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first_imgREAD: Sonoma Paint Scheme Preview READ: Power Rankings Week 15 READ: Pre-Sonoma Driver Reports “Jim (France), you will be the leader for our future in America, and you’ll be our standard-bearer this year.”— Don Panoz, founder of American Le Mans Series presented by Tequila Patron GRAND-AM Road Racing founder recalls prior visits and road-racing mergercenter_img The moment evoked thoughts and emotions that led him to three places — past, present and future.“Being here today, it reminds me of coming here in 1962 with my father, Bill France Sr. and NASCAR driver Fireball Roberts, who raced a Ferrari here,” France said. “And it reminds me of 1976 when my brother Bill France Jr. waved the starting flag in the year we had two NASCAR stock cars in Le Mans.“Regarding the present, it’s just wonderful to be here, but this is about a whole lot more than me. And finally, regarding the future, being here is an example of America’s strong relationship with the ACO, which will be so important to the new United SportsCar Racing (USCR) series that debuts next year.”The flag presentation was the focal point of a press conference at the 24 Hours of Le Mans museum. Pierre Fillon, president of the Automobile Club de l’Ouest (ACO) which stages the event, began the presentation, saying “the competition will be unleashed on Saturday by Jim France,” adding that France’s appearance continues “a long and fruitful association between Le Mans and the United States.”The presentation itself was handled by Don Panoz, founder of the American Le Mans Series (ALMS) presented by Tequila Patrón. Starting next year when the merger of the ALMS and GRAND-AM is complete, the pair will lead the board of directors guiding the new series. France will serve as chairman, Panoz as vice chairman.“Jim, you will be the leader for our future in America,” Panoz said.“And you’ll be our standard-bearer this year.”READ MORE: LE MANS, FRANCE (June 20, 2013) – GRAND-AM Road Racing founder Jim France was formally presented Thursday with the French flag he’ll use to start the 90th anniversary running of the 24 Hours of Le Mans. READ: Mobil 1 Tech: Car seat safetylast_img read more

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first_imgThe early 1960s were a strange time. With Rock n’ Roll taking the Blues and R&B into new stratospheres, it took a few years for the burgeoning genre to comfortably adapt into pop culture. No one knew how to market the music, and brands certainly didn’t know how to incorporate the new genre into their marketing strategies. All of this brings us to 1963 (or 1964), when The Rolling Stones were tapped to write a jingle for Kellogg’s Rice Krispies cereal. Thanks to footage unearthed by The Daily Mail, we can see this commercial now in all of it’s awkward glory.Original band member Brian Jones apparently wrote the jingle, with Mick Jagger including the brand’s familiar “Snap, Crackle, Pop” motto into the jingle, while also singing that the cereal is “for you and you and you” in a way that only Mick Jagger could deliver. We’re not sure if this commercial actually sold any boxes of Rice Krispies, but we’d like to think that the cereal owes everything to the Rolling Stones!See the commercial for yourself!last_img read more

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first_imgJames R. Houghton, the longest-serving member of the Harvard Corporation and chair of the University’s 2006-07 presidential search, today announced his plans to step down at the end of the 2009-10 academic year, after 15 years on the Corporation.Houghton confirmed his plans to his Corporation colleagues at their meeting on Monday, December 7, and said he wished to announce his intentions before year end so a search can begin promptly in the new year.“It’s been a true honor to have been able to serve Harvard over the years,” said Houghton, chairman emeritus of Corning Incorporated.  “I believe that today, under the leadership of our distinguished president and with support from our other constituencies, the future of our ‘fair Harvard’ is bright indeed.  I’ve been around Harvard for more than 50 years, through challenge and change, and the wealth of talent in our community never ceases to amaze me.  I have every confidence that Harvard will continue to demonstrate the unique capacity of great universities to educate students and generate new ideas in ways that change the world.”“Jamie Houghton has served Harvard with extraordinary devotion and a profound concern for the well-being of the University and its people,” said President Drew Faust.  “He has seen Harvard through times of change with a steady hand and a constant commitment to the best interests of the University — above all, the quality of our students’ educational experience and the capacity of our faculty to shape the course of knowledge.  Throughout his tenure on the Corporation, he has dedicated his time and care to helping knit the parts of Harvard more closely together and to helping realize the promise of collaborative ventures from the sciences to the arts and across the professions.  I’m one of many people at Harvard who have benefited from his thoughtful counsel and common sense, and who have come to value his friendship and generosity of spirit.  We owe him our deep gratitude for his years of selfless service to Harvard, and for what I’m sure will be continuing active engagement in the life of the University.”A 1958 graduate of Harvard College and 1962 graduate of Harvard Business School, Houghton joined the Harvard Corporation in 1995 and became its senior fellow in 2002.  He is the past chair of the University’s joint committee on inspection, and serves on the Corporation’s committee on shareholder responsibility, as well as the joint committee on appointments and the committee on University resources.Houghton has devoted his professional career to Corning Incorporated, one of the world’s leading makers of specialty glass and ceramics.  He started at Corning in 1962, after graduating from business school.  He rose to become the company’s chairman of the board and chief executive officer from 1983 to 1996 and later served again as both chairman (2002-08) and CEO (2002-05).Houghton served on the boards of directors of several companies and remains chairman of the board of trustees of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.  He is also a longtime trustee of both the Pierpont Morgan Library and the Corning Museum of Glass.  He is past chairman of the Business Council of New York State and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the Trilateral Commission.A search to identify a new member of the Corporation will begin soon.  Under the University’s charter, a new member  is elected by the President and Fellows, with the counsel and consent of the Board of Overseers.  The search will be conducted by a joint committee of the governing boards.  Robert D. Reischauer, who joined the Corporation in 2002 and served as a member of the Board of Overseers for the six preceding years, will succeed Houghton as senior fellow.Confidential letters of nomination or advice may be directed to the Corporation Search Committee, Harvard University, Loeb House, 17 Quincy St., Cambridge, MA 02138, or to [email protected]last_img read more

