Tag: Denny

16 April 2010United Nations officials have called on Member States and private donors to support a trust fund to pay for a permanent memorial at United Nations Headquarters in New York to the victims of slavery and the transatlantic slave trade. Kiyo Akasaka, Under-Secretary-General for Communication and Public Information, and Amir Dossal, Executive Director of the UN Office for Partnerships (UNOP), made the appeal yesterday while receiving a donation of $250,000 from India, which is currently the largest single contributor to the fund.In 2007 the General Assembly commemorated the bicentenary of the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade by designating 25 March as an annual day of remembrance and endorsing the idea of constructing a permanent memorial at UN Headquarters “in acknowledgment of the tragedy and consideration of its legacy.”The trust fund was launched in May last year to pay for the memorial construction and India’s donation means that about $700,000 has been raised so far – less than a quarter of the $4.5 million that is estimated to be needed if the memorial is to be erected by 2012.Ambassador Raymond Wolfe of Jamaica is heading efforts to erect the memorial, while a committee of interested States is also participating in the trust fund.At a ceremony yesterday to mark the Indian donation, which was handed over by Ambassador H. S. Puri, Mr. Akasaka stressed that the memorial should serve as a living reminder to the international community of the need to maintain momentum in combating the legacy of slavery, including pernicious contemporary forms of the practice. read more

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OTTAWA — The Supreme Court of Canada says internet service providers can recover some of the costs of helping movie companies and other copyright holders find illegal downloaders.In a decision today, the high court sides with Rogers Communications in ruling that the companies pursuing copyright violators should reimburse service providers a reasonable amount for the effort of looking up subscribers suspected of breaking the law.The decision could end up saving Rogers and other internet providers many thousands of dollars, but the Supreme Court says the appropriate fees should be decided at a future Federal Court hearing.The case began when movie production firm Voltage Pictures asked Rogers for information about an alleged violator under provisions of the Copyright Act.Rogers retrieved the information but agreed to disclose it only upon payment of a fee — $100 per hour of work plus HST.Voltage Pictures hopes to eventually obtain the information of tens of thousands of suspected copyright infringers, and it argued the federal legislative regime precluded Rogers from charging a fee. read more

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