. I’d advise, if you have that problem, Google “Diana Kloss FOM GDPR”. she has a lovely article on it, which I now have saved on to the hard drive of my computer and I post it to off to them! They stop arguing at that point in my experience.4) Increase in SARs. This has been absolutely massive; and it is becoming very onerous to deal with. It is costing us a lot of money but we cannot charge any more. And it is not just affecting occupational health. My husband is a GP, and it is now taking him 12 hours a week to read through SARs to make sure the data is correct before it goes out.That is one GP now doing a day’s less work clinically because he is just doing SARs. When I talk to colleagues who run their own practices, it is really common. We’ve had to recruit extra staff to deal with the SARs that we are now getting.5) Lack of case law around breach reporting. There are some guidelines out about what you need to report as a breach. However, there is no case law and the ICO has not prosecuted anyone. So we don’t know. Because we agree we are the Processor we don’t report any breach that we may cause; we report it to our controller and they make a decision as to whether they report the breach or not.We have been advising them, because obviously we deal with healthcare records all the time and we know the type of issue. But most of them are acting I would say in a very risk-averse manner. To date we have had four breaches that our customers as controllers have decided to report – we’re not proud of them but you will all recognise them: reports going out accidentally without consent. It happens and has been a case of individual error each time and people are very apologetic. But to put that into perspective, my organisation does over 15,000 assessments a month.Each time we have gone to our customers and have said “we don’t think this is reportable” and they have chosen to report the incident. And each time the ICO, thank goodness, has come back and said “thank you very much but we don’t think that is reportable”.Therefore, just to let you know, you can make a judgement and decide not to report. But be sure whether you are the controller or the processor before you do that. Incidentally, we’ve had one or two that we have had to do over bank holidays weekends, because 72 hours does not take account of public holidays. I am happy to say that not only did we do a table-top test but we did an actual test and it works, so that is nice to know that (although I would have preferred not to find out for real).6) Increase in employee complaints. We have received an increased number of employee complaints relating to data management. We all know the people who put in the SARs request can often the ones who are in conflict with their employers. Because most of us don’t care what our employer holds about us – good luck to them. It is going to be pretty dull. My appraisals for the last 20 years? You’re welcome to them. But I will only need them if I’m in argument with you.Complaints about SARs are normally one more stick with which to beat us and the employing organisation. But, again, these are now coming more frequently. The complaints come in and they don’t like the practitioner manner and they don’t like the opinion that the practitioner gave and then it always finishes with “oh and… I don’t think you’re handling my data correctly. And I’m going to the ICO.”We have many more ICO-reported complaints from patients than we have ever had before. Not one of these has been upheld. But you’ve still got to deal with them; you have still got to have an investigation; and unfortunately, they have still got to go on your ICO file.7) Keeping and transferring medical records. Then there is the whole question about the keeping of medical records, as the transfer of medical records when contracts move now, has become quite complicated.We’re still working under the premise that Diana has advised: that you work on the “exceptions” or “opt out” rule. You let everybody know that the records are going to move to a new provider, and they have the right to register an objection and opt out of that move. And if they don’t the records go. We are still doing that.We are however now having problems with some data protection officers and some lawyers we are dealing with who are saying “no, no, no it is absolute consent”; it is opt-in.And it can’t be. Because, if you got a note on a busy day when everything was kicking off at work that said “would you please write back saying you consent to your occupational health records being moved”, even we as OH professionals – who are interested in occupational health – probably wouldn’t sign that! There is not a chance that a tanker driver, or a school teacher or a police officer is going to sign that; they are just not.The faculty guidance still says opt out, and that’s what we’re going with.Where are things now?So, what does it feel like now? Well, it is settling down. It is still a bit frenetic. We are still getting lots of contracts, lots of questionnaires. Some of them are so late that you think “were you awake last May?”. We are now out of the blizzard and into, I’d say, the pretty, delicate snow flurries.I also have to say I don’t think the OH patient experience is any better for this at all. In fact, I think it is worse because there are a lot of organisations pushing their staff now by saying you do not need to give consent – we don’t need consent to refer you, we don’t need consent to get the nurse to see you, we don’t need consent to get the report to come to you. So I don’t think the patient experience is better at all.GDPR has been expensive, and I am not talking about the threat of ICO fines, as most of us probably will never be on the receiving end of one of those.But it is the fact the sheer volume of work that is required to comply with this legislation is so huge. And some of it is still ongoing. I’m not going to tell you that we have all our data mapping fully in place – we haven’t. We have some in places and have a big project on to do it, where does our data go, who holds