Month: January 2021

first_imgNotre Dame’s Office of Information Technology (OIT) hosted the Mobile Summit, an event designed to showcase the University’s technological capabilities, gain student and faculty perspectives and inform people on the expanding use of technology on campus Wednesday. The event, which took place in the Eck Hall of Law, featured panels, addresses from students and faculty and seminars about mobile technology on campus, according to the event’s website.   English professor Elliot Visconsi said students’ mobile devices have the capability to change their classroom experience. “These devices allow for students to be more hands on,” Visconsi said. “Students now have the ability to create rather than just receive information.” Visconsi said mobile devices, like the iPad, allow for collaboration among students. “If I wanted a student to come listen to me read a script or give a lecture I would give a podcast, and that’s not interesting,” Visconsi said. “I think of my courses as a seminar, a discussion enhancement.” Visconsi said mobile devices have the ability to foster this discussion, even in a large classroom setting. “Mobile devices have the ability to make large classes small,” Visconsi said. Visconsi said he believes the iPad is one of the best educational tools and hopes it will be come costly enough for every student and faculty member to possess one on campus. Visconsi said he is in the midst of developing a class that features the use of the popular tablet device at the center of the learning experience. “The challenge will be getting faculty and students to understand what is distinctive about the device and how it can change their experience,” Visconsi said. Academic Technologies Consultant Jon Crutchfield said he did not anticipate the recent boom in mobile technology. “Ten years ago not many people had a cell phone, now you have a device that is a very powerful computer that can access data sources, GPS, and the Internet all in your pocket,” Crutchfield said. Crutchfield said following the first Mobile Summit in 2009, OIT decided to focus their resources on two main areas of technology: mobile and video. “I think we’ve chosen wisely,” Crutchfield said. “These two areas have grown exponentially in the past years, and will continue to evolve.” Crutchfield said OIT has created convenient tools for students’ mobile devices, which include the creation of “m.nd.edu” (a mobile version of nd.edu), which allow students to access features like campus maps, dining hall menus, grades and other resources on their mobile devices. Crutchfield said, along with mobile and video, OIT will focus on collaboration. “There are so many tools now that allow for students to collaborate in real time on a document,” Crutchfield said. “We just expanded the use of Google, instituted Box (a cloud collaboration program), and are working to make programs like Sakai more mobile friendly.” Crutchfield said there is a renewed interest in communicating these new capabilities to students and faculty, which is one purpose of the Mobile Summit.  “A lot of people just aren’t aware of these things,” Crutchfield said. “We need an emphasis on how we can we inform students of what we have, and then help them take advantage of those things.” Crutchfield said this event is a good venue to bring faculty and students together to discuss the rapidly changing world of mobile devices. “The Mobile Summit allows for us to learn how people are using their devices, synthesize this information, and deliver more and better services,” Crutchfield said. Contact Ben Horvath at [email protected]last_img read more

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first_imgOn Saturday, Notre Dame presented Italian architect Pier Carlo Bontempi with the 2014 Richard H. Driehaus Prize, the most significant recognition for classicism in the contemporary environment, according to the Notre Dame website.Michael Lykoudis, the Francis and Kathleen Rooney Dean of the Notre Dame School of Architecture, said the prize was started by Richard Driehaus 12 years ago with the goal of furthering the use of tradition in the modern world.“The work that [Bontempi] has done has been all about focusing on the local character,” Lykoudis said. “He builds with consistent principles while also adapting those principles to the climate and geology, including aspects in the work that tie back to its location.”According to Notre Dame’s website, Bontempi, who originates from Fronovo di Taro, Parma, Italy, studied architecture at the University of Florence and has taught architecture at universities across America and Europe. He is most noted for his block recovery plan in Parma’s historic center, the Place de Toscane and the “Quartier du Lac” resort near Paris.