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first_imgIt’s only 175 square feet, but it’s cozy, clean and makes all the difference in the world to a young farmer who is learning to work the land.It’s a tiny house built by students taking a University of Georgia sustainable building course and donated to a Georgia farmer as part of Georgia Organics’ organizational push for farmer prosperity.Farmer Terri Jagger Blincoe, of Ladybug Farms in Clayton, Georgia, received the keys to the tiny house in a ceremony Saturday, Feb. 18, at Georgia Organics’ 20th annual conference in Atlanta. The house will be delivered to the farm during UGA’s spring break, the first week of March.This is the second tiny house that UGA students have donated to a Georgia farmer through Georgia Organics. “Green Building and the Tiny House Movement,” a course offered jointly through the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) and the College of Family and Consumer Sciences (FACS), launched in fall 2015.During the class, which is co-taught by FACS Assistant Professor Kim Skobba, of the housing management and policy department, and CAES Associate Professor David Berle, of the horticulture department, students learn about land planning and building code issues facing American cities. They also design and build a tiny house. Georgia Organics helps to fund the construction, then selects a farmer to receive the house, a farmer who pledges to use the house to help train a younger farmer.“This project would not happen without UGA and their sustainable building class, who designed and built the tiny house,” said Alice Rolls, executive director of Georgia Organics. “We give a valuable asset to a farmer, but it’s also an amazing educational opportunity for students to learn sustainable design.”A Georgia Organics selection committee received several applications from farmers interested in receiving the tiny house. The farmers wrote essays explaining how they would use the house if they were to win.Blincoe stood out because she was an established farmer with a history of hosting younger, apprentice farmers, Berle said.Ladybug Farms distributes produce to restaurants around metro Atlanta and through a community-supported agriculture program in Atlanta’s Cabbagetown neighborhood. The farm is also active in the Northeast Georgia Farm to School program and serves as an apprenticeship site for UGA’s Journeyman Farmer Certificate Program.“They have a unique outreach model that fits well with our purposes and with those of Georgia Organics,” Berle said.Tiny houses enable young people to learn how to farm from older farmers or even to start farming because they solve a critical problem — the lack of on-farm housing, Berle said.“There’s a need on many farms for housing, especially for young farmers, for interns, for apprentices,” Berle said. “There are a lot of people who are willing to share their knowledge, but (there is) not always a place for apprentices to live. And in many cases, there are farms that people would let a young farmer use, but the owners are still living in the farmhouse. Building a tiny house fills that need.”For more information about the sustainable building class’s latest project — a trailer-based catering kitchen and accessible bathroom for use at UGArden — visit tinydawghouse.com. This latest project is being built with lumber cut on-site from storm-damaged trees.last_img read more

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first_imgWeek Ending May 2, 2009. There were 1,104 new regular benefit claims for Unemployment Insurance last week, a decrease of 397 from the week before. Altogether 18,005 new and continuing claims were filed, 425 less than a week ago and 8,237 more than a year earlier. The Department also processed 2,265 First Tier claims for benefits under Emergency Unemployment Compensation, 2008 (EUC08), 143 more than a week ago. In addition, there were 1,342 Second Tier claims for benefits processed under the EUC08 program which is an increase of 43 from the week before. The Unemployment Weekly Report can be found at: http://www.vtlmi.info/(link is external). Previously released Unemployment Weekly Reports and other UI reports can be found at:  http://www.vtlmi.info/lmipub.htm#uc(link is external)last_img

