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first_img Reporters Without Borders today condemned a Taipei court’s decision on 24 April ordering United Daily News reporter Kao Nien-yi to pay a fine of 30,000 Taiwanese dollars (770 euros) every day until he revealed his sources for a report about a financial scandal. The order was enforced three days running before being suspended today.“The judicial system must guarantee journalists the right to protect their sources so that they can work freely,” Reporters Without Borders said. “The government must include journalists in the list of professions that enjoy the right to professional secrecy under the law.”Kao’s story was about insider trading allegedly involving businessmen, government officials and companies. He is suspected of getting his information from a senior official who was investigating the case. Kao was already questioned over a similar case in 2003.The United Daily News and Kao said they “both regard the fine as a serious violation of press freedom and have decided to appeal.”Taiwanese law contains no provision for the protection of journalists’ sources, but grants other professionals such as lawyers and doctors the right to refuse to divulge confidential information. The judge acknowledged that Kao should have the right to protect his sources, but said the law did not accord him that right. He therefore convicted Kao of “protecting criminal activities and disrupting the financial market.”The Association of Taiwanese Journalists said in statement on 25 April that the confidentiality of sources was an essential right and that Taiwanese law should guarantee it. June 29, 2020 Find out more TaiwanAsia – Pacific to go further RSF_en November 20, 2020 Find out more Nearly half of UN member countries have obstructed coronavirus coverage Organisation Follow the news on Taiwan News TaiwanAsia – Pacific center_img News RSF to Taiwanese President: “Taiwan urgently needs media reform to tackle disinformation” Receive email alerts April 27, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Daily fines for reporter who refused to disclose his sources Help by sharing this information News News Taiwan: the non-renewal of CTi news channel’s licence does not go against press freedom May 18, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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first_img Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago  Print This Post Radhika Ojha is an independent writer and copy-editor, and a reporter for DS News. She is a graduate of the University of Pune, India, where she received her B.A. in Commerce with a concentration in Accounting and Marketing and an M.A. in Mass Communication. Upon completion of her masters degree, Ojha worked at a national English daily publication in India (The Indian Express) where she was a staff writer in the cultural and arts features section. Ojha, also worked as Principal Correspondent at HT Media Ltd and at Honeywell as an executive in corporate communications. She and her husband currently reside in Houston, Texas. The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago July 17, 2018 1,912 Views Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Appeals court Decision Fannie Mae FHFA Freddie Mac GSEs Treasury 2018-07-17 Radhika Ojha Previous: Michigan’s Lingering Housing Crisis Next: The Economy is ‘Considerably Stronger’ Says Powell The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago About Author: Radhika Ojha Related Articles in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News Sign up for DS News Daily center_img Tagged with: Appeals court Decision Fannie Mae FHFA Freddie Mac GSEs Treasury Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Appeals Court Finds FHFA Structure Unconstitutional Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Appeals Court Finds FHFA Structure Unconstitutional Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Fifth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals recently concluded that the leadership structure of the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) was unconstitutional. The three-member panel of judges led by Chief Judge Carl Stewart was hearing a case filed by three shareholders of the government-sponsored enterprises (GSEs) Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac against the FHFA, its Director as well as the Treasury and its Secretary.The shareholders contended that the Treasury and the FHFA exceeded their statutory authority under the Housing and Economic Recovery Act (HERA) of 2008 and challenged an agreement between the FHFA as conservator to Fannie and Freddie and the Treasury Department. Under the agreement in question, the shareholders claimed that the Treasury provided billions of taxpayer dollars in capital. In exchange, the GSEs were required to pay the Treasury quarterly dividends equal to their entire net worth in an exchange known as the “net worth sweep.” The shareholders were unhappy with the bailout out terms of this agreement and filed a suit arguing that the agreement rendered their shares valueless.They also contended that the agreement was arbitrary and capricious under the Administrative Procedure Act, 5 U.S.C. § 706(2)(A) (“APA”), while claiming that the FHFA was unconstitutionally structured because it was headed by a single Director, “removable only for cause, does not depend on congressional