it, where is it held? We are an organisation that delivers occupational health in almost any way that you could think of it. So our data is held in almost any way you could think of it. And it is a big job.It is still really difficult to get solid advice on specialist issues. We’ve had conversations with three lawyers, not counting Diana. And the opinions tend to be divided 50/50.One intriguing observation is that I have not had nearly as many requests for data deletion as I expected. I’ve had three, all of which I have turned down on the grounds that the GMC and NMC and the professional bodies say we have to keep a record of any consultation we hold. I’ve also so far not had any data portability requests, not one.Finally, it’s all about the time this takes. I am the chief medical officer of my organisation. Yet now, post-GDPR, I probably spend 60% of my time doing the medicine and 40% of time doing data – and that can’t be a good use of professionals’ time.But that is the way the world is at the moment.Where to go for help on GDPRGuide to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), Information Commissioner’s Office, https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-data-protection/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr/Guidance on the General Data Protection Regulation, Faculty of Occupational Medicine, http://www.fom.ac.uk/professional-development/publications-policy-guidance-and-consultations/guidance/guidance-on-the-general-data-protection-regulation Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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first_imgThe efforts of the JCR presidents on behalf of Nathan Roberts, ex Queen’s JCR President, to get him reinstated in the role, have been vindicated by the success of one small bear.The teddy bear, put up for election for JCR President by Roberts yesterday, was victorious with 51% of first preference votes.Roberts had been forced by the SCR to resign his position after achieving a 2:2 equivalent mark in prelims.Stefan Baskerville, OUSU President, 30 JCR Presidents and students of Queen’s college criticised the decision of the SCR and urged that they reconsider their decision.However, the SCR refused to allow Roberts the opportunity to appeal. With the triumph of Roberts’ teddy bear, the student body have defied the decision in a victory for JCR autonomy.All await a response from the College authorities.last_img read more

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first_imgSally Onesty, joined by her son, Zachary, during a 2017 Ocean City Board of Education meeting, continues her fight against opioid addiction following the overdose death of her son, Tyler. By Donald WittkowskiEver since her 22-year-old son, Tyler, died of a heroin overdose in March, Ocean City resident Sally Onesty has been helping other drug abusers to get into treatment programs.One of them is Dylan Craver, a former Ocean City High School star athlete who said he began taking the powerful painkillers OxyContin and Percocet when he was just 16 years old and later became hooked on heroin.Standing side-by-side, Onesty and Craver made an impassioned public appeal to the Ocean City Board of Education on Wednesday night to focus attention on what they say is the community’s growing drug crisis.Onesty urged the board members to confront the drug problem head-on, telling them, “Please don’t isolate this town or this district.”At the same time, she assured them that she had no intention to criticize or “bash the board.” She said she was seeking their help because they are in a position to “make a difference in a kid’s life.”“So please share his story to save a life,” Onesty said, referring to her son, who graduated from Ocean City High School in 2012.Joseph S. Clark Jr., the Board of Education president, told Onesty that the school district is committed to fighting the drug problem with her, declaring, “We can do better. We will do better.”“We have heard you. We haven’t buried our heads,” Clark said to Onesty.Board of Education President Joseph S. Clark Jr., left, and other school officials listen to Onesty’s remarks.In the weeks following her son’s death, Onesty took on the role of drug-prevention advocate and began reaching out to drug abusers in hopes of getting them treatment. She noted it wasn’t hard to find them. She simply looked in Tyler’s phone and saw their names and numbers.Craver, who acknowledged he was one of Tyler’s drug friends, told the board members he has been sober for 37 days and is preparing to move into a drug-rehab center thanks to Sally Onesty’s help.The 21-year-old Craver, who graduated in 2014, was a standout Ocean City baseball and football player before his drug addiction ruined his chances of winning a college scholarship. In an extraordinary public admission, he told the school board of his struggles with alcohol, marijuana, opioids and, ultimately, heroin.“Once you’re addicted, it’s hard to realize it,” he said.With Onesty standing next to him, Craver warned the school board members that the local drug problem may be far more serious than they realize.“Knowing what’s in this school scares me,” he said.Dylan Craver, right, a 2014 Ocean City High School graduate, told the school board about his spiral into drug addiction.Onesty, 46, the owner of A Bella Salon & Spa in Ocean City, wants the local schools to be part of a communitywide coalition of parents, students, the police, churches, hospitals and government officials to address the drug crisis.On Tuesday, Onesty met privately with Mayor Jay Gillian, Police Chief Chad Callahan, Superintendent of Schools Kathleen Taylor and members of City Council and the Board of Education to begin plotting strategy.