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first_imgBefore you sign an expensive contract with an SEO firm, consider doing a little SEO DIY. There are several things you can do right now to optimize your site for search and boost your rankings. Put your company credit card away and try these tips first.DIY SEO #1: Rewrite Your Page ContentTo improve the quality of search results for users, Google changed it’s algorithms (the proprietary formulas that rank websites in a search) to reward sites that feature clear, informative content. The idea is simple — if you provide useful, informative content on your site, Google is more likely to display your website to a person performing a Google search.Voila, better rankings!Action Item: Review your site page-by-page. Edit page text to trim fluff and rewrite content to include only what’s relevant and beneficial for the user to know. Steer clear of using industry terms that are confusing to the layman.DIY SEO #2: Update Your Content OftenThe more you add fresh content to your website, the more frequently you’ll be indexed by search engines. If your content is useful and engaging, that frequency could result in a rankings bump.Action Item: Add new pages, update existing pages, keep homepage content fresh.DIY SEO #3: Scrub Your Site of Old SEO Tricks“Keyword stuffing” is an old school SEO tactic that involves cramming numerous keywords and phrases onto every website page. Sometimes the keywords would be displayed in visible lists and sometimes they would be hidden, displayed in a font color that matched the site background. “Keyword stuffing” is highly frowned upon by search engines and will result in banning or ranking penalties.Action Item: Review your site and look for excessive keyword use. Remove it immediately and replace with quality page content.DIY SEO #4: Use Keywords ProperlyDon’t avoid keywords entirely — just use them naturally as part of good content. For example, if you are an organic orange farmer and you want to be found in a search for organic oranges, you definitely want to use the words “organic” and “orange” in your page content, but in an appropriate way.BAD: Our organic oranges are the most organic oranges that any organic orange farm has ever grown.GOOD: Our farm grows organic oranges, free of pesticides and non-natural fertilizers.Action Item: Check pages to ensure that keywords are not missing and are used once or twice in a natural way. If possible, try to include the word in your page title.DIY SEO #5: Optimizing Images for Faster Load SpeedGoogle and Bing both factor website load speed into their search rankings. This is how fast or slow your website loads in a web browser. Large images are a common culprit for dragging down load speed. Big, beautiful images make a website look great, but can slow the site down to a crawl. Fixing this issue not only improves SEO, but also allows users to navigate the site more quickly.Action Item: Swap out images with large file sizes with smaller file, “optimized” images.DIY SEO #6: Find and Fix Broken LinksBroken links stop search engine spiders in their tracks. Too many broken links can indicate that a site is old and neglected.Action Item: Fix or remove broken links on all of your site pages.DIY SEO #7: Header TagsIf your website was built in a content management system, you likely have the ability to apply header tags to your page content. For example, you may use “Heading 1” for your page title and “Heading 2” for a sub-title. These tags indicate an order of hierarchy or importance to search engines.Action Item: If you have not applied Header Tags to text on any of your content pages, do so now. If appropriate, include relevant keywords in your headers. Update your Title Tags too, if your CMS allows.Need a Little More Guidance? Enlist the help of a knowledgeable web developer for just a few hours and they’ll make back-end updates that you can’t, at a fraction of the cost of SEO firms.For developer assistance, contact Loudthought at 214.827.2600 or via email at [email protected] 42SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Jeff Kjoller Jeff has extensive experience in branding, art direction and graphic design, having served employers and clients in a creative capacity for more than twenty-five years. After graduating from the University … Web: www.loudthought.biz Detailslast_img read more

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first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr You might want to re-evaluate. According to one of the world’s foremost experts on customer experience, it might not be what you think it is.  Luckily, we’ve got that very expert on this week’s episode of Banking of Experience to help you gauge where your organization truly stands.Jeannie Walters is the founder and CEO of Experience Investigators by 360Connext, a Forbes Coaches Council Member, a LinkedIn Learning and Lynda.com instructor and last, but certainly not least, a TEDx speaker. And she joins CRMNEXT’s Marla Fields this week to impart some of her wisdom gleaned from over two decades as a customer experience consultant.So, what can you expect to hear from our master of CX? What led her to want to improve CX at organizations all over the globe. For Jeannie, it it’s all about “advocating for customers.” continue reading »last_img read more

