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first_imgAs he was making his way home on Thursday evening, a minibus conductor was attacked and robbed by a lone gunman in the vicinity of Front Road, West Ruimveldt, Georgetown.Based on reports received, the 32-year-old bus conductor, who also is a resident of West Ruimveldt, was walking towards his home when the gunman approached him from behind and tapped him on his shoulder.As he spun around, he was confronted by a gun pointed to his face.The gunman confiscated $45,000 from the conductor before disappearing in the community.The conductor proceeded to the Police Station and reported the incident. Police ranks went to the scene as they commenced investigations, but no CCTV camera was present in the area.Investigations are nevertheless ongoing.last_img

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first_imgFacebook is no stranger to being sued, but a new lawsuit filed against the company this month might be the weirdest to date. As of February 5, Facebook is being sued by deceased Dutch programmer and apparent social web pioneer Joannes Jozef Everardus Van Der Meer, who passed away in 2004 – the year of Facebook’s founding. The late Van Der Meer’s justice will be sought by Rembrandt Social Media, the company that now owns his patents, and the law firm of Fish & Richardson.Thomas Edison’s Legal Team v. FacebookThe lawsuit, filed in the state of Virginia’s federal court, alleges that Facebook infringed upon two of Van Der Meer’s patents. The first, U.S. Patent No. 6,415,316, introduced a “Method and apparatus for implementing a web page diary,” which the suit will contend was a precursor to Timeline. The second, U.S. Patent No. 6,289,362, outlined a “System and method for generating, transferring and using an annotated universal address,” and has the Like button in its sights. The patents were filed in 1998 and issued to Van Der Meer in 2002 and 2001, respectively. So both pre-date the 2004 launch of Facebook. Social bookmarking company Add This is also being sued for violation of the second patent.While it’s hard to imagine that such a strange case will have much ground to stand on, Fish & Richardson has deep roots in intellectual property, counting Alexander Graham Bell, Thomas Edison and the Wright Brothers among its early clients. Facebook’s legal team hasn’t been around since 1878, but isn’t exactly new to this sort of thing. (And hey, it’s hiring – this might be a long one, after all.) Patent-holder Rembrandt claims that the patents “represent an important foundation of social media as we know it” and is seeking royalties on this so-called foundational knowledge until 2021.Um, Surfbook?According to Ars Technica, it gets even weirder. Around the time he filed the patents, Van Der Meer also owned www.surfbook.com, though what he intended to do with the domain is a mystery. According to a Whois search, surfbook.com is now owned by brand protection group MarkMonitor. The IP claim on “web page diaries” would seem to have some big implications for pretty much the whole internet. Besides, some of us were already avidly documenting what we had for lunch on sites like Open Diary and LiveJournal in the internet dark age of 1999, back when Timeline was only a twinkle in Zuckerberg’s eye. Image of Mark Zuckerberg by Taylor Hatmaker Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… taylor hatmakercenter_img Related Posts Tags:#Facebook#lawsuits#Patents#social networks A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditlast_img read more

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first_imgA man sanitizes his hands at the entrance to the media cafeteria in Gangneung, South Korea, Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2018. South Korean authorities deployed 900 military personnel at the Pyeongchang Olympics on Tuesday after the security force was depleted by an outbreak of norovirus. (Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press via AP)PYEONGCHANG, South Korea — Signs posted around the Olympic venues urge extreme caution. Nine hundred troops stream into the area to help. Worried organizers sequester 1,200 people in their rooms.Officials are scrambling on the eve of the biggest planned event in South Korea in years — not because of anything related to North Korea and national security, but in an attempt to arrest the spread of norovirus at the Pyeongchang Games.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Local media are fretting over a “virus panic.” South Koreans, always quick to air their views online, have poured scorn on the government’s response and preparations. Are the games hygienic? What will people think about South Korea? Could this spread to the athletes?Norovirus fears may turn out to be much ado about nothing. But with a national reputation on the line, officials are scrambling to contain its spread. No one here wants these games associated more with disease than athletics in the manner that Zika, a mosquito-borne disease linked to a rare birth defect, loomed over the Rio Olympics in 2016.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutAccording to Olympics organizers, the norovirus spread began Sunday when private security workers staying in the Jinbu area of Pyeongchang started complaining of headaches, stomach pain and diarrhea.About 1,200 people were kept in their rooms during tests for the contagious virus. Local and national health officials say they have investigated 1,023 people. Games organizers said Wednesday that 32 workers are being treated for norovirus and are in quarantine, including three foreigners. The liberal Hankyoreh newspaper published an interview with an anonymous civil security staff member who said that the tap water at the facility that accommodated the security workers “smelled fishy, or like something was decaying.” The staff member was also quoted as saying that officials were remiss after workers began showing symptoms.The conservative JoongAng Ilbo newspaper, meanwhile, said in an editorial that the norovirus outbreak raises worries about hygiene at the Olympics, and whether the illness might reach the athletes because some of the security workers showing symptoms had reportedly worked at the athletes’ villages.“As the virus panic spreads fast, some of the infected people turned out to have handled security at the Olympic village,” the editorial said, “which rings alarms over the management of hygiene conditions during the games.” Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH MOST READ Read Next LATEST STORIES John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding AFP official booed out of forum NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH Harden surpasses 15,000 points as Rockets trip Nets 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises View comments Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games PLAY LIST 00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Because the sick workers handled security, 900 military personnel have been brought in to work at 20 venues until the sick and sequestered can return to work. Officials are conducting an epidemiological survey to track the disease’s spread. A preliminary five-day survey of water for cooking and drinking has come up negative for norovirus. Health officials say they are also inspecting restaurants and all food facilities linked to the Olympics.Notices have been posted around the Olympics urging regular, 30-second hand-washing sessions and the thorough boiling of water and washing of fruits and vegetables, among other precautions.The virus spread appears to feed a lingering South Korean sense of worry that the games will be filled with glitches and mistakes. The lodgings and transportations will be shoddy; the food will be poor, the service spotty; the weather will be too cold and the venues inadequately heated. Instead of putting on the best games possible, there will be too much focus by the liberal national government on efforts to engage rival North Korea and cater to their visiting athletes and cheering squads.Despite the official response, South Koreans have criticized the allegedly poor preparations at the Olympics, and what they believe was a slow reaction to initial reports of the virus.Local media have reported that the first symptoms began on Jan. 31 — not Sunday, as organizers say — long before officials launched a fact-finding investigation. There have also been reports of bad hygiene at the accommodations and complaints about meals and lodgings.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

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