Tag: Lona

first_imgPaul Pogba must learn to deal with being blamed for Manchester United’s shortcomings but can emerge from a tough start to his second spell at Old Trafford, according to Park Ji-Sung.The World Cup winner returned to the club for £89 million ($113m) in the summer of 2016 from Juventus, but has yet to begin to repay that fee.Pogba’s relationship with Jose Mourinho has been the central narrative of his second coming prior to the Portuguese coach’s sacking earlier this month. Editors’ Picks ‘There is no creativity’ – Can Solskjaer get Man Utd scoring freely again? ‘Everyone legged it on to the pitch!’ – How Foden went from Man City superfan to future superstar Emery out of jail – for now – as brilliant Pepe papers over Arsenal’s cracks What is Manchester United’s ownership situation and how would Kevin Glazer’s sale of shares affect the club? On-the-field, Pogba’s form has wavered significantly and Park – a winner of 13 major honours during his spell at United – says he must deal with his displays being heavily scrutinised.”It’s inevitable, he is a star player in the team who gets enormous interest from people,” he told Goal.”It’s obvious that the blame will be on him if the team is not doing well.”But on the other hand, he will be the one praised when the team is doing well.”He has to overcome the situation. He’s a positive player, so I think he wouldn’t really mind. I’m sure he can get over it.”The final three years of Park’s time at United overlapped with the end of Pogba’s first spell at the club, which ended when he moved to Juve in 2012.And the ex-South Korea international admits that even at a tender age and while learning his trade in the academy, his talent was known to even the senior members of the club.Park added: “He wasn’t a first-team player. He was an academy player sometimes called up in training and matches.”He was physically and technically excellent, and a lot of people talked about him. He was famous even when he was an academy player.”There was no doubt he would become a first-team player one day. It was just a matter of how big a player he would become.” Check out Goal’s Premier League 2019-20 fantasy football podcast for game tips, debate and rivalries.last_img read more

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MONTREAL — Growth in the number of passengers Air Canada carries could prompt it to order more narrow-body aircraft from Boeing and Bombardier, the airline said.The country’s largest carrier has placed firm orders for 61 Boeing 737 Max and 45 Bombardier C Series jets, but the number of aircraft was based on its requirements in 2013.Air Canada also has options and rights to purchase 48 more Boeing planes and an additional 30 CS300 aircraft to give it more flexibility to meet increased demand.“So obviously there is some pretty great opportunities there to expand that and exercise more, but obviously it won’t affect 2018 in any fashion,” CEO Calin Rovinescu said Wednesday as the airline posted record quarterly revenue and profits.The first two Boeing 737 Max planes will arrive this year and 16 more by next June. The remaining aircraft are scheduled to be delivered through 2021.Delivery of the first C Series jets are slated to be added for late 2019, through 2022.The comments came as Air Canada (TSX:AC) reported a third-quarter profit of $1.79 billion or $6.44 per diluted share, boosted by a one-time $793-million tax recovery. That compared with a profit of $768 million or $2.74 per diluted share in the same quarter last year.On an adjusted basis, Air Canada earned $950 million or $3.43 per diluted share in the quarter, up from $821 million or $2.93 per diluted share in the third quarter of 2016.Meanwhile, revenue in the quarter ended Sept. 30 totalled $4.88 billion, up from $4.45 billion on a large growth in business cabin revenues and the carrying of a record 14 million passengers.Passenger traffic was up 8.8 per cent compared with the same quarter last year, while passenger revenue per available seat mile increased 0.4 per cent.Rovinescu said that expressions of interest from bank and non-bank financial institutions wanting to become a credit card partner for its new loyalty program will be submitted by year-end with a request for proposals coming in early 2018.“There has been a tremendous amount of interest from the financial community,” he said.The airline served notice in May that it does not plan to renew its partnership with Aeroplan parent Aimia (TSX:AIM) when the current contract ends. Aeroplan used to be a division of Air Canada before it was spun off as part of its restructuring.Air Canada has invited key financial institutions to participate in bids to join the launch of the program on July 1, 2020.Rovinescu added that Air Canada has also been approached by several technology companies interested in a separate request for proposal, or RFP, that will also be issued early next year. read more

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“While the recent focus has rightly been on refugees entering Europe, there are 4 million refugees – 2 million of them children – who are holed up in Jordan, Turkey and Lebanon, many living on the streets in a crisis which is now of biblical proportions,” Gordon Brown told reporters at UN Headquarters via telephone.The former British Prime Minister drew attention to the fact that “traditionally education has fallen through the net because humanitarian aid goes to food and shelter, and development aid does not plan for emergencies.”But given the “severity” of the crisis and “urgency” to act to address the problem, Mr. Brown appealed for a swift response to a $250 million proposal that would get 1 million Syrian refugee children in school in 21 days in Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey using a “double shift system.”He explained that under the proposed plan in Lebanon, for example, the local children would go to the school in the morning and the same classrooms would be used for Syrian children to get an education in the afternoon.At a cost of $10 a week, he said, the children can get an education that would help prepare them for the future and give them hope under this “practical, operable and deliverable plan.”And in a separate warning about the Syrian child refugee crisis, the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) said the conflict in Syria has left some 16 million people – almost half of them children – in need of life-saving assistance and protection, including basic health care, safe water and sanitation and education. “The refugee and migrant crisis in Europe will only worsen if greater efforts are not made to end the protracted conflict in Syria and address the humanitarian needs of the millions affected by the violence,” UNICEF said.UNICEF reported that some 2 million children are now out of school inside Syria, while up to 5 million people living in cities and communities across the country have suffered the consequences of long and sometimes deliberate interruptions to their water supplies in recent months.Despite the enormous challenges facing those affected by the conflict, funding for humanitarian assistance is not keeping pace with needs – UNICEF’s appeal for 2015 for programmes in Syria and surrounding countries, totalling $903 million, is less than half funded. read more

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