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first_img78 Primrose St, Belgian Gardens.THIS four-bedroom Belgian Gardens home has all the charm and character expected from a house that is nearly 100 years old – but walk inside and you’ll find no shortage of modern amenities.Unlike a traditional Queenslander which can often be cramped inside, 78 Primrose St offers open plan living with a spacious kitchen that opens out to a paved outdoor living area complete with a swimming pool and wood-fired pizza oven. 78 Primrose St, Belgian Gardens.Mr Short said the home was actually mining cottages that were transported from Paluma and joined to make one house. The home is also fitted with a 5kW solar system while it is set on the crest of an elevated ridge line providing cool breezes and plenty of natural light.The streamlined kitchen has stone composite tops with stainless steel appliances while the dining room is big enough to comfortably fit a 12-seat table.The home is set on a, 1012sq m allotment with a big grassed yard, double car accommodation and adjoining storeroom. It’s superbly located within walking distance to Soroptomist Park and in the catchment area for Belgian Gardens State School. 78 Primrose St, Belgian Gardens.Selling agents Tracey Stack and Emma Nancarrow from Smith & Elliott said the house would make a great family home.“It’s really a Queenslander with a modern twist,” they said.“It’s a real character house but it is very functional and with the floor plan you have a really big open living area and kitchen.“One of the things that is really great about this house is you can stand in the kitchen and cook and see the kids swimming in the pool or you can look the other way and see them playing in the yard.” 78 Primrose St, Belgian Gardens.More from news01:21Buyer demand explodes in Townsville’s 2019 flood-affected suburbs12 Sep 202001:21‘Giant surge’ in new home sales lifts Townsville property market10 Sep 2020Mr Short said he would love for another family who will make their own happy memories to buy the home.“Now that we have done the renovations we’re really happy with the new amenities,” he said.“We had lived in it for 10 years when we did the renovations so we knew exactly what we wanted to do.“I think there is something special about this house because I know there is a lot of Queenslanders but they can be small and pokey but because this is a big Queenslander, it’s all on one level and we have modernised it, it’s a bit different to everything else out there.” 78 Primrose St, Belgian Gardens.The home was refurbished and expertly redesigned three years ago to deliver the perfect combination of old world charm and modern living.It’s hit the market for $799,000 and is in the tightly held suburb of Belgian Gardens in easy walking distance to the beach.John Short has lived in the home with his wife and three daughters for the past 14 years and says it holds many happy memories.He is saying goodbye to the home his daughters grew up in and upgrading to take advantage of Townsville’s affordable property market.last_img read more

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first_imgAssets under management in French PERCO workplace retirement savings plans rose 11% since last year to reach nearly €17bn, according to figures from AFG, the French asset management association. Around 2.7m employees had already made contributions to a PERCO as at the end of June, also representing 11% year-on-year growth.Over six months, gross payments into PERCOs amounted to €1.6bn, up 7% compared with the first half of 2017. Withdrawals amounted to €500m, leaving net inflows of €1.1bn, up 10%.The number of employers offering a PERCO stood at 244,000 following 6% year-on-year growth, according to AFG, with 14,000 companies creating PERCOs in the six-month period. The association also noted that more than half of companies had transformed their PERCOs into PERCO Plus plans, which offer a lower charge on employer contributions due to the incorporation of an SME financing fund. These have to be at least 7% invested in small or medium-sized companies.PERCO Plus funds passed €1bn in assets on the back of 37% year-on-year growth, according to the AFG.Considerable room for growth remained, it added, as only 25% of employees with a PERCO had access to an SME fund.A third of the nearly €17bn assets in PERCOs, belonging to 41% of members, were managed according to the default lifecycle approach, AFG noted.The average amount held in the plans by savers was stable at €6,120.Thumbs-up for ‘proper’ pension savings reformMeanwhile, AFG said pension saving in France should get a boost from the government’s “PACTE” law.One of the main objectives of the law is to harmonise France’s existing retirement savings products, of which there are four, by bringing them under a new wrapper, the Plan d’Epargne Retraite, with some new rules to make pension saving more attractive.The PACTE law heralded a “proper” pension saving reform, according to AFG.Highlighting various provisions in the draft law – tax-deductible voluntary payments, freedom of choice at retirement, access to savings for buying a principal residence, and easier transfers – the association said these would be “strong incentives for savers to further prepare their retirement saving”.The draft PACTE law was recently adopted by the Assemblée Nationale and is due to be voted on in its final form next year. The government wants to see pension saving assets grow from around €220bn currently to €300bn by 2022.last_img read more

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