appropriations, and evades meaningful judicial review.”After the hearing, the three-member bench dismissed the shareholders’ statutory claims and granted summary judgment in favor of the FHFA and Treasury on the constitutional claim. “Because we find that the FHFA acted within its statutory authority by adopting the net worth sweep, we hold that the Shareholders’ APA claims are barred by § 4617(f),” the judges ruled. “But we also find that the FHFA is unconstitutionally structured and violates the separation of powers. Accordingly, we affirm in part and reverse in part.”A recent ruling by a New York Judge had also upheld a previous ruling that said the Bureau of Financial Protection (BCFP) was unconstitutional for the same reason.Read the detailed ruling and background of the case here.Learn More about recent BCFP rulings:CFPB vs. PHH Dismissed: RESPA Enforcement ImplicationsCFPB vs. PHH—An Unexpected Conclusion Share Save Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Subscribelast_img read more

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first_imgBoys and Girls Club of Miami Dade(MIAMI) — The college dreams of two teens in South Florida are looking brighter — and a bit less stressful — after they were each awarded six-figure scholarships at Beyonce and Jay-Z’s recent concert in the Sunshine State.On Friday, Emily Garay, 17, of Miami Beach, and Jonathon Burgos, 17, of Kendall, were attending “On the Run II” at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens with their friends from the Boys and Girls Clubs of Miami-Dade.PHOTO: Beyonce and Jay-Z in concert at On The Run II Tour in Miami, on Aug 29,2018.PictureGroup/EPA via ShutterstockBeyonce and Jay-Z in concert at “On The Run II Tour” in Miami, on Aug 29,2018.Garay, in her last year at Miami Beach Senior High School, learned that she’d been awarded a $100,000 scholarship from the BeyGOOD and the Shawn Carter foundations. The Boys and Girls Clubs of Miami-Dade said in a news release that the program had provided Garay a “safe haven” to grow since she’d joined its South Beach Club at the age of 9.“Emily is the type of person that, once she sets herself to a goal, she will do what it takes to achieve it,” the club’s news release said.Garay said the scholarship was a huge deal for her family — who had been trying to figure out how to pay for her college education. She plans to major in criminology at Florida International University.“My mom was thinking of working for two jobs,” Garay told CBS4 Miami. “We were just stressing ever since I started high school.”She said her parents came to her mind first when her name was called during Friday’s concert.“They now could have peace,” she said. “This is the best thing that has ever happened to me in my life.”DJ Khaled, who was on hand to present the award to Garay, then announced that he’d be awarding his own $100,000 scholarship to Burgos.Burgos joined the program’s Kendall Club when he was a young child. The Boys and Girls Clubs said he was a senior at Southwest High School and “learned how to come into his own as leader by embracing what he learned at the Clubs.”Burgos wants to attend the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston and major in electrical engineering.“With this gift, I know I’m going to be able to accomplish anything now and maybe even more,” Garay said.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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first_imgE4C/iStock(KINGMAN, Ariz.) — A wildfire in Arizona dubbed the Flag Fire has burned 600 acres since it was reported Sunday afternoon.The blaze started between the Flag Mine and Wild Cow Campground in the Hualapai Mountains, which is about 11 miles south/southeast of Kingman.Evacuations have been ordered for some communities as the smoke spreads.A helicopter crew will do a reconnaissance over the fire area Monday to get a better sense of the impact, officials said.The cause of the fire is under investigation.Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img

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first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Secondary messages were then chosen to illustrate how todeal with back pain in a work context. These were: An innovative approach to back pain stipulates the best wayto tackle back problems – Stay active Previous Article Next Article  www.workingbacksscotland.com Scotland has taken an innovative approach to the issue ofback pain management, as Professor Gordon Waddell explained in his presentationto the conference. Working Back Scotland is a joint NHS Executive and HealthEducation Board of Scotland project which was launched in October. It involvesa wide range of partners in an attempt to improve the management of back painin Scotland. – Use simple pain relief – Get help from your GP or OH department. “We had a lot of trouble getting the message across tosome professional groups,” said Waddell, adding that Working Back Scotlandwas one of the first attempts in the world to get the message across to thepublic. – The shorter time you are off work the less risk you haveof developing chronic paincenter_img Resource packs with an easy-to-read format were producedtargeted at health professionals, employers and employees and radio advertswere played on 15 stations which reached 60 per cent of Scottish adults. “The Royal College of General Practitioners put a lotof work into