“Bontempi is unique in that he doesn’t see architecture as an art that calls attention to an architect, but to the building’s central place,” Lykoudis said, “While there is a great deal of beauty in his work, he is very modest in creating quality work.”According to Lykoudis, Driehaus believed the $200,000 award and bronze statue would act as sufficient incentive to fuel the practice of classicalism and traditionalism with an emphasis on sustainability in modern architecture.Lykoudis said the Driehaus Prize allows Notre Dame to engage in the practice of advancing the use of tradition in the modern world while Notre Dame’s national recognition as a top university allows the prize to grow in stature.According to Notre Dame’s website, recipients of the Driehaus Prize are distinguished architects who are skilled in the areas of traditional or classical architecture, contribute positively to society and whose work focuses on sustainability and innovation.Each year, a panel of judges evaluates the work of various architects and comes to a consensus on the winner.The 2014 panel members included Adele Chatfield-Taylor, president of the American Academy in Rome, Robert Davis, developer and founder of Seaside, Fla,, Paul Goldberger, a contributing writer for Vanity Fair and Witold Rybczynski, award winning architecture critic and professor. The panel also included Léon Krier and Demetri Porphyrios, past winners of the Driehaus Prize.Bontempi possesses all of the qualities the panel values, Lykoudis said.According to the jury citation, Krier said “the serenity and robustness, elegance and economy of [Bontempi’s] considerable built work demonstrate the falsity of the economic, philosophic, technical, artistic argument as excuses for the catastrophic performance of the common contemporary building industry.”Tags: architecture, Pier Carlo Bontempi, Richard H. Driehaus Prizelast_img read more

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first_imgAt the 35th reunion for the Notre Dame class of 1979 this summer, alumnus Mark Gallogly and his wife, Lise Strickler, announced their intent to donate $10 million to Notre Dame in support of mental health services.“We wanted to make the gift to recognize our great friend Fr. Jim McDonald and to focus on an issue that we think is important, which is mental health of students,” Gallogly said. “Jim’s 30th anniversary as a priest was the opportunity to both recognize him and the work that he’s done and at the same time provide resources to something that we feel strongly about.”The donation will endow the newly-established Rev. James E. McDonald, C.S.C., Center for Student Well-Being in honor of McDonald, a former associate vice president and counselor to University President Fr. John Jenkins.“That whole program is a key priority for us over the next three to five years,” Bill Stackman, associate vice president for student services said. “It’s going to change the way we work and how we take care of our students.”Strickler said the gift resulted from conversations between Gallogly and McDonald, who were classmates in the Program of Liberal Studies — then called the General Program — at Notre Dame. Gallogly said he and Strickler initially identified mental health as the target for their donation after observing the effects mental illnesses had had on people they knew.“College is a time of great exploration, growth and learning,” Gallogly said. “At the same time, students move away from friends and family, have newfound freedom and face intense academic pressure. This combination can lead to a variety of mental health issues.“Some of our extended family and friends, a number of good friends and the children of friends have experienced real mental health issues while in college. It seemed like it is a really important thing and an area of great need.”Though Gallogly and McDonald approached Notre Dame on their own initiative with the desire to support mental well-bring, the University already had plans for the additional mental health services it wanted to offer if it had the funding, Gallogly said.“When we first raised this with Fr. Jim, he was excited about the idea,” Gallogly said. “And then when we together raised it with the University, they immediately embraced it.”“We hope this can increase the speed with which the University can provide substantial mental health services, increase the effort to prevent mental health issues and decrease the stigma associated with mental health problems,” he said.Stackman said he and his team in the Office of Student Affairs developed a strategic plan that includes four priorities for mental health services: creating “holistic and integrated health and wellness unit,” “enhancing the care that we provide to athletes,” establishing the McDonald Center for Student Well-Being and increasing awareness of “students with emotional challenges.”“So to strengthen our ability to identify and support the needs of individual students with emotional challenges, including but not limited to anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, suicide ideation, self-harm and eating disorders,” Stackman said. “That by itself is one of our core priorities.”Strickler said the University’s plans reflected a response to national trends of college students suffering from mental illness and of universities attempting to address those concerns.“I think there is also a sense nationwide that this is an area that is underfunded at many universities,” she said. “We were excited because when we approached Notre Dame it was clear they were also thinking deeply about mental health. They had already identified this as an area where they wanted to be best in class.”The University appointed Kelly Hogan Stewart as director of the McDonald Center on Aug. 25. Hogan Stewart said the Center has incorporated both the staff and the mission of the former Office of Alcohol and Drug Education (OADE) into its broader plans for supporting preventative work for students’ mental wellness.