“The fact that they invited me was pretty big,” Onesty said.A follow-up meeting is scheduled in May. In the meantime, some short-term measures are planned. They include placing drug-warning posters in the schools and also starting a text-messaging system to let students and parents know about a drug hotline, Onesty said.In March, the Board of Education approved a new policy to equip the school district with a potentially life-saving opioid antidote. The next step calls for the school physician to prescribe which antidote will be used and to determine who will administer it.Clark, the school board president, said in March that he wasn’t aware of any overdoses involving Ocean City students, but characterized the new antidote policy as a proactive approach toward Cape May County’s drug problem.The school district also has other programs focusing on drug education and drug prevention, Board of Education member Dan Tumolo said. It also has established a mental-wellness program following the suicides of two Ocean City High School students in the past two years, Tumolo said.Onesty, however, wants the school district to do more. She is calling for an array of wellness, treatment and drug-prevention programs for the schools.“I would like them to step up and be one of the leaders in compassion and prevention,” she said in an interview after the school board meeting.Onesty has teamed up with addiction expert Tonia Ahern, an advocacy field coordinator for the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence. Ahern, of Upper Township, is also a recovery coach for the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids and an advocate for Parent-to-Parent, an organization that offers support and treatment for drug addicts and their families.Ahern, who joined Onesty at the school board meeting, stressed that families are often reluctant to confront the problem and seek treatment because of the stigma of drug addiction, particularly when it involves heroin.“The only thing we can do is to get people help,” Ahern said.Councilman Michael DeVlieger proposed creating a drug-prevention program that would allow students to voluntarily take drug tests three times a year and reward them with incentives for being drug-free. The effort would focus on preventing the kids from every trying drugs.Ocean City Councilman Michael DeVlieger, another speaker during the school board meeting, lamented that children have easy access to illicit drugs.“Today, it’s easier for a kid to get heroin than a beer,” he said.DeVlieger proposed creating a community-based, drug-prevention program that would allow students to voluntarily take drug tests three times a year and reward them with cash or other prizes for staying clean.“I think the community has to come together,” he said.DeVlieger also told the school board that drug-sniffing dogs should be used to search students’ lockers three or four times a year, conducted in the off hours with one day notice to all of the parents and guardians. Onesty expressed concern that the use of drug-sniffing dogs in schools would harm the relationship that police are trying to establish with students in the fight against drug addiction. But she did say she supported drug testing.She noted that drug testing was part of the efforts by her family to save Tyler. Starting in 2014 and continuing to 2016, Tyler was placed in drug rehabilitation centers in New Jersey, Florida and California. Still, he couldn’t shake the addiction that would eventually kill him.He was found dead in an Atlantic City motel room on March 7, just days after he was kicked out of a local halfway house for refusing to take a drug test.Onesty’s decision to go public about Tyler’s addiction began when the family chose to livestream his memorial service on Facebook. His obituary disclosed that he died “from a heroin overdose, after a hard battle with addiction.”last_img read more

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first_imgFor complete details about this rental, including more photos, rates, amenities, availability, interactive map of the exact location, and reviews from previous guests, visit VROCNJ Listing #162 and contact the owner direct to save on booking fees!Isn’t quite what you are looking for?Search hundreds of Ocean City Vacation Rentals VROCNJ.com!Own a Vacation Rental in Ocean City, NJ? Advertise it on VROCNJ for as little as $249/year! NO Commissions or Booking Fees! List Your Property on VROCNJ.com Today! Address: 808 Delancey Place, Ocean City, NJ 08226VROCNJ Listing #162Welcome to your vacation on Delancey Place in America’s #1 Family Resort! You and your family will love your stay in this new, custom designed home in the north end of Ocean City, NJ. Located on the beach block, you will have a short walk to the beach, boardwalk attractions, shopping and restaurants. This house was designed with your family vacation in mind! Enjoy the open floor plan between the living area and kitchen – allowing for easy conversation and congregating! The kitchen boasts elegant granite counter tops, custom cabinetry, tiled back splash and all stainless steel appliances. Your family can comfortably enjoy meals and board games around a table for 6, with additional seating around the kitchen island. On the spacious, fully covered porch, you can enjoy outdoor dining as well as a place to relax with your morning cup of coffee or evening cocktail. The bedrooms comfortably sleep six, with additional room for two on the sofa sleeper.last_img read more

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first_imgPassions are clearly running high over the future of training in the baking industry, as bakery tutor Chris North so eloquently discourses in this week’s Friday Essay (pg 13).The relationship between the sector skills council Improve, employers and colleges has not been one without tensions over how to take the issue forward, while the path ahead has so far been beset by good intentions, but little action.An October conference on bakery training is being lined up by the Student Alliance (formerly the NFBSS/IBA Alliance) to address this, with the aim of getting the key industry decision-makers – from employers to student bodies – in one room to hammer out the future of bakery training. With plans still at an early stage, we will report details as and when they become available.In the meantime, big changes are afoot, with NVQ and SVQ qualifications set for