developing guidelines, but no effort has been put intoimplementing them,” he said. The project was based on the RCOGP and Faculty ofOccupational Medicine guidelines, which, Waddell said, are the best and most upto date in the world. These guidelines were condensed and key messages pickedout. These were: – You do not have to be completely pain-free to return towork A survey questionnaire carried out each month since thestart of the campaign showed that the proportion of respondents who believedthat rest was the best treatment for back pain dropped from 54 per cent to 36per cent after the adverts were aired. The basic aim of the campaign was to provide consistentadvice to all health care professionals, employers and the 60-80 per cent ofpeople who get back pain. Advice included how to deal with the condition andprevent unnecessary disability. Comments are closed. – Employers, employees and health professionals can supportyou at work. Back pain message hits home to publicOn 1 Jun 2001 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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first_imgCyanobacteria synthesize a large variety of secondary metabolites including toxins. Microcystins (MCs) with hepato- and neurotoxic potential are well studied in bloom-forming planktonic species of temperate and tropical regions. Cyanobacterial biofilms thriving in the polar regions have recently emerged as a rich source for cyanobacterial secondary metabolites including previously undescribed congeners of microcystin. However, detection and detailed identification of these compounds is difficult due to unusual sample matrices and structural congeners produced. We here report a time-efficient liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) precursor ion screening method that facilitates microcystin detection and identification. We applied this method to detect six different MC congeners in 8 out of 26 microbial mat samples of the Svalbard Archipelago in the Arctic. The congeners, of which [Asp3, ADMAdda5, Dhb7] MC-LR was most abundant, were similar to those reported in other polar habitats. Microcystins were also determined using an Adda-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Adda-ELISA). Nostoc sp. was identified as a putative toxin producer using molecular methods that targeted 16S rRNA genes and genes involved in microcystin production. The mcy genes detected showed highest similarities to other Arctic or Antarctic sequences. The LC-MS precursor ion screening method could be useful for microcystin detection in unusual matrices such as benthic biofilms or lichenlast_img read more

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first_img Google+ Facebook Pinterest Twitter Two suspects arrested in connection with Waterford Glen Apartments deadly shootings Pinterest Google+ Previous articleMan, 25, charged with arson in connection with Hickory Village ApartmentsNext articleElectric vehicle maker makes plans to move into AM General plant Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. WhatsApp By Jon Zimney – December 17, 2020 0 378 WhatsApp IndianaLocalNews Facebook (Photo supplied/ABC 57) Two men have been arrested in connection with a deadly double shooting at Waterford Glen Apartments in South Bend.The shooting happened on Oct. 22 and resulted in the deaths of Malik Balderos, 21,and Ricky Kinds, Jr., 20.Dijon Marcus Davis, 18 of South Bend, was arrested and booked into the St. JosephCounty Jail on preliminary suspicion of murder and an outstanding unrelatedwarrant.Darius Jamal Vaughn, 19 of South Bend, was arrested and booked into the St. JosephCounty Jail on preliminary suspicion of murder.Both arrests are still under review by the St. Joseph County Prosecutor’s Officeand no formal criminal charges had not been filed as of late in the day on Wednesday, Dec. 16. Twitterlast_img read more

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first_imgIn a move that brings together the leadership of the libraries of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) and the Harvard Library under a single individual, Sarah Thomas, vice president for the Harvard Library, has been named to carry forward plans for increased cooperation and communication as the Roy E. Larsen Librarian of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.In that role, Thomas will oversee all FAS libraries, according to an announcement today by Dean Michael D. Smith.The appointment comes just over a month after Thomas became vice president following six years as head of the libraries at the University of Oxford in England.Her dual leadership roles will be independent from each other. She will report to Smith on FAS matters, working toward better coordinating operations in the FAS system while still preserving the individual identities of each library, Smith said in an email to the faculty.“I’m very inspired by Drew Faust and her articulation of ‘One University, One Harvard’ and the benefits that can accrue to the parts by sharing their knowledge, their expertise, their collections, their facilities,” said Thomas during an interview at Wadsworth House. She called the FAS appointment “thrilling.”“If you look at what’s happening in the world today in terms of educational and research partnerships, there is a growth in global collaboration,” she said. “So if we can’t practice what we preach at home and have our own individual libraries work together or have our own Schools work together, how can we partner with Singapore or another part of the world? We have to learn how to put in place those modes of working together.”