“[The OADE’s] role was to do early intervention and education surrounding choices of alcohol and drugs,” Hogan Stewart said. “There was a little bit of a prevention component to it, but there was also an intervention component. We are shifting that, making it more comprehensive as far as addressing overall well-being, overall wellness, health promotion and also focusing a lot more on prevention as opposed to intervention, which is a totally different approach.”Hogan Stewart said “the sky’s the limit” for how the Center will enact preventative measures with a “public health approach.” The overall strategy will focus primarily on education campaigns and tactics to increase visibility and awareness of issues that most critically impact the student body, she said. Currently, there are no set plans for specific programs.“Things drive the areas that a health-promotion unit actually addresses will be driven by data, long-standing tradition and things that campus partners, students, deans, other administrators may tell us that are important here on this college campus,” Hogan Stewart said.“What I’ve been doing most recently is digging into data and finding out, what really are our hot-topic areas?” she said. “Is it sleep? Is it anxiety? Alcohol and drug choices? I don’t know; I’m still digging into the data, but that will drive what our focus will be.”Hogan Stewart said intervention-based services like counseling remain available to students through the University Counseling Center (UCC), but her staff will focus on shifting attitudes to prevent mental illness and support those who suffer from it.“When you look at it systematically, the rectors are doing one-on-one interventions, [and so are] your faculty members, so when you look at that environmental approach there still are those one-on-one conversations or interactions, ” Hogan Stewart said. “We will continue to do that, but how it looks within the Center, it’s still to be determined.”Hogan Stewart said the Notre Dame community should keep “being patient and managing expectations” as the Center begins to make plans to initiate programs.“We’re being strategic in how we develop the Center, so it’s something that we’re actually recrafting, rebranding and starting from the ground up in some ways,” she said. “To go through that change model on a campus sometimes will take over a year, so hopefully by this time next year, students will say, ‘Oh, yeah, there’s the Center for Student Well-Being,’ and they’ll have benefitted from some of those services that we provide, or resources or education.”Gallogly said his and Strickler’s ultimate hope was to offer services both to students grappling with mental illness and to those who aren’t sure how to support their friends who suffer. He said he hopes the Center will give students the “context” and “confidence” to confront mental health issues.“As a friend when you see someone struggling in school, do you know what to do?” Gallogly said. “… And then as a person who’s struggling with mental health issues, do you think your friends, the University and others will help you get through the issue?”“Whether you’ve left the University temporarily or whether you’ve stayed at the University … if you don’t have the right resources, what happens? You may get into a deeper hole,” he said. “The quality and speed of the professional resources, a real focus on prevention, … on educating the community, this combination can result in a decrease in the stigma of mental health problems — those are the goals we hope for.”Tags: donation, Irish State of Mind, McDonald Center for Student Well-Being, Mental health, mental illness awareness, Student Affairs, UCClast_img read more

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first_imgInspired by the New York Times Magazine’s “The 1619 Project,” the Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership (CWIL) director Mana Derakhshani, along with Office of Civic & Social Engagement (OCSE) director Rebekah Go and junior Tyler Davis, organized the circulation of dozens of posters around Saint Mary’s that feature provocative quotes from the series. “If we do not endeavor to learn about the past, it is harder to make sense of the present and find a way to a better future” said Derakhshani about the necessity of bringing the posters to campus.  The 1619 Project is a commemoration of the arrival of the first enslaved Africans to Jamestown, Virginia, 400 years ago. On its website, The New York Times Magazine describes The 1619 Project as “a special project that examines the many ways the legacy of slavery continues to shape and define life in the United States.” Gina Twardosz The posters, designed by junior Tyler Davis, feature quotes from essays displayed on the 1619 Project website. The quote on this poster is from Khalil Gibran Muhammad’s essay, “The Barbaric History of Sugar in America.”Davis said she sees the project as a reminder of all the contributions African Americans have made throughout history, with a focus on the current plight of American Americans in this country today.  “The 1619 Project is kind of like a memorial, or reminder, of the first known slave ship hitting American shores,” she said. “It highlights the results of Africans being brought to America, and it discusses capitalism, stereotypes, music and all the contributions African people brought to America. It makes people aware of the influence [African Americans] have in this country today.”In reference to the creators of The 1619 Project, Davis said she believes the project was created to further educate people on the value of African Americans in America. “I think they put it out there so we can all further know the truth of the African American experience and the contributions they made to this country,” she said. “[The 1619 Project] is an attempt to educate people on the value of life and bring more humanity to us.”Derakhshani said she felt the posters would be an accessible way for students to engage with the history of slavery and bring attention to The 1619 Project itself, as Derakhshani believes that “the present has its roots in the past.” “I thought it would be good to find a way to educate the campus about the significance of the year,” she said. “I believe that it is important to acknowledge the history of slavery in the U.S. and that most people remain quite ignorant, so my purpose was to educate. There are a number of articles on the website that may help to better understand where we are in the U.S. currently in terms of race relations.”Davis designed the posters, and she said she wanted to make sure they were impactful but not off-putting to some who may still be learning about African American history. “As a black person, I want people to know my history without being afraid of it,” she said. “I don’t want people to be afraid to ask questions. I see these posters as a positive resource for people who are curious and who want to ask questions constructively without fear.” Davis, an art major with a minor in justice studies, said art is akin to advocacy and her interest in studio art has allowed her to pursue various creative avenues while still letting her engage in current political discourse. “When I first came to Saint Mary’s, I was an anthropology major, but I knew that something was missing,” she said. “I wanted to create, so with art I can still pursue all of those things like anthropology, global studies, justice and philosophy, yet still be able to create and educate through visual means.” Davis said she sees the posters and The 1619 Project itself as “a movement towards education and change.” “It’s the 400 year anniversary of 1619, and many things have gotten better for black people, but we know that for so long people wanted to oppress us and keep us ignorant,” she said. “I want people to ask questions and not to be afraid of sounding ignorant. We know that you don’t know, and we want you to educate yourselves on the matter because our livelihoods are affected by people not knowing about us. Ignorance can be violent and harmful, so all we’re asking you is to meet us halfway.”Tags: African American, Art, slavery, The 1619 Projectlast_img read more

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first_imgStock Image.JAMESTOWN – A convicted sex offender was arrested Monday after allegedly failing to report his change in address.The Cattaraugus County Sheriff’s Office says Bryan Carroll, 31, of Jamestown, was arrested on a bench warrant issued in Cattaraugus County Court.Deputies say Carroll was indicted on two counts of failure to register as a sex offender and failed to appear in court for arraignment.Carroll was taken into custody and held at the Cattaraugus County Jail. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img

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first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Stock Image.WARREN – Officials in Warren County, Pennsylvanian say a body has been recovered part of the search for a vehicle that crashed into the Allegheny reservoir this week.The Warren County Coroner’s office confirmed the news Wednesday afternoon.Although, the U.S. Forest Service, who lead the initial search, did not release additional information.Late Monday, 911 dispatch received a call that a vehicle crashed into the water. A search then began and continued Tuesday. First responders say the search originated at the Webb’s Ferry Boat Launch after Cattaraugus County’s 911 center received the call. Information was then transferred to dispatch in Warren.last_img read more

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first_imgMGN ImageALBANY – Governor Andrew Cuomo has added additional state’s to New York’s travel advisory list.In a bulletin Tuesday morning, the Governor announced Minnesota, New Mexico, Ohio and Wisconsin are now among 24 states on the list.The Governor says all state on the list have significant community spread of COVID-19, and those traveling from the states must quarantine for 14 days upon entering New York.Yesterday, Cuomo announced a travel enforcement operation at airports across the state to help ensure travelers are following the state’s quarantine restrictions. The full, updated list of states on the travel advisory is below:AlabamaArkansasArizonaCaliforniaFloridaGeorgiaIowaIdahoKansasLouisianaMinnesotaMississippiNorth CarolinaNew MexicoNevadaOhioOklahomaSouth CarolinaTennesseeTexasUtahWisconsinCuomo says Delaware has been removed from the list after it fell below the qualifying metrics. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_img 1. NEWS: “Call Me Maybe” Pop Princess Carly Rae Jepsen to Make Broadway Debut in Cinderella 4. FEATURE: Chita Rivera Drops the Ball, Spidey Turns Off the Lights and Zachary Levi Breaks Up with B’way In Our New Year’s Datebook Broadway.com’s end-of-year features delighted fans over the holiday season. From hot shows and news stories to most anticipated debuts of 2014, our most-read stories covered everything you need to know to kick off a new year of theatergoing. Click below to catch up on the top 10 stories from December 27 to January 2: 6. FEATURE: Best in Show! Broadway.com Names the Top Five Shows of 2013 7. INTERVIEW: Broadway’s Sexiest Man Alive Exposed! Jarrod Spector is a Subway Freak, Game Show Nerd and Beautiful Hypochondriac 2. FEATURE: Looking Ahead! Broadway.com Picks the Five Most Hotly Anticipated Debuts of 2014 View Commentscenter_img 9. FEATURE: Top Casting Director Jen Rudin Offers Audition Advice for Stagestruck Kids and Their Parents 10. FEATURE: What a Lady! What a Year! Pippin’s Patina Miller Voted Broadway.com’s 2013 Star of the Year By Fans 8. FEATURE: Closing Time! Seven Great Plays and Musicals To See Before They’re Gone 5. FEATURE: Live-Tweeting Musicals in Our PJs is Our Favorite Thing, Drag is the New Black and More Lessons of the Year 3. FEATURE: Big Breaks, Tragic Falls and a Naked Starlet in a Tub: The Top News Stories That Got You Buzzing in 2013last_img read more

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first_img All the Way How cool is it to be working with Bryan Cranston, who is at the height of fame right now— You don’t know that! He could get even more famous. [Laughs.] Michael McKean Show Closed This production ended its run on June 29, 2014 See McKean in All the Way, opening March 6 at the Neil Simon Theatre. Would you ever want to star in another Broadway musical? You really hit the ground running with Hairspray. Hairspray was a lot of fun to learn—but a year and a half later I was back with The Pajama Game and that was hard. I had two big spotlight dances but also all the choral dances and everything. Getting into that stuff, at the time I was 58, and it’s like, enough is enough. There are parts I’d love to play, but I don’t think it would be on Broadway. But you never know! This is your second political play on Broadway in a row—what about All the Way hooked you? I was in Ashland, Oregon—my daughter [Nell Geisslinger] is an actress up there—so we were up there seeing some shows, and this play about LBJ sounded interesting to me, it was called All the Way. The very next day, [producer] Jeffrey Richards called me and said, “Hey, I hear you’re up in Ashland, why don’t you see this play called All the Way?” I said, “Well, I already saw it!” So a couple of months went by and he called me again, and he said, “Well, we’re gonna do the play, and do you want to play Hoover?” After two political roles on Broadway, would you ever want to run for office? Never! Never! I can’t imagine a worse life. I have my own superpowers. I don’t need someone to elect me to have power over other people. It’s awful just to have your life turned upside down and shaken loose. It’s just crazy. I don’t need that House of Cards thing. I love watching, but I ain’t gonna be in it! Star Files Do you remember the incident? Yes, I was standing on the curb and that controversial yellow light came up and one woman decided she wanted to make a left at exactly the same moment that a guy thought he was gonna charge through the yellow light, and they collided and double-teamed me. I’d love for there to be a cautionary tale, but you can’t tell people not to stand on the corner and wait to cross, ‘cause that’s what you’re supposed to do! [Laughs.] Touché! How does having this superstar in the cast change the experience? I’m a big Breaking Bad fan, and the guy’s incredible, but it’s turned out to be more than that. He’s transformative. This is a guy who finds whatever there is to be found and he makes strong choices. He’s right on the money. Bryan’s star is very bright, but his LBJ is brighter. It’s active and it’s a real guy and he’s just doing a magnificent portrayal. Speaking for theater fans everywhere, why hasn’t Waiting For Guffman [which McKean contributed lyrics to] become a musical? Chris [Guest] and Eugene [Levy] looked at it—there are people who want to do Best in Show and Spinal Tap as musicals… The main problem, I think, in adapting any of these for the stage is these films were created improvisationally and because they were documentary-style, the viewer was essentially a character. I don’t think that works the same way on stage. Plus, Guffman’s got some great songs in it, but you can’t do a musical with only five songs. Related Shows This is a juicy role—how did you approach embodying J. Edgar Hoover? A lot of characters in this play, online, you can find them speaking extemporaneously, but you can’t find that with Hoover because he never did anything that wasn’t rigidly prepared. He was a stammerer when he was a kid, so I think his control of his image became very important to him. So I did some research on his life and tried to get a feel for what the guy is like inside. In this case, it’s a very simple action in this play, just to destroy Martin Luther King. He felt that King was a communist, and an organized