Tag: 江苏苏州龙凤论坛

first_imgGeorge Navarro led all scorers with 38 points, but he needed 39 as his second of two free-throw attempts with one second remaining rattled and rolled off the rim, ending a non-conference road game against the Eureka Loggers in heartbreak for the Hoopa Warriors who’s comeback attempt fell just short in an 82-81 loss Monday night at Jay Willard Gymnasium.The Warriors, who fell behind 23-7 in the first quarter of Monday’s loss and entered halftime down 51-39, would not have been in position to …last_img

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first_imgThe Associated Press reported this week on the growth of lightsaber dueling in France , after the French fencing federation gave the nascent sport its official blessing.The International Fencing Federation, or FIE, said Tuesday that although it doesn’t include lightsaber fencing as one of its official disciplines, it is “interested in how this new event progresses.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesResponding to AP questions sent two weeks ago, federation official Serge Timacheff said the FIE has been in touch with France’s federation about lightsaber events, rules, and equipment.By email, Timacheff said: “We are always watching new trends in swordplay, and we are interested in observing the development and adoption of it in the French Fencing Federation.” PDEA chief backs Robredo in revealing ‘discoveries’ on drug war Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Grace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusations ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes Urgent reply from Philippine ‍football chief Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss MOST READ View comments LATEST STORIES PARIS — The international governing body of fencing is giving a qualified thumbs-up to France’s embrace of lightsaber duels.ADVERTISEMENT Boxing official warns time running out in Olympic standoff Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