“A long and happy marriage”University Librarian Robert Darnton said Thomas’ vast experience makes her an “absolutely perfect” fit to lead the Harvard Library and the FAS libraries. “I think she was the best conceivable choice for Harvard,” said Darnton, Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor and a member of the Library Board. “She has such a spectacular career, and she’s so good with people and such an expert with books.”At Oxford, Thomas was Bodley’s Librarian, the first woman and non-British citizen to hold that post in 400 years. Before that, she was University Librarian at Cornell University for 11 years, served as president of the Association of Research Libraries, and held positions at the Library of Congress, among others.“She will be instrumental in helping the library to have an adequate place in the capital campaign,” Darnton added, noting the library’s fundraising needs.James Engell, Gurney Professor of English Literature and professor of comparative literature, said Thomas’ management style “seems to be extremely good. She seems to be tough-minded yet listens very well. She understands the complexities of Harvard’s libraries. And she understands that Harvard libraries have been going through a lot of transition in the last five years.”Engell, who is vice chairman of the Library Faculty Advisory Council, said that having a single person running the Harvard Library and the FAS libraries “makes sense” given the overarching goal of better connecting the libraries.“The thing that impresses me most about Sarah Thomas is that, with her experience and intelligence, she understands all of these complexities, and she does so without any factiousness or friction or ideological slant or preset sweeping goal in mind as she comes into this position,” he said. “There may be a honeymoon period, there may not, but my prediction is that it’s going to be a long and happy marriage.”At the invitation of Deputy Provost Margaret E. Newell and the Harvard Library Board, Thomas was brought in last January as a consultant to identify the libraries’ needs and propose how best to address them following what some would characterize as an unsettled period.“I was really struck by how important the library was, how much people cared about their library,” said Thomas of her winter visit.Her decision to leave Oxford, she said, was prompted by a sense of loyalty to the institution that first gave her a chance.“I’ve been associated with Harvard for a large part of my adult life in one way or another, and I thought, ‘Gosh, if there’s a way I can help bring this institution together, I would like to do it.’ ”“Indispensable for about five minutes”A Massachusetts native, Thomas grew up in Williamsburg, a tiny town in the foothills of the Berkshires. She traveled just nine miles down the road to attend Smith College in Northampton. After graduation, she set out for Cambridge to find her first job while she considered going off to law school or perhaps becoming a writer. Thomas found a position — as a searcher and filer at Widener Library.It was, she says, most certainly not love at first sight.“I never wanted to be a librarian,” said Thomas. “One of my best friends had come to me in my senior year of college and said, ‘Oh, Sarah, I know what I’m going to do, I’m going to go to Simmons [College] and be a librarian.’ And I thought, oh my God, that’s terrible!”After working at Widener, Thomas decided to go to graduate school to study German (in which she eventually earned a Ph.D.), and approached the inimitable Carol Ishimoto, then-head of technical services, to announce that she was leaving.“I went to tell Carol, and she said, ‘Oh, Sarah, I’m devastated. How will we ever replace you? This is dreadful.’ That was about 11 o’clock in the morning,” said Thomas. “At 1 o’clock, I came back from my lunch, and she had just appointed my replacement. I was indispensable for about five minutes!”Thomas said the experience stuck with her during her four-decade career. “It was a good lesson for me to learn that no one is really indispensable,” she said. “And it taught me humility.”It wasn’t until returning to Widener from abroad and being offered the chance to study library science with some financial help from Harvard that Thomas reconsidered a career that had once sounded unglamorous.“What I did see once I was inside a great library [like Widener]: Here you were in a place where the scope and scale of what was being done — and the depth of expertise, the knowledge that people had — was phenomenal.”“Getting people what they need”Although she knows that the libraries face a host of complex challenges that she will be expected to help overcome, Thomas said she has “not come in with any preconception” about how things ought to be handled.