black revolution could be the kind of trouble that he couldn’t address. He had a pretty good-sized ego and he thought he could defeat world communism. He was afraid of anything he couldn’t control. It’s so wonderful to see you back on Broadway after your accident—how are you feeling? Oh, I’m fine. I broke my leg, and I’m really lucky that that’s all that happened. I did some physical therapy in Los Angeles and I encountered people who are in much worse shape than me. I was up on the stage about six months after it happened, so I’m very lucky. View Comments Has it changed the way that you walk around the city? No. My wife, [actress Annette O’Toole] won’t use that corner now. If we’re walking together and we get to that corner, she says, “No, let’s go down and cross over here.” I say, “Well, the corner isn’t what hit me.” In over two decades on the Great White Way, Michael McKean had never missed a performance—but in 2012, on his way to perform in The Best Man on Broadway, the stage and screen star was struck by two cars, sending him to the hospital in critical condition. Now, the Laverne and Shirley, This Is Spinal Tap, Best in Show and SNL funnyman is back with a vengeance in a new dramatic role, playing FBI director J. Edgar Hoover opposite Breaking Bad star Bryan Cranston as President Lyndon B. Johnson in All the Way. Below, McKean chats with Broadway.com about returning to Broadway after his accident, sharing the stage with Walter White—err, Bryan Cranston—and his thoughts on a Best In Show musical.last_img read more

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first_imgIt’s finally Friday, and we think you deserve a reward. No, not peanut butter cups—the Lessons of the Week, of course! Every Friday, Broadway.com recaps the craziest things we’ve learned in the last seven days. Ready to be shocked, amused and just a little bit angry? Great! Check out this week’s lessons below.Meryl Streep Steals Broadway RolesThe great and powerful Meryl has been cast in another film remake of a Broadway show—Master Class. We can’t wait to see her Streep it up as Maria Callas, but we’re hurt she hasn’t appeared on actual Broadway in almost 40 years. What are you afraid of, M? Jazz shoes? Tiny dressing rooms? The occasional roach? What?This Xmas, Give the Gift of Idina MenzelFa-la-la-la-la, la-la-la moo. Yep, If/Then leading lady Idina Menzel has announced that she’s recording a Christmas album. But there’s one catch: She’s Jewish. Hey, works for us! We’ll keep it right next to our other favorite, the John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John holiday album. Ooh-ooh-ooh, honey.Vampires Will Suck in a Musical (Again)First there was Dance of the Vampires. Then Dracula. Then Lestat. But alas, every vampire musical thus far has been a major flop. Will the in-the-works musical adaptation of True Blood be the exception to the rule? Hey, as long as it has sexy vampires ripping their shirts off and biting people’s necks, we’re there.Wait, Lea Michele Has More to Say!Glee star Lea Michele’s new memoir Brunette Ambition taught us tons of useful info, like how to make gluten-free pizza with a fried egg on top. But the Broadway babe has so much more material, she’s writing a sequel. Maybe she’ll remember to thank her Glee mama this time.What Happens on B’way Stays on B’wayWe’ve been betting our bottom dollar that the new musical remake of Honeymoon in Vegas would dance its way to New York next season—and luck be a lady, our dreams have came true! Bring on the singing Elvises, pole dancers and endless buffets! We’re ready.Nothing You Read About DanRad Is TrueThe Cripple of Inishmaan star Daniel Radcliffe wants to set a few things straight: He does not have a giant bronze statue of himself at home, he does not order beer from monks, and he is not getting married soon. That’s his evil twin, Raniel Dadcliffe. Get it right, people.B’way’s Beginning to Look Like HogwartsSpeaking of Raniel Dadcliffe, his pal Rupert Grint is riding his broomstick to New York to star in It’s Only a Play (with a ton of other big stars) next season. Wow, two Hogwarts students on Broadway in the same year? This is fantastic news! Your move, Hermione.You Can Now Step on Kristin ChenowethIf you’ve ever wanted to throw cigarette butts and used gum on your favorite Broadway stars, now is your chance! Kristin Chenoweth, Daniel Radcliffe (not to be confused with his evil twin), Jim Parsons, Paul Rudd and more are being inducted into the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Come on, boots! Start walking!Tupac Was a Theater GeekOn opening night of Holler If Ya Hear Me, Tupac’s brother Mopreme told us something else awesome about the late legend: He loved blasting Les Miz in the car. Damn, this is information we really could have used when we were getting beaten up in middle school.Lindsay Lohan Needs a Wake-Up CallThe screen star has announced she’s planning to make her West End debut in Speed-the-Plow, despite being a no-show on some important press opportunities. Lindsay, we know you’ll probably oversleep and miss some performances, but let’s make a deal, OK? As long as you don’t pull a Piven and get mercury poisoning, we’ll call this whole thing a success. Idina Menzel Star Filescenter_img View Commentslast_img read more

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