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first_imgHALIFAX — Unfiltered and emotional social media postings are emerging as a potent tool for critics of Canada’s health system, though some observers are dubious they’ll prompt lasting changes.In Nova Scotia, the latest example came recently when a team of three emergency physicians posted a GoFundMe campaign to raise money for long-term care beds — a campaign rapidly expanded through Twitter.Soon, online commentators suggested this would be the health system’s equivalent of food banks — charity supplementing what should be a basic public service.“This is an initiative to get the conversation going,” said Dr. Rob Miller, one of the three doctors involved, adding that fundraising is secondary to the advocacy.The doctors say the underlying problem is that elderly patients awaiting nursing home care are occupying beds at the Valley Regional Hospital in Kentville, N.S., creating a logjam in admissions and cascading into long waits in the emergency unit.Their posting came on the heels of a viral video — viewed 2.6 million times on Facebook — made by Inez Rudderham, a frustrated young Nova Scotia mother who says she waited two years for her cancer diagnosis. She has said she was without a family doctor and had to repeatedly visit an ER before being referred to a specialist.Meanwhile, in Newfoundland and Labrador, the mother of a 10-year-old child who spent two weeks in Janeway Hospital in St. John’s posted Friday that she observed four cases of 24-hour shifts pulled by nurses in the unit.Howard Ramos, a Dalhousie University sociologist who studies social media, says the initial power of the posts depend on whether they touch a chord online.In the case of Rudderham’s story, “it hit a nerve that many people feel they’re experiencing … It shows many people across Canada are having trouble accessing health care,” he said.At the Nova Scotia Health Authority, the flow of negative postings draws a mixed reaction.Dr. Mark Taylor, the interim co-vice president of medicine at the agency, says in the case of Rudderham, it has led to an internal review.“The good news is that it brings to the public problems that are real in our system and encourages us to find solutions to these problems,” he said in an interview.“The unfortunate thing is that what is put forward on social media may not be entirely accurate and only one side of the story is brought forward.”The young mother said in her video she had to seek care in emergency departments and was only diagnosed after three trips to the ER. She also says she won’t be able to get the mental health services she needs to deal with the stress brought on by her ordeal until July.Taylor said he can’t comment on details of the case due to privacy concerns, adding his staff were still attempting to reach her on Tuesday.Meanwhile, he says the doctors in the Kentville ER have a valid point about hospital crowding leading to backups in the emergency room.“We need a greater emphasis on discharging patients, including improved home care services, improved capacity of patients to be managed in alternative locations,” he said.However, he also said, “I personally wonder if GoFundMe campaigns will achieve funding for long-term care beds. I’m not sure how that will work.”Rod Drover, a spokesman for Eastern Health, the largest health authority in Newfoundland and Labrador, said legislation prevents him from discussing details of the cases such as the one posted Friday in St. John’s.“There have been no changes to nursing staffing arrangements at the Janeway intensive care unit for years, as the existing staffing ratio is based on national standards of best practice for ensuring quality of care,” he wrote.The agency accepts the reality of social media, “as a communications tool,” but — like Taylor — Drover says there’s a risk of inaccurate information spreading.Katherine Fierlbeck, a political science professor at Dalhousie University, said in cases like Rudderham’s video, a posting can highlight “underlying structural problems” in a powerful way.For example, it suggests there’s a massive difference between simple access to some kind of primary care — such as walk-in clinics and ERs — and access to the regular and consistent care of a skilled family doctor.Still, some health care problems, such as the public outcry over a lack of access to family doctors, are complex.Nova Scotia’s ratio of 257 doctors per 100,000 people is the highest in the country. And yet there were 51,119 people on a waiting list for a family physician in the province as of March 1.Fierlbeck notes that these statistics don’t reflect key details, such as data suggesting physicians in the province may have to spend more time on patients who are older and sicker than in other provinces.Meanwhile, the political scientist says when political parties — such as Nova Scotia’s Liberals — have tied their core electoral promises to budget control, they don’t easily shift to growing the health budget.“You’re going to have to commit a certain amount of money and the more you commit, the less positive the fiscal management part of your portfolio looks.”— Follow @mtuttoncporg on Twitter.Michael Tutton, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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first_imgCara McKenna APTN National NewsThe leadership of two northern B.C. First Nations are enacting their own laws to protect their territories in a move that could have a far-reaching impacts on Indigenous rights and resource development across Canada. Chiefs and councillors from the Nadleh Whut’en and Stellat’en First Nations proclaimed the province’s first Aboriginal water management regime in Vancouver last week. They are believed to be the first communities in B.C. to ever put their time-old tribal laws to paper.Nadleh Whut’en elected Chief Martin Louie, speaking on behalf of hereditary leaders, said the decision was triggered by the nations’ fight with Enbridge to protect its land from the company’s proposed Northern Gateway pipeline.But the legislation applies to numerous other projects including mining and the massive Site C hydroelectric dam.“If anyone wants to do business in the Nadleh Whu’ten land and territory, you’ll abide by our laws,” he said.“For the last thousand years, we haven’t changed in any way, the only change that you see today is that our laws are on paper.”The written legislation outlines the consultation, assessment and management that the leaders believe will be necessary to protect the water in salmon in their territories’ numerous freshwater lakes, rivers and streams.Both communities are already feeling the impacts left behind by big industry and their leaders say that now any future projects must follow their rules.Stellat’en Coun. Tannis Reynolds (Dzih Bhen) said her community is trying to find energy alternatives because there is already so much damage in their territory from the Endako Mine and Rio Tinto Alcan’s Kenney hydroelectric dam.“Even our tap water isn’t good, it’s contaminated with arsenic, people have skin deficiencies, they’re losing their hair,” she said.“We need clean water in our communities. It’s so important on so many levels, and we’re all hoping and praying that this will make a difference.”Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs Grand Chief Stewart Phillip said the policy is a reflection of a multitude of Supreme Court decisions for Indigenous rights that culminated with the landmark Tsilhqot’in Nation land claim victory in 2014.The high court decision to give Tsilhqot’in rights to more than 1,700 square km of land was hailed as a game-changer for bands across Canada, and the residual impacts of the case are now beginning to be seen.“The Tsilhqot’in decision was half of the story,” he said.“This is the other half of the story, where the principles of the Tsilhqot’in decision are incorporated into tribal indigenous nations standing up their own traditional laws. “The one word to describe this document is consent, and it’s going to have an enormous impact on major resource development.”last_img read more

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