“I actually prefer to have … lots and lots of discussion with people about what are their priorities and to inspire people to think of creative ways to do things.”In the short term, Thomas said, she will focus on practical goals. “I need to learn more about what people are doing here at the University. Not just what’s in the library, but what the strategic goals are for the Schools and for the University. I need to then think about how we insert ourselves into that activity so we are supporting and collaborating in that.” Also, she’ll concentrate on “understanding the financial underpinning to make sure it’s sturdy [enough] to support those initiatives.”Asked how she intends to meet the needs of faculty, Thomas said, “The short answer to that is: People want more books. And I need to get them more books because that’s what they want. But the more nuanced answer might be: Which of these books do we need to own and store here centrally, or are there other ways to meet people’s needs and not spend as much on purchasing, ordering, cataloging, and storing material?”As for the collections, Thomas said the library has already prepared a report outlining strategic objectives for building content, which has been widely discussed and endorsed by the Library Board, and the next step is to continue those “worthy” efforts.Longer term, she intends to address the “twin pillars” for collections: expanding digital initiatives so more of the library’s archival treasures can be accessed, not only by Harvard scholars and students but by scholars around the world, and also making sure that Harvard’s paper-based collections of primary-source materials are preserved and accessible.“There’ll be a very strong commitment to developing collections because I think that’s an area where there’s been anxiety or dissatisfaction,” Thomas said. “We want to get people what they need and make sure when they want something, they know they can have it.”last_img read more

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first_img First-year seminar focuses on the 19th century oil portraits of 25 Native leaders captured in an era of forced relocation Art and the history of indigenous America While sorting indigenous-language materials as a graduate research assistant at Tozzer Library, Sadada Jackson came across a 1903 English-Ojibway dictionary printed by Canadian missionaries, an 1832 spelling book in the Seneca language with English definitions, and an 1857 journal handwritten in Cherokee.Jackson, who earned a master’s of theological studies at the Harvard Divinity School this past May, was so struck by her findings that when officials at the library, which houses anthropology and archaeology collections, asked her to do a public exhibit based on her work, she accepted with enthusiasm.“It was an opportunity to give back and leave an offering for inspiration; a way to honor the past and take heed of the future,” said Jackson, who dedicated the exhibit to the speakers of indigenous languages and to “all who are listening.”Curated by Jackson, “Our Land Our Language: Reflecting on North American Indigenous Language Materials” will be on display at the front entrance of Tozzer until June. It includes two maps of the U.S. and Canada with the precise areas where indigenous languages were spoken in 1903 and 1915 highlighted and overlay indigenous-language texts. The maps were created by J.W. Powell, who was head of the Bureau of Ethnology from 1879 until 1902.For Jackson, an African American and a member of the Natick Nipmuc tribe, the exhibit gave her the chance to curate a display intended to help visitors deepen their understanding of native cultures. She also aimed to give people of indigenous descent a place to find a piece of their history.“I wanted to create a space for people who are indigenous, whether they speak or not their indigenous languages, where not only they can be themselves, but also inquire about themselves,” said Jackson. “It’s important for all marginalized people, especially black and native people, who often were not seen or were gazed upon, to have a space where they can see themselves reflected.”,Jackson, who spent a year surveying part of the indigenous language materials at Tozzer, helped organize part of its North American collection, which now features 122 items in 24 languages, including Apache, Inuktitut, Mohawk, and Zuni. Among them are dictionaries, manuals of grammar and vocabulary, spelling books, catechisms, hymns, and gospels translated into different native languages. They can be viewed online at Zotero Library.But the work is not finished. Tozzer, which has one of the world’s largest anthropology collections, with an emphasis on the indigenous peoples of the Americas, continues to grow its North American collection. It is also in the process of surveying indigenous materials of South America and Mesoamerica.Making materials available to the broader community remains a goal for library officials. Susan Gilman, the Tozzer’s librarian, recalled the powerful impression left by the visit of a Navajo elder who examined some texts housed at the library. When he read the texts aloud, everybody in the room was shaken, she said, as the words came to life.“We often get requests from people working on books and dissertations, but less so from the general public, and we’re open to the public,” said Gilman. “It is wonderful to make these materials more visible to not just scholars but community members.”Having a wider range of individuals engage with library materials will likely yield insights that may shed fresh light on research and scholarship, said Gilman, and is a strong reminder of how personal stories from the past can touch people in the present. Professor reckons with his family’s history in a study of his talented, if eccentric, relative’s art A colorful figurecenter_img Such was the case with Jackson, whose grandmother, Mildred Selden, was also a black Nipmuc. The exhibit is interwoven with Jackson’s personal narrative and includes a video of her reading a letter to her grandmother. In it she recalled that the older woman, who was paralyzed from the neck down for the last 13 years of her life due to an injury, taught her how to listen and think about language beyond words — a skill she employed while planning the display.