an overhaul. Improve will unveil a series of new qualifications “designed by employers to deliver to employers’ needs, and to provide a pathway to enable individuals to get the skills they require”, says Paula Widdowson, communications director for Improve.common modulesFor the first time there will be specific pathways for learning for every type of baker at NVQ Level 2, with common modules applicable to all pathways. “At the moment, there are four or five qualifications in bakery,” she says. “Some might cover process, some might cover craft. Now, for the first time ever, there will be, for instance, a qualification specifically for a craft baker, an in-store baker or a highly automated plant baker. There will be common areas covered, such as cleaning, security, storage, distribution and retail.”A further five pathways will be available at Level 3, along functional lines such as management, improvement, technical skills and supply chain management.Qualifications will be obtainable either through on-the-job training, through colleges or through private training provision. “Because there are so many modules involved, they can be done in a variety of ways – some can be done online or through distance learning,” says Widdowson.”This hasn’t been done by Improve, sat on its own in an ivory tower. This has all been done with the help of hundreds of employers, responding to our consultation platforms and one-to-one meetings,” she says. So what have employers requested? “They’ve been asking to make the qualifications more relevant to their needs, to beef up the management side, to make the underpinning knowledge about how dough works at a relevant depth for the particular role, rather than blanket-cover everybody to the same level of knowledge. Employers want to pick and choose the relevant knowledge that is required.”Seven types of qualification will come into effect in September. Improve will be giving full details of them at an event on 6 July in Leeds, aimed at employers and employees, where there will also be an opportunity to sign up to modular courses.Meanwhile, the National Bakery School at London South Bank University has sought to improve the level of bakery training available by introducing a two-year Foundation Degree in Baking Technology Management. Upon completion, students can top up their qualification with either a BSc (Hons) Food Design and Technology or a BA (Hons) in Business Management. Head of the school Dr John Marchant says the course updates and replaces existing qualifications, which were either too theoretical in nature or too basic in content.This foundation degree will cater particularly for the needs of young people entering the industry and also for those already working in the baking industry, who may benefit from further professional development. Although there has been no formal publicity, the course has already received 10 applications.practical course”Improve suggested we set up a foundation degree and we began this process in consultation with industry. It has taken us two years to achieve this goal but we can now recruit for a September 2007 start,” says Marchant. “It gives students both a management and science outlook, but overall, it’s a very practical course.”He urged other colleges to follow suit: “We’re very lucky that we’re part of London South Bank University, which made it much easier to set up, but I would suggest that other colleges could affiliate with universities and do the same. All students would then have access to a foundation degree across the country, which would provide the baking industry with a firm footing for the future and bring us into line with other industries.” nl The Improve event, Pick Your Mix, will be held at the Royal Armouries Museum in Leeds on 6 July. For more information, email: [email protected]—-=== Future employment trends ===l skills required in the sector are increasing as time progressesl management positions will increase greatlyl the number of elementary jobs will continue to falll food scientists, NPD, traceability and legislation demands are critical areas for the industryl flexibility has to be increased to attract more females, ethnic minorities and older workersIndustry needsWhat food and drink sector skills council, Improve says the industry wants:l relevant and accessible productivity trainingl improved in-house and on-the-job trainingl improved clarity of communication on training and funding across the UKl regional group training for small to medium enterprisesl a conversion programme for food scientists—-=== New training course ===Starting in September, the Foundation Degree at the National Bakery School hopes to give:l A grounding in business knowledge to support the start-up and operation of a small business or the enterprise initiative to work with an international food companyl A practical and conceptual awareness of the wider environmental constraints acting on the baking industryl A range of practical strategies for creating, developing and sustaining the baking business or enterprise initiativesl A vocationally-based capability to enhance and/or develop novel ideas into a successful baking business or bakery-related enterpriseAny bakers who are willing to offer work placements are asked to contact Dr John Marchant at [email protected] Placements will start in June 2008 and run for 15 weekslast_img read more

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first_imgTwiddle is hitting the road this Spring with Midnight North! The Vermont-based quartet will kick things off in Syracuse, New York, heading West to Cleveland, Grand Rapids, Chicago, and more before going South for the SweetWater 420 Fest in Atlanta, GA. The Southern dates will continue in Charleston, Jacksonville, New Orleans, and more before heading back north to New Haven and Portland, Maine.Don’t miss out! Fan ticketing for Twiddle’s Spring tour goes on-sale this Thursday, January 19 with general public on-sale Friday and Saturday. See the band’s website for more details.last_img

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