“The exhibit is the beginning of a conversation, and at the base of that is honest listening,” Jackson said. “I hope it inspires people to see beyond the video and the maps and start to make changes they need to make so that this kind of history doesn’t repeat itself, so that we don’t ever have to have languages that are lost.” The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. Relatedlast_img read more

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first_imgThinking about the edge of anything evokes a level of anxiety that is equal parts exhilaration and apprehension. This feeling is no different for IT professionals who are tasked with deploying, operating, securing and managing IT resources outside the controlled — relatively safe — confines of the data center.Today, Dell Technologies is expanding our portfolio of edge solutions with new offerings that help you overcome the apprehension of edge computing so you can spend all your time feeling the exhilaration – and the benefits. The newest offerings in our portfolio are designed to help you address the challenges of unbounded data at the edge.Bring IT to the point of data creationIt wasn’t long ago that we were talking about the challenges of “big data.” Collecting, storing and analyzing vast amounts of data was truly a challenge. But that was back when data was “just” big. The challenge then was getting enough storage and processing power into the data center.Fast-forward ten years and the challenge has expanded beyond the walls of the data center. Gartner predicts that “by 2022, as a result of digital business projects, 75% of enterprise-generated data will be created and processed outside the traditional, centralized data center or cloud – an increase from the less than 10% generated today”[1]. But this data is not your traditional data, it is unbounded and time-sensitive. It streams from mobile phones and devices. Generating value from data requires harnessing it and generating insights at the point of data creation — quickly, cost-effectively and securely.A new era of data creates new challenges for ITIt’s easy for end-users to think of data as intangible bits of information that magically appear at their fingertips the moment they’re needed. But IT knows better. Data of this size has mass. And when you combine big data with decentralized data creation and consumption, you trigger a whole new set of IT challenges.Successful IT leaders are rethinking the placement of applications and infrastructure, moving them as close to the point of data creation as possible. Moving IT infrastructure outside the data center introduces several constraints that IT leaders need to address.Locational: Bandwidth and network connectivity is limitedEnvironmental: Open to the elements or housed in dusty environmentsDimensional: Needs to fit in tight spacesElectrical: Subject to less-than-ideal power and cooling conditionsOperational: Far away from skilled IT staffSecurity: IT needs to control and monitor security outside the confines of the data centerOvercome edge constraints with new solutions from Dell TechnologiesDell EMC is answering these challenges with new solutions designed to help you extract value at the point of data creation while managing constraints.The new PowerEdge XE2420 supports edge operations and analytics in space-constrained, harsh environments. A low latency, short-depth system, the XE2420 has the flexibility to add up to four accelerators and 92TB of storage per server.For the most extreme environments, the PowerEdge XR2 brings together rugged compute in a smaller footprint. Built from the ground up for harsh environments, the PowerEdge XR2 exceeds certifications in shock, vibration, dust, humidity, and electromagnetic interference (EMI) for military and maritime applications.The new iDRAC9 with datacenter license, adds streaming telemetry to the PowerEdge portfolio. Now IT professionals can use AI to gain insights into the management of systems from the core to the edge. And because streaming delivers up to 10,000 times more efficiency than polling (1 vs 17,780 http requests) iDRAC9, customers can expect greater efficiency when gathering data in edge environments.The new Dell EMC Streaming Data Platform enables ingestion and analytics of real-time streaming data. With tiered storage, organizations can enjoy the ability to call back historical data for analysis alongside their real-time streaming data for endless knowledge and business intelligence.Let Dell Technologies help you #FindYourEdgeWhile apprehension is a natural feeling when extending beyond the limits of your data center, Dell Technologies can help you replace that apprehension with exhilaration. Dell partners with our customers every step of the way, linking people, processes and technology to accelerate innovation and help you #FindYourEdge.[1] Gartner. “Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends for 2020